Advertising
Advertising

Facebook Dislike Button Soon To Come

Facebook Dislike Button Soon To Come

If you’ve been irritated, or even annoyed, about the unavailability of a Facebook Dislike button for some time, the wait is finally over. The company’s co-co-founder Mark Zuckerberg confirmed the eventual arrival of this feature during a question-and-answer session in September 2015. Since the introduction of the Like button, back in 2009, it’s not only become a way of communicating, but certainly a way to measure engagement.

It’s going to be tricky to see how the social network will design and roll out the so-called Dislike button. The Like button was a runaway success — on a daily average, it generates over 50 million Likes. In addition, one in every five websites uses Facebook’s feature, and thousands of marketers and advertisers utilize this to measure audience metrics. Here’s some more info about it.

Advertising

behind-the-facebook-like-button_51198f4b43e2f_w1500

    How Will Facebook develop the Dislike Button?

    As of now, there is no definitive date as to when this new Facebook button goes live. With that being said, Zuckerberg did hint to some degree how it would function. He asserted that the purpose of the button is not to turn the Facebook platform into a forum where people vote up or down people’s posts. In other words, Facebook is going to come up with a way that can effectively express empathy without jeopardizing the user experience and avoid an uproar.

    Advertising

    With 280 million friend requests sent daily on the social channel, over four billion videos watched, 350 million photos uploaded daily along with 150 billion “moments,” changes once again will come. This also means that for the various industries (telecom, retail, business, finance, etc.) who have an e-commerce website, a plugin, or an application program interface (API), or just any other integration into Facebook, they will have to update and make a handful of tweaks once the button is released.

    Pros and Cons of the Dislike Button

    The availability of a button that offers sympathy or a dislike for a certain post is not unprecedented. Other existing social networks, like YouTube and Reddit, still have the traditional buttons to comment, share, and like or dislike a post. It is a bold move that shows Facebook’s interest in retaining their user base and competing with Google’s video streaming service.

    Advertising

    Since the news was made, there have been scam posts on news feeds claiming to have gotten an early and all-exclusive installation of the Dislike button. Word to the wise: do not follow or open these posts. The claims are bogus and lead to intrusive surveys looking to get sensitive information, according to Hackread.com reports. When an official announcement is made, plenty of websites, experts, and news agencies will alert users on how to go about getting the button, so do not fall for a classic trap.

    The implementation of this feature with Facebook will further make interactions more meaningful and bring greater connectivity between users. What may be a hurdle for a large majority of the community is that they will have to, yet again, update current settings to facilitate this brand new incorporation onto an extensive existing list of plugins for Facebook.

    Advertising

    The Takeaways

    Since the initial public offering, Facebook has become a profitable company and shaped up to be a clear front-runner in the social media race. The last thing the company needs is a controversy on the day of launch or users finding something seriously dysfunctional. They have to be mindful of past mistakes with regards to privacy settings and be able to mitigate any potential bad press.

    The social giant did delay the Dislike button for some time. How this new functionality works will no doubt have to be intuitive, not to mention relevant, to Facebook users.

    Featured photo credit: Sean MacEntee via Flickr via flickr.com

    More by this author

    Anthony Carranza

    Multilingual writer and journalist covering all things technology and productivity.

    Best 5 Language Learning Apps to Easily Master a New Language How to Start an Online Business That Will Grow and Succeed 11 Google Chrome Apps and Features to Help You Get More Done with Less Effort 15 Smart Ways to Approach Interpersonal Relationships at Work By Jesse van Kalmthout via Flickr Top Fears About Giving Birth (And Why You Shouldn’t Worry Too Much)

    Trending in Communication

    1 7 Ways To Deal With Negative People 2 How to Talk to Strangers Without Feeling Awkward 3 What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships 4 How To Stop Negative Thoughts from Killing Your Confidence 5 This 4-Year Old Girl’s Explanation On the Problem with New Year’s Resolutions Is Everything You Need

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on January 18, 2019

    7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

    7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

    Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

    But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

    If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

    1. Limit the time you spend with them.

    First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

    Advertising

    In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

    Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

    2. Speak up for yourself.

    Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

    3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

    This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

    Advertising

    But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

    4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

    Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

    This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

    Why else would they be sharing this with you?

    Advertising

    5. Change the subject.

    When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

    Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

    6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

    Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

    I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

    Advertising

    You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

    Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

    7. Leave them behind.

    Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

    If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

    That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

    You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

    Read Next