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6 Useful Online Tutoring Sites to Boost Your Learning

6 Useful Online Tutoring Sites to Boost Your Learning

Today, you can learn practically anything online — from mathematics, coding, speaking new languages, and almost anything else you can think of.

Dozens of online tutoring sites have educated millions of students around the world for a fraction of the cost of college courses. The key to maximizing this accessibility of information is not just choosing which topic you want to learn about, but which online tutoring sites provide the best learning experience.

We’ve narrowed down the sites to the best of the best, each with a different focus and value proposition (such as focus on age, language, higher education, etc.).

Here are six of the best and most useful online tutoring sites to boost your learning and take your knowledge to the next level.

1. Chegg Tutors

Focus: Basic Classroom Topics

What was formerly known as InstaEDU is now Chegg Tutors. Chegg offers a variety of lessons from coding, mathematics, languages, and more from a variety of online tutors. You can receive your lessons via Desktop or through their iPhone app.

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Chegg is recommended for parents and their middle or high school children who are looking for extra help with homework and upcoming exams.

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    Chegg’s rates start as low as 40 cents per minute, which is very affordable. Chegg also provides highly advanced learning technology, as you’re able to learn through chat, video, and even write on a shared whiteboard with your teacher.

    2. WizIQ

    Focus: Basic Classroom Topics & Exam Prep

    WizIQ is recognized as a top leader in online education. The company provides everything from exam prep to programming through pre-recorded lessons. Or students can book a one-on-one lesson with one of their 200,000 private teachers. WizIQ has powerful technology allowing you to experience a private virtual classrom with up to 6 people in high quality video.

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      I’ve enjoyed the free live classes that instructors put on, and the quality of video technology is first rate. I recommend WizIQ for the age group that is interested in university or higher education.

      3. Kaplan Kids

      Focus: Reading, Writing, and Mathematics

      Kaplan Kids is perfect for elmentary and middle school students who want to improve their reading, writing, and mathematics skills.
      Students are able to earn points and win prizes as they learn. It’s a fun and rewarding way for children to stay motivated and engaged while learning.

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        However, I wouldn’t recommend Kaplan for anyone 18 and up, as the topics are geared towards children and young teenagers.

        4. Sophia

        Focus: College Courses

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        Sophia is targeted at middle and high school students looking to enter college. Students have the potential to receivecollege credits for online courses at a fraction of the cost of taking a course at an actual university. At the moment, the website is only partnered with a small number of US colleges, so chances are that you will not be eligible to receive credits from Sophia classes just yet. However, you can choose from one of their 32,000 tutorials and over 6,000 different tutors to teach you nearly every subject you can think of.

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          Sophia also has a good amount of free resources that you can access if you’re looking to try it out.

          5. Rype

          Focus: Personal Language Learning

          Rype is a new brand on a mission to disrupt the old-fashioned language learning industry by introducing personalized language coaching. They provide customized language learning packages, depending on your needs, including: The Starter Package (for beginners with zero knowledge), The Traveller Package (for travelers to learn conversation skills), and Rype Club (targeted for busy individuals and those looking to maintain their skills).

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            Why Rype

              At the moment, Rype only provides Spanish lessons, but other languages are coming soon. You can get your first session for as little as $9 and receive a 14-day free trial for Rype Club.

              6. Tutor.com

              Focus: Homework Help & Career Development

              With over a million students, Tutor.com is a great destination for students looking for help with their homework or career development advice.

              Tutor.com is larger than Sofia and Chegg, with the added advantage that no appointments are necessary, and you can access tutors 24/7 no matter where you are in the world.

              Definitely a convenient option if you’re looking to immediate help on your homework or upcoming exams.

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                Over to you

                What additional tutoring websites have you tried? Which of these tutoring sites are you thinking of trying out to boost your learning?

                We’d love to hear it in the comments below!

                More by this author

                Sean Kim

                Sean is the founder and CEO of Pulsing. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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                Last Updated on September 11, 2019

                Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

                Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

                How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

                Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

                To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

                Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

                Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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                • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
                • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
                • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
                • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

                Benefits of Using a To-Do List

                However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

                • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
                • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
                • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
                • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
                • You feel more organized.
                • It helps you with planning.

                4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

                Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

                1. Categorize

                Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

                It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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                2. Add Estimations

                You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

                Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

                Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

                3. Prioritize

                To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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                • Important and urgent
                • Not urgent but important
                • Not important but urgent
                • Not important or urgent

                You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

                Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

                4.  Review

                To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

                For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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                Bottom Line

                So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

                To your success!

                More to Help You Achieve More in Less Time

                Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

                Reference

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