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6 Ways to Make Money Online

6 Ways to Make Money Online

Let’s get one thing out of the way: Working from home or online doesn’t mean you’ll end up making millions while sitting around in your underwear and barely lifting a finger. While it definitely is possible to make a living using some of the following tactics, they each require a certain amount of effort. However, unlike your average hourly job in which you get paid the same regardless of how much (or how little) effort you put into it, the best part about working online is you’ll be rewarded based on your willingness to commit to a specific task, and are free to create your own destiny. Here are some ways you can make money online.

1. Website Testing

Sites like UserTesting give you the opportunity to review new and upcoming websites, giving the creators feedback as you explore them. It’s possible to make a pretty decent hourly rate testing and reviewing websites, as a single task usually takes less than a half hour and pays around $10 per gig. However, sites like UserTesting often have a large pool of candidates, and you’ll only be asked to review sites that fit your interests, so the workload may not be steady enough to create a consistent cashflow.

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2. Data Entry

If your keyboarding skills are up to snuff, you might want to consider signing up for websites such as VirtualBee, which connects typists with clients in need of data entry transfers. After signing up, you’ll be given an aptitude test to determine your eligibility. It’s possible to make up to $20 an hour on gigs, but, like website testing, the work is sporadic and may not be enough for a full-time income.

3. Completing Surveys

You’ve probably seen sites advertising surveys for cash, and blown them off as a pipe dream. While many of them are full of empty promises, some sites actually do follow through with their pledges. Sites like iPoll and MySurvey make it possible to earn some side cash while you relax on the couch watching TV. Some websites even offer signup bonuses that will result with quick cash just for logging in. You probably won’t make a killing completing surveys online, but it is possible.

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4. Tutoring

Regardless of whether or not you’re a certified teacher, you can find ways to make money online by tutoring high school and college students in need of test prep. TruePrep is a site dedicated to connecting tutors with high school students who need help studying for the SATs. After completing an aptitude test and going through an audition, you’ll be able to set your own hours and rate of pay. Some tutors make around $50 per Skype session.

5. Proofreading

If you love poring over newspapers, magazines, and books looking for typographical and grammatical errors, you should look into getting paid to do it. While sites like Fiverr and Elance exist to connect proofreaders with clients, you’ll often end up underselling yourself due to the sheer volume of workers advertising their skills. Take a look at Proofread Anywhere, a site offering a course not only on how to become an expert proofreader, but how to find clients that pay well and will consistently need your assistance. Caitlin Pyle, the founder of Proofread Anywhere, makes a full-time income proofreading for less than 30 hours a week.

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6. Create a personalized online store

This is perhaps the most involved entry on the list, but it also has the most potential to end up becoming a full-time gig. An entry on Bitcatcha’s blog fully details the best methods for creating an online store in which you can sell your personal crafts, creations, or services. Again, this is in no way meant to be a get rich quick scheme. However, creating a business that operates almost exclusively online is the best way to ensure your fledgling company reaches a variety of audiences across the globe.

Featured photo credit: Paying attention to detail / Nic McPhee via farm1.staticflickr.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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