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These 5 Entrepreneurs Prove That Success Comes At Any Age

These 5 Entrepreneurs Prove That Success Comes At Any Age

We live at a time when becoming successful requires you to be young and under 30. Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong in starting out early. But success as an entrepreneur doesn’t have to imply that you are in your 20s. Actually you can become what you want to be at any age as certain examples have shown us in the past. Here are some successful entrepreneurs that became successful in their different ventures way above the age of 30, and it didn’t stop them from becoming famous and acknowledged for their innovative accomplishments.

Ray Kroc, McDonald’s

“The definition of salesmanship is the gentle art of letting the customer have it your way.”-Ray Kroc

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During his teenage years Kroc took a job as Lily-Tulip Cup Co. His stint in the company saw him emerge as the company’s top salesperson. However he went on to obtain exclusive marketing rights to a milkshake mixing machine called the Multimixer. By the time he approached the age 50 sales of the milkshake device started to drop. There was however one small restaurant that ordered eight machines. Kroc went out to discover what kind of restaurant would need to churn out 40 milk shakes at a time. This was how he stumbled on McDonald’s a restaurant owned by Dick and Mac McDonald. He bought McDonald’s at the age of 52 and turned it into the world’s biggest fast-food franchise.

Wally Blume, Denali Flavors

“The goal of our business is to fund the gospel.” – Wally Blume

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Wally Blume had spent 20 years in the diary business before he decided to venture out and start his own business in 1995, Denali Flavors. By 2009 Denali Flavors was making 80 million dollars in revenue. What is interesting to know is that Wally Blume was 57 years old when he decided to start his business and to make it a success.

Arianna Huffington, Huffington Post

“Fearlessness is not the absence of fear. It’s the mastery of fear. It’s about getting up one more time than we fall down.” ― Arianna Huffington

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Arianna Huffington is the editor-in-chief of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Huffington Post. She is also the author of 14 books. She started the Huffington Post in 2005 at the age of 55. She was able to run the company successfully to the point where she sold it to AOL for more than $300 million while still being retained as the editor-in-chief of the organization.

Harland Sanders, Kentucky Fried Chicken

You got to like your work. You have got to like what you are doing, you have got to be doing something worthwhile so you can like it – because it is worthwhile, that it makes a difference, don’t you see? – Colonel Sanders

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Popularly known as Colonel Sanders and the face behind Kentucky Fried Chicken, started his career as a restaurateur when he was 62. He had worked as a fireman, at gas stations and as an insurance sales man. Later on, he found fulfillment in serving his beloved chicken dishes. He had started out trading his cooking skills for free rent. However it didn’t take long for news about his incredible chicken to spread.

Wally Amos, Famous Amos Cookies

“Believe that you can do it, under any circumstances. Because if you believe you can, then you really will. That belief just keeps you searching for the answers, then pretty soon you get it.”  ― Wally Amos

Wally Amos had worked in the New York City mailroom and became a music agent and manager of stars such as Mavin Gaye and the Supremes before starting his company Famous Amos cookies. Making cookies was something he found fulfillment in doing and the opportunity to start this venture only happened after he was loaned $25, 000. He opened his first bakery just when he was about to turn 40 and within five years he was making about $12 million per year.

Featured photo credit: 05-23-2012 Arianna Huffington @ C2-MTL © CHARLES WILLIAM PELLETIER / C2 Montréal via flickr.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Published on March 26, 2019

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

Embarking on a career change, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Regardless of the reason for your desired career change, you need to be very clear on ‘why’ you are making a change. This is essential because you need to have clarity and be confident in your career direction in order to convince employers why you are best suited for the new role or industry.

A well crafted career change cover letter can set the tone and highlight your professional aspirations by showcasing your personal story.

1. Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can feel daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. You can take control and change careers successfully by doing research and making informed decisions.

Getting to know people, jobs, and industries through informational interviews is one of the best ways to do this.[1] Investing time to gather information from multiple sources will alleviate some fears for you to actually take action and make a change.

Here are some questions to help you refine your ‘why’, seek clarity, and better explain your career change:

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  • What makes me content?
  • How do I want work to impact my life?
  • What’s most important to me right now?
  • How committed am I to make a career change?
  • What do I need more of to feel satisfied at work?
  • What do I like to do so much that I lose track of time?
  • How can I start to explore my career change options?
  • What do I dislike about my current role or work environment?

2. Introduction: Why Are You Writing This Cover Letter?

Make this section concise. Cite the role that you are applying for and include other relevant information such as the posting number, where you saw the posting, the company name, and who referred you to the role, if applicable.

Sample:

I am applying for the role of Client Engagement Manager posted on . Please find attached relevant career experiences on my resume.

3. Convince the Employer: Why Are You the Best Candidate for the Role?

Persuade the employer that you are the best person for the role. Use this section to show that you: have read the job posting, understand how your skills contribute to the needs of the company, and can address the challenges of the company.

Tell your personal story and make it easy for hiring managers to understand the logic behind your career change. Clearly explaining the reason for your career change will show how thoughtful and informed your decision-making process is of your own transition.

Be Honest

Explain why you are making a career change. This is where you will spend the bulk of your time crafting a clear message.

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Speak to the mismatch that may be perceived by hiring managers, between the experience shown on your resume and the job posting, to show why your unique strengths make you more qualified than other candidates.

Address any career gaps on our resume. What did you do or learn during those periods that would be an asset to the role and company?

Sample:

I have been a high school English and Drama educator for over 7 years. In efforts to develop my career in a new direction, I have invested more time outside the classroom to increase community engagement by building a strong network of relationships to support school programs. This includes managing multiple stakeholder interests including local businesses, vendors, students, parents, colleagues, the Board, and the school administration.

Highlight Relevant Accomplishment

Instead of repeating what’s on your resume, let your personality shine. What makes you unique? What are your strengths and personal characteristics that make you suited for the job?

Sample:

As a joyful theater production manager, I am known to be an incredible collaborator. My work with theater companies have taught me the ability to work with diverse groups of people. The theater environment calls for everyone involved to cooperate and ensure a successful production. This means I often need to creatively and quickly think on my feet, and use a bit of humour to move things forward to meet tight timelines.

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Feature Your Transferable Skills

Tap into your self-awareness to capture your current skills.[2]

Be specific and show how your existing skills are relevant to the new role. Review the job posting and use industry specific language so that the hiring manager can easily make the connection between your skills and the skills that they need.

Sample:

As the first point of contact for students, parents, and many community stakeholders, I am able to quickly resolve problems in a timely and diplomatic manner. My problem solving aptitude and strong negotiation skills will be effective to address customer issues effectively. This combined with my planning, organization, communication, and multitasking skills makes me uniquely qualified for the role of Client Engagement Manager to ensure that customers maintain a positive view of .

4. Final Pitch and Call-To-Action: Why Do You Want to Work for This Company?

Here’s your last chance to show what you have to offer! Why does this opportunity and company excite you? Show what value you’ll add to the company.

Remember to include a call-to-action since the whole point of this letter is to get you an interview!

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Sample:

_________ is a global leader in providing management solutions to diverse clients. I look forward to an opportunity to discuss how my skills and successful experience managing multiple stakeholders can help build and retain strong customer relationships as the Client Engagement Manager.

Summing It Up

Remember these core cover letter tips to help you effectively showcase your personal brand:

  • Keep your writing clear and concise. You have one page to express yourself so make every word count.
  • Do your research to determine ‘who’ will be reading your letter. Understanding your audience will help you better persuade them that you are best suited for the role.
  • Tailor your cover for each job posting by including the hiring manager’s name, and the company name and address. Make it easy on yourself and create your own cover letter template. Highlight or alter the font color of all the spots that need to be changed so that you can easily tailor it for the next job application.
  • Get someone else to review your cover letter. At a minimum, have someone proofread it for grammar and spelling errors. Ideally, have someone who is well informed about the industry or with hiring experience to provide you with insights so that you can fine-tune your career change cover letter.

Check out these Killer Cover Letter Samples that got folks interviews!

It is very important that you clarify why you are changing careers. Your career exploration can take many forms so setting the foundation by knowing ‘why’ not only helps you develop a well thought out career change cover letter, [3] but can also help you create an elevator pitch, build relationships, tweak your LinkedIn profile and during interviews.

Remember to focus on your transferable skills and use your collective work experience to show how your accomplishments are relevant to the new role. Use the cover letter to align your abilities with the needs of the employer as your resume will likely not provide the essential context of your career change.

Ensure that your final pitch is concise and that your call-to action is strong. Don’t be afraid to ask for an interview or to meet the hiring manager in-person!

More Resources About Career Change

Featured photo credit: Christin Hume via unsplash.com

Reference

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