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Book Lovers Alert: 8 Of The Most Spectacular Libraries In The World

Book Lovers Alert: 8 Of The Most Spectacular Libraries In The World

Reading is probably one of my favorite things to do, but as a graduate student I don’t have a lot of extra money for going to local bookstores and filling up a shopping cart. Because of this, I spend a lot of time at libraries– both local branches and the one at my school. And though they’re great resources for all kinds of books (and audiobooks), they’re not exactly awe-inspiring.

If you find yourself in the same boat, let’s start planning a trip to some of these amazing libraries around the world, with at least one in almost every continent.

1. National Library of China, Beijing

national-library-china
    Adam Rifkin

    This library has more than 31 million items including books, Chinese literature, and historical documents. This gorgeous library is the largest in Asia and one of the biggest libraries in the entire world. We could spend a few days exploring it and still not know everything it has to offer.

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    2. Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Connecticut

    4286475665_e5aa160764_o
      Lauren Manning

      Although this manuscript library is closed for some extensive renovations right now, we can visit it after it reopens in September 2016 to find out what they’ve changed and improved. Its marble exterior protects the valuable materials from direct sunlight while the glass enclosure that holds the books provides climate control to protect them from visitors.

      3. Stuttgart City Library, Germany

      germany
        Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart

        Europe’s addition to our list is a huge nine-story library. The first four floors are your standard building shape, but the upper five floors form a pyramid with a glass ceiling. The inside is just as beautifully designed and is ready for us to visit- and those little blue couches look like the perfect place to relax with a good book.

        4. Rand Club Reading Room, Johannesburg

        south-africa
          Andrew Moore

          Although this particular library is members only, it has more than 10,000 books, magazines, newspapers, and “irreplaceable treasures.” Maybe we can sneak in and take a look at their beautiful books. Who’s with me?

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          5. Adelaide City Library, Australia

          australia
            Jon Westra

            This library is home to some absolutely stunning architecture, in addition to all of the books. The ceiling has a glass dome in the middle of it to add some natural light and let us enjoy a little bit of nature without actually having to go outside.

            6. The Royal Portuguese Reading Room, Brazil

            brazil
              Mathieu Bertrand Struck

              This South American library was completed in 1887 and apparently holds more Portuguese works than anywhere else outside of Portugal. It’s a beautiful building with some rare works, an amazing chandelier and an iron skylight. It has a wealth of information to offer us on top of the beautiful architecture.

              7. National Art Library, London

              389048674_a17e43ba86_o
                lizsmith

                If you also love art, you can try out the National Art Library in Kensington. It has reference materials about all kinds of art, from painting, to textiles, to woodwork and sculptures. It does have books too, but some of those books are works of art themselves and aren’t kept for reading.

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                8. Trinity College, Dublin

                ireland
                  Irish Welcome Tours

                  Trinity College’s library is the largest research library in Ireland AND it’s the legal deposit library for the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. This means that it gets a copy of every book that’s published in those countries. That results in the library acquiring about 100,000 new works every year. I think that could keep us busy for a little while.

                  Although there are probably hundreds more beautiful libraries in a bunch more countries, this list will give you a good starting point to plan your trip. Once you’ve hit all of these libraries, you can definitely say that you’re a well-read person who’s been to (almost) every continent.

                  Once they build a library in Antarctica, I’ll update this list so we can make it there too.

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                  Featured photo credit: Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart via flic.kr

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                  Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                  How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                  How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                  Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                  You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                  Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                  1. Work on the small tasks.

                  When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                  Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                  2. Take a break from your work desk.

                  Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                  Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                  3. Upgrade yourself

                  Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                  The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                  4. Talk to a friend.

                  Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                  Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                  5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                  If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                  Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                  Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                  6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                  If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                  Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                  Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                  7. Read a book (or blog).

                  The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                  Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                  Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                  8. Have a quick nap.

                  If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                  9. Remember why you are doing this.

                  Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                  What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                  10. Find some competition.

                  Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                  Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                  11. Go exercise.

                  Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                  Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                  As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                  Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                  12. Take a good break.

                  Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                  Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                  Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                  Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                  More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                  Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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