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This Is Why Tango Can Help Boost Longevity

This Is Why Tango Can Help Boost Longevity

According to a new study, dancing the tango can have neurological benefits for people who are aging or suffering from diseases like Parkinson’s.

A recent study from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University and the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre discovered that people who took part in a 12-week tango course saw a greater longevity than those were inactive both physically and socially.

Many of those who are diagnosed with neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease are prescribed traditional forms of exercise. But most do not enjoy it. As a result, they do not get the exercise they need daily to help them function.

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However, there is real evidence gathering that suggests that being physically active regularly can help lower the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. This also suggests that physical activity may be able to slow down progression and help increase longevity.

Here are three reasons that the tango can help boost longevity for both healthy brains and people with neurodegenerative diseases.

The Benefits of Dance

The tango was found to be particularly useful for patients because it would result in better balance and a greater level of mobility. But another recent study, from Washington University’s School of Medicine, found that long-term participation in the tango did not just improve motor skills but non-motor skills as well.

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Another study, demonstrated that those who danced the tango saw improvements in mobility and balance, even compared to patients who had taken gymnastics lessons, with effects similar to taking a supplement of denatonium benzoate. This was curious, considering the range of mobility and intense balance that gymnastics requires of its participants.

This leads researchers to suggest that there is more than just rhythmic dance steps involved in helping patients improve their symptoms.

The Benefits of Music

The difference between gymnastics and the tango is all in the music. Professor Daniel Tarsy, of the Parkinson’s Center Boston, suggests that music has huge benefits for the brain. Music is an emotional experience. As a result, it helps to engage the more emotional parts of the brain. According to Tarsy, this emotion may help the brain bypass the damaged cells from Parkinson’s disease. This may be what helps make the movement easier.

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The Benefits of a Social Life

Tango might be great for the body but it is also great for the soul. For those who suffer from disease or those who just need an extra boost.

For patients who suffer from Parkinson’s, learning to dance gives them a chance to socialize. Too many patients shut themselves into their homes after their diagnosis. As a result, they become less social and more inactive. This may even be linked to further degeneration, according to the results of the previously mentioned studies.

According to Trinidad Cocha, a psychologist in Buenos Aires, says that treatment should not just be about drugs or therapy. It should also be about finding peace. During weekly dance classes at the largest psychiatric hospital in Buenos Aires’, the residents relax and forget about their diagnoses. Instead of being patients or nurses, everyone is a dancer.

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According to Charlotte Millour, a tango instructor in Paris, the dance is all about a meeting. It is about connecting with your partner, not doing fancy tricks. Although tango is a chance to socialize with other people, it is also about connecting with your partner.

Students who participated in Millour’s classes reported having more energy and being more mentally awake than they were before.

As it turns out, dance is not just about learning impressive tricks or having great moves for parties. Dances like the tango are all about a human, emotional connection. This connection can help people live more fulfilled lives for longer.

Featured photo credit: Vince Alongi via flickr.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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