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The Bruce Lee Way of Mastering A New Skill

The Bruce Lee Way of Mastering A New Skill

Focused practice is one of the best ways to learn and master a new skill. Legendary martial artist and actor Bruce Lee (1940-1973) used this approach to great effect in building his skills. Lee’s technique is all about in-depth practice. Bruce Lee put it in these terms: “I don’t fear the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks. I fear the man who practiced one kick 10,000 times.”

1. Seek Out New Environments To Grow Faster

Though he was born in the United States, Lee spent much of his early life in Hong Kong. That meant he faced a significant challenge when he decided to move back to the USA as a young man. To grow his skills, Lee enrolled at the University of Washington and worked as a waiter to pay his way through university. Lee’s decision to study drama at university gave him a strong foundation for his acting career.

Apply this skill to your career by looking for new environments where you can challenge yourself to grow. Is there a new project you can join? Is there a newly formed work committee you can join? Expand your expertise and take on new challenges.

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2. Commit To Learning A Skill like Lee

Lee’s commitment to learning martial arts is well-known. His studies began as a teenager and continued throughout his career. Before he started to innovate and create new forms, Lee focused his effort on learning the basic techniques for years.

You can apply this approach to your career in two ways:

Study and work toward a “black belt”: Keep studying and work toward advanced certifications in your field. If everyone has the entry level certification in your department, look for an advanced certification that will deepen your skills further (e.g. earn the Six Sigma Black Belt from ASQ).

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Do regular drills to keep your skills sharp: In learning martial arts, Lee performed the same moves over and over again. Look for ways to polish your performance in the same way. Can you learn how to run meetings better? Or perfect your sales presentation so that you close more sales? Practice makes perfect even in your professional career.

3. Deepen Your Understanding through Teaching

Starting in 1959, Bruce Lee started to teach martial arts to students. By teaching his techniques, he learned how to go deeper. He learned how to view his skills and techniques as a system and communicate that to others. You can share your technical knowledge with others and also pass along what you know in a variety of ways.

For example, sharing technical knowledge can lead to helping your team members. If you are a highly skilled Excel user, offer to leave a “lunch and learn” session where you demonstrate your favorite time saving approaches.

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Also, once you understand a skill consider putting the ideas into writing. For background on how to make complex skills easy to understand, I suggest taking a look at the For Dummies books. That book series does great work in making complex topics easy to manage.

4. Seek Out Clear Feedback To Improve

Bruce Lee’s commitment to improving his skills meant seeking feedback. In martial arts, feedback is instant and impossible to avoid. Bruce tries a kick or a punch and he could immediately see the results. Seconds later, he could try another kick in a slightly different way. Performing music or creating computer code also offer instant feedback on your efforts.

If you are not in a field where immediate feedback is needed, try these techniques. First, act on past feedback. At some point in the past, you have been given feedback on how to improve. You may have forgotten to put it into action. Start by putting that feedback (e.g. showing up on time at the office or taking care of household errands faster) into action. Once you do that, you will be more likely to receive more feedback.

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Second, ask clarifying questions about criticism or negative feedback. Feedback is useless if you don’t understand it at work or elsewhere. If the feedback is confusing, ask for clarification. Consider asking for a suggestion on how you can improve next time.

Featured photo credit: Bruce Lee/Guerrilla Freelancing via guerrillafreelancing.com

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Bruce Harpham

Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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