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19 Reasons Why Grammar Nerds Are More Likely To Be Successful

19 Reasons Why Grammar Nerds Are More Likely To Be Successful

As a grammar nerd, you’re sometimes mocked for your large vocabulary and appropriate use of syntax. It’s tough always being right in a sea full of wrong, especially when other people try to bring you down. However, that’s no reason to become discouraged.

Own your title of “Grammar Nerd.” It’s an honorable distinction that sets you apart from the rest. It may also be a predictor of your current or future success. Here are 19 reasons why grammar nerds are more likely to be successful.

1. They are perfectionists

Grammar nerds work their tails off until everything is perfect. Who cares that you haven’t slept in 56 hours as long as everything is where it’s supposed to be? Perfectionism is an important trait for many highly successful people. Rejoice!

2. They pay attention to detail

Grammar nerds pay attention to every detail when reading, writing, or speaking. That focus flows into everything else they do. If you’re going to be successful, you have to pay attention to the details. Who knows when that one little thing will be the make-or-break factor to accomplishing your dreams?

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3. They know how to articulate their thoughts

Grammar nerds are so good with syntax that they’re better able to say exactly what they mean, and mean exactly what they say. This is huge when it comes to sales, meetings, growth, leadership, parenting, and everything involved in being successful.

4. They care about the little things

Grammar nerds care. It’s not just that they pay attention to details, it’s that they genuinely care about the little things. After all, big things are just a lot of little things put together, which makes them rather important.

5. They have better writing skills

Grammar nerds can focus on the details without getting lost. With their superior writing skills, grammar nerds are better at proposals, assignments, their own resumés, and general communication skills, giving them a leg up along the path to success.

6. They utilize rules creatively

Grammar nerds know the rules backwards and forwards. They know what’s normally done, as well as what can be done creatively without breaking the rules. Instead of thinking inside the box, they use the box as a tool for progress — a critical skill for being successful.

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7. They analyze everything

Grammar nerds analyze and re-analyze everything you put in front of or say to them. If you’re going to be successful, you have to scrutinize every little detail. No one ever became successful without having an analytical mind.

8. They have sharper minds

Grammar nerds are great at quick assessments, a symptom of a sharp mind. Because they think more swiftly, they’re able to learn and improve quickly, giving them a notable edge on the success front.

9. They are incredibly organized

Grammar nerds know that everything has a purpose and a place. A more organized life means minds that function more clearly than those who are disorganized, which is rather impactful when you’re striving for success.

10. They give better impressions of themselves

Grammar nerds pay more attention to detail, giving them the upper hand when it comes to making impressions. Everything from how you carry yourself to the specific words you say affect others’ views of you. Because it’s about who you know rather than what you know, grammar nerds’ abilities to leave better impressions give them another leg up.

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11. They think things through thoroughly before finalizing anything

Grammar nerds are programmed to edit and re-edit everything before declaring it final. This habit of thoroughly proofing every minor thing is foundational to long-term success.

12. They believe in doing things right

Grammar nerds are the embodiment of doing the right things the right way at the right time, which just so happens to be a very important thing when it comes to success.

13. They have high standards for themselves and others

Grammar nerds have higher standards than their colleagues, whether while working or for life in general. They push themselves to surpass those high standards, and expect those around them to do the same. This constant push to improve is another marker of success.

14. They are great conversationalists

Grammar nerds know their respective languages far better than most. They have a larger vocabulary and a stronger grasp of syntax, making them better conversationalists. This pays off massively through sales, networking, negotiating, and managing — among other things — all of which are important to gaining success.

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15. They understand that it’s what you say and how you say it

Grammar nerds know that inflection and proper phrasing are key to communication, and that communication is key to furthering yourself in whatever you do. They present things how others want to see or hear them, helping them to gain favor and making them more likely to be successful.

16. They work harder

Grammar nerds spend more time in deep focus — it’s not easy making everything perfect all the time. Their innate work ethic propels them high above their colleagues, causing them to reach success more quickly.

17. They are great leaders

Grammar nerds know how to communicate in a way that helps others improve — a primary characteristic of great leaders. They’re able to handle situations and conversations in ways that others agree and respect, creating a solid foundation for success.

18. They can handle more work

Grammar nerds can take on a heavier load. They’re accustomed to taking and improving upon others’ words and ideas, increasing their general workload. Because they are able to work more without fatiguing, they are more likely to be successful.

19. They work well independently

Grammar nerds are incredibly self-motivated. They spend plenty of time away from others, motivating themselves to work. This inner drive to work well catapults them forward along the path to success.

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Kenneth Burke

Director of Marketing

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Last Updated on April 6, 2020

10 Powerful Ways to Influence People Positively

10 Powerful Ways to Influence People Positively

Most discussions on positively influencing others eventually touch on Dale Carnegie’s seminal work, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Written more than 83 years ago, the book touches on a core component of human interaction, building strong relationships. It is no wonder why.

Everything that we do hinges on our ability to connect with others and formulate deep relationships. You cannot sell a house, buy a house, advance in most careers, sell a product, pitch a story, teach a course, etc. without building healthy relationships. Managers get the best results from their teams, not through brute force, but to careful appeals to their sensibilities, occasional withdrawals from the reservoir of respect they’ve built. Using these tactics, they can influence others to excellence, to productivity, and to success.

Carnegie’s book is great. Of course, there are other resources too. Most of us have someone in our lives who positively influences us. The truth is positively influencing people is about centering the humanity of others. Chances are, you know someone who is really good at making others feel like stars. They can get you to do things that the average person cannot. Where the requests of others sound like fingernails on a chalkboard, the request from this special person sounds like music to your ears. You’re delighted to not only listen but also to oblige.

So how to influence people in a positive way? Read on for tips.

1. Be Authentic

To influence people in a positive way, be authentic. Rather than being a carbon copy of someone else’s version of authenticity, uncover what it is that makes you unique.

Discover your unique take on an issue and then live up to and honor that. Once of the reasons social media influencers are so powerful is that they have carved out a niche for themselves or taken a common issue and approached it from a novel or uncommon way. People instinctually appreciate people whose public persona matches their private values.

Contradictions bother us because we crave stability. When someone professes to be one way, but lives contrary to that profession, it signals that they are confused or untrustworthy and thereby, inauthentic. Neither of these combinations bode well for positively influencing others.

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2. Listen

Growing up, my father would tell me to listen to what others said. He told me if I listened carefully, I would know all I needed to know about a person’s character, desires and needs.

To positively influence others, you must listen to what is spoken and what is left unsaid. Therein lies the explanation for what people need in order to feel validated, supported and seen. If a person feels they are invisible, and unseen by their superiors, they are less likely to be positively influenced by that person.

Listening meets a person’s primary need of validation and acceptance.

Take a look at this guide on how to be a better listener: How to Practice Active Listening (A Step-By-Step Guide)

3. Become an Expert

Most people are predisposed to listen to, if not respect, authority. If you want to positively influence others, become an authority in the area in which you seek to lead others. Research and read everything you can about the given topic, and then look for opportunities to put your education into practice.

You can argue over opinions. You cannot argue, or it is unwise to argue, over facts and experts come with facts.

4. Lead with Story

From years of working in the public relations space, I know that personal narratives, testimonials and impact stories are incredibly powerful. But I never cease to be amazed with how effective a well-timed and told story can be.

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If you want to influence people, learn to tell stories. Your stories should be related to the issue or concept you are discussing. They should be an analogy or metaphor that explains your topic in ordinary terms and in vivid detail. To learn more about how to tell powerful stories, and the ethics of storytelling, take a look at this article: How To Tell An Interesting Story In 4 Simple Steps

5. Lead by Example

It is incredibly inspiring to watch passionate, talented people at work or play. One of the reasons a person who is not an athlete can be in awe of athletic prowess is because human nature appreciates the extraordinary. When we watch the Olympics, Olympic trials, gymnastic competitions, ice skating, and other competitive sports, we can recognize the effort of people who day in and day out give their all. C

ase in point: Simone Biles. The gymnast extraordinaire won her 6TH all-around title at the U.S. Gymnastics Championships after doing a triple double. She was the first woman to do so. Watching her gave me chills. Even non-gymnasts and non-competitive athletes can appreciate the talent required to pull off such a remarkable feat.

We celebrate remarkable accomplishments and believe that their example is proof that we too can accomplish something great, even if it isn’t qualifying for the Olympics. To influence people in a positive way, we must lead by example, lead with intention and execute with excellence.

6. Catch People Doing Good

A powerful way to influence people in a positive way is to catch people doing good. Instead of looking for problems, look for successes. Look for often overlooked, but critically important things that your peers, subordinates and managers do that make the work more effective and more enjoyable.

Once you catch people doing good, name and notice their contributions.

7. Be Effusive with Praise

It did not take me long to notice a remarkable trait of a former boss. He not only began and ended meetings with praise, but he peppered praise throughout the entire meeting. He found a way to celebrate the unique attributes and skills of his team members. He was able to quickly and accurately assess what people were doing well and then let them and their colleagues know.

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Meetings were not just an occasion to go through a “To Do” list, they were opportunities to celebrate accomplishments, no matter how small they are.

8. Be Kind Rather Than Right

I am going to level with you; this one is tough. It is easy to get caught up in a cycle of proving oneself. For people who lack confidence, or people who prioritize the opinions of others, being right is important. The validation that comes with being perceived as “right” feeds one’s ego. But in the quest to be “right,” we can hurt other people. Once we’ve hurt someone by being unkind, it is much harder to get them to listen to what we’re trying to influence them to do.

The antidote to influencing others via bullying is to prioritize kindness above rightness. You can be kind and still stand firm in your position. For instance, many people think that they need others to validate their experience. If a person does not see the situation you experienced in the way you see it, you get upset. But your experience is your experience.

If you and your friends go out to eat and you get food poisoning, you do not need your friends to agree that the food served at the restaurant was problematic for you. Your own experience of getting food poisoning is all the validation you need. Therefore, taking time to be right is essentially wasted and, if you were unkind in seeking validation for your food-poison experience, now you’ve really lost points.

9. Understand a Person’s Logical, Emotional and Cooperative Needs

The Center for Creative Leadership has argued that the best way to influence others is to appeal to their logical, emotional and cooperative needs. Their logical need is their rational and educational need. Their emotional need is the information that touches them in a deeply personal manner. The cooperative need is understanding the level of cooperation various individuals need and then appropriately offering it.

The trick with this system is to understand that different people need different things. For some people, a strong emotional appeal will outweigh logical explanations. For others, having an opportunity to collaborate will override emotional connection.

If you know your audience, you will know what they need in order to be positively influenced. If you have limited information about the people whom you are attempting to influence, you will be ineffective.

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10. Understand Your Lane

If you want to positively influence others, operate from your sphere of influence. Operate from your place of expertise. Leave everything else to others. Gone are the days when being a jack of all trades is celebrated.

Most people appreciate brands that understand their target audience and then deliver on what that audience wants. When you focus on what you are uniquely gifted and qualified to do, and then offer that gift to the people who need it, you are likely more effective. This effectiveness is attractive.

You cannot positively influence others if you are more preoccupied by what others do well versus what you do well.

Final Thoughts

Influencing people is about centering your humanity. If you want to influence others positively, focus on the way you communicate and improve the relationship with yourself first.

It’s hard to influence others if you’re still trying to figure out how to communicate with yourself.

More Tips About Making Influence

Featured photo credit: Wonderlane via unsplash.com

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