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These 5 Things Happen To Your Brain And Body After A Digital Detox

These 5 Things Happen To Your Brain And Body After A Digital Detox

Are you addicted to your smartphone?

Do you compulsively check your email daily?

Do you scroll through your newsfeed every spare second you get?

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How do you think this might be impacting your stress levels? While spending extensive amounts of time online and on your phone might feel great in the short term, compulsive tech habits can fuel anxiety and stress.

Here are some of the reasons why you should seriously consider undergoing a digital detox:

1. You will be in tune with what’s around you. 

When we’re plugged into our devices, it’s easy to live everyday in a digital box and not even recognize what’s around us. I won’t go as far as saying that phones and other gadgets turn us into zombies, but we let the beauty of everyday life pass us by and we are not really present when we become overly reliant on them. We fail to take in the smells, sights, and sounds of life because we are too preoccupied with watching the next episode of a show and we just HAVE to know what Tiffany posted on Instagram this morning.

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 2 . Better Conversations.

Hashtags and viral videos are not real forms of conversation. I’m talking about sharing your perspective with someone, them giving you theirs, facilitating a deep exchange and learning through face to face interaction, These are the deep conversations that occur when we’re not so plugged in. In a world where answers and points of views are so often influenced by others, unplugging forces YOU to really think about issues and the goings-on of the world and share YOUR ideas.

3. New Mindset.

It’s amazing the changes that occur in people’s lives when they unplug for a while. You will probably find yourself getting back into some of those great things that you used to do like your gym routine. Because you’re not constantly distracted, you will be able to use this time to focus and take care of the things that need to be taken care of. You may find yourself using this offline time to refresh relationships, make career changes, and try other things that usually ranked lower on your priority list than Netflix and Instagram.

4. Memory enhancement.

How many of you know 3 phone numbers off the top of your head? Yeah… I thought so. We are so dependent on our devices to store all of our information that we don’t even realize how we’re negatively affecting our minds. I think of the good old days when I could remember everybody’s number- now that’s down to my parents’ and my sister’s. Apart from phone numbers, unplugging aids us to be a lot more present in interactions, therefore making it easier to remember even the most obscure details about people and things.This is extremely important because those, “Wow, I can’t believe you even remember that” moments are usually accompanied by laughter and stories that aid in the bonding and learning process.

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5. Happier and healthier.

We all know of that tech-driven anxiety, that fear of missing out on the latest event, conversation, product or content posting. It can lead to internet addiction (yes, it’s a thing) and unnecessary stress. When you unplug, it allows you to put things into perspective and focus on what’s important in your life. You will start to have better relationships, be healthier, and happier. There have been countless cases and studies that demonstrate nothing but positives when it comes to taking a tech break. Unplug for a while and start seeing positive changes in your life!

There’s much more than just these 5 points but these are the ones that really hit me when I took a 3 month tech hiatus. All of these things manifested themselves almost instantly and got me thinking about what’s really important. I am plugged in pretty regularly because of business reasons and also to be aware of what’s going on in our world. That’s the beauty of tech devices, they bring the world right to you. If your morning ritual involves checking all your social networks and then rechecking them two minutes after, you may be in need of a digital detox.

Unplug to recharge!

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Featured photo credit: Victor Hanacek via picjumbo.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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