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8 Reasons People Who Love Performing On Stage Are More Likely To Be Successful

8 Reasons People Who Love Performing On Stage Are More Likely To Be Successful

Performing on stage is a great way to prepare yourself for success in the working world. In this article, you will discover how the art and science of performing on stage equips you with valuable skills. Whether or not your stage career is over, rest assured that those skills will carry over to the office.

1. They Know When To Improvise

Success on the stage requires the ability to respond to unexpected developments. A musician may need to perform a solo if the star performer fails to show up. The ability to take in a situation and respond quickly is valuable. As the old saying goes, “The show must go on.” Bringing that attitude to the business world means that you will be highly adaptable and able to overcome problems. Stage performers know how to expand their job when the situation calls for it.

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2. They Know The Importance Of Deadlines

When you perform on stage as an actor, musician or someone else, you quickly learn the importance of deadlines. If someone is late to the production, the entire crew suffers and the audience will be upset. Showing up on time for each and every performance is a skill that carries over directly to the working world. In the professional world, showing up for meetings and meeting deadlines day after day are important skills.

3. They Know How To Present

On stage, you are in full view of the audience and your fellow performers. The confidence to stand in front of people and deliver value is important. Once you build up your foundation of confidence, you can work to develop the other habits of highly effective communicators. Remember – as a performer, you know that presentation and communication is about THE AUDIENCE, not you!

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4. They Make The Most Of What They Have

As a performer, you sometimes have to make do with limited support and equipment. For example, you may have lost your favorite instrument at home when you go on the road for a performance. A committed performer finds an alternative solution so that they can deliver a great performance. In the corporate world, this same attitude is highly valuable. You may not receive all the training and the latest technology at your office. Nevertheless, successful people find a way to achieve results.

5. They Know How To Wear Multiple Hats

Delivering a successful stage performance requires contributions from many different people. While you may specialize as an actor, you understand that the show may ask you to make different contributions from time to time. You may have to make emergency costume repairs, go shopping for supplies at the last minute or help with stage management. The ability to be flexible and take on multiple responsibilities makes a big difference. Successful people rarely say “that’s not in my job description.”

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6. They Know How To Work Long Hours To Achieve A Goal

As you work on a show, long hours are often needed. In fact, you may be working almost around the clock as opening night approaches. The mindset to keep working in order to reach a result is valuable when you perform. It also makes a major difference in the professional world. You may be working to land a sale or ship a new product. The ability to put in long hours to achieve a goal is a vital success trait.

7. They Know How To Celebrate A Success (Cast Parties!)

Many actors and performers throw a party when they successfully complete opening night. It’s a long tradition in the performing world. Organizing a party where you recognize others is an important skill. Recognizing others and being grateful for their contributions are important to professional success according to the Harvard Business Review.

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8. They Know How To Read Other People

As a performer, you are part of a team that creates a show. This principle holds true even if you are a solo performer – you have to observe and notice how the audience reacts. Truly outstanding performers observe others and the audience and adjust as they perform. These observation skills make a difference outside the performing world. With keen observation, you can pick and choose when to raise questions, when to ask for the sale and when to offer help.

Featured photo credit: Piano/Unsplash via pixabay.com

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Bruce Harpham

Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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