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8 Reasons Why Travelers Make Better Lovers

8 Reasons Why Travelers Make Better Lovers

While traveling is renowned as a fun and educational experience that enables us to grow as individuals, it can also be arduous at times. From unexpected delays and climate changes to the significant challenges posed by alternative cultures, regular traveling demands a number of attributes and personal characteristics.

These personal traits enable fortunate individuals to travel the world and soak up a wealth of experience. This, in turn, helps them to develop as people, as they learn how to become better communicators, achieve a better understanding of those around them and establish a keen sense of independence.

These traits are also pivotal in any relationship, and tend to distinguish individuals as superior lovers. With this in mind, let’s look at exactly why travelers are more likely to maintain romantic affiliations.

1. They are self-assured and have discovered their purpose

Travel can often be described as a journey of self-discovery, especially for younger individuals who take to the road to develop a greater understanding of their future purpose in life.

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This breeds an innate sense of self-confidence and assurance, meaning that travelers have a greater appreciation of their self-worth and are less likely to develop feelings of insecurity during a relationship. As a result of their experiences and constant learning, travellers are also likely to be on a path of continual self-improvement as they grow older.

2. They are more grateful and appreciative

As travelers have enjoyed such unique and diverse experiences, they tend to be grateful for the life that they have lived and the people that they have encountered.

Those who have ventured to developing countries will also have seen the true nature of hardship, meaning that they have a greater sense of perspective and appreciation, thanks to the opportunities that they have been afforded.

Such an outlook tends to make travelers contented and more appreciative of their partners, which in turn creates a more stable and ultimately prosperous relationship.

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3. They are more willing to settle down

The course of true love hardly ever runs smooth, although relationships can be complicated by conflicting needs and long-term aspirations. While one partner may be ready to settle down and commit to a serious adult relationship, for example, the other may be reluctant due to a lack of life experience or a sense of unfulfilled adolescence.

Due to the intense and incredible experiences offered by life on the road, however, travelers are much more likely to feel fulfilled and therefore more open to a committed, settled relationship. This instantly makes them better and more reliable romantic partners.

4. They are flexible and open to change

Relationships are evolutionary and liable to change, both in terms of the status of individual partners and long-term goals. This requires a certain amount of flexibility and receptiveness to change, as this enables you to ‘go with the flow’ and place a positive slant on even difficult circumstances.

Travelers have these attributes in abundance, as while they may plan extensively when traveling abroad or visiting remote corners of the world, they retain a sense of adaptability and are equipped to cope with unexpected events.

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5. They are more optimistic

This willingness to be flexible also lends itself to a more optimistic outlook, as it enables individuals to embrace hardship and seek out an unexpected positive.

Given the challenging nature of relationships and the negative feeling that can be triggered by arguments, insensitivity and even infidelity, the ability to remain positive and look towards a brighter future is absolutely critical to any long-term relationship.

In this respect, travelers make the ideal partnership, as they will always focus on positive aspects of the relationship and use these as building blocks for the future.

6. They make for better listeners

Even though experienced travellers may be multi-lingual, when they first hit the road they may well have lacked this skill. This means that they will have spent a period of time honing their linguistic skills, while also working hard to understand alternative languages and listening intently to what others are saying. This is a habit that is easily carried on into later life, meaning that travellers are likely to be superior listeners who are capable of processing information and understanding the fundamental needs of their partners. The ability to listen can prevent distressing arguments, while also enabling couples to develop a deeper understanding of one another.

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7. They are respectful of those around them

One of the great distinctions between travelers and tourists is that the former learn to be respectful of opposing cultures and values. This is a prerequisite for regular travel, as otherwise, individuals would run the risk of greatly offending locals or acting in a way that opposes their customs.

As a result of this, travelers tend to be exceptionally respectful and sensitive to the feelings of those around them, enabling them to contribute positively to any romantic liaison. The importance of this cannot be ignored, especially as a lack of mutual respect can undermine any relationship.

8. They find it easier to learn

Traveling is one of the most immersive pastimes that you can enjoy as an adult, as it plunges you into a number of far-flung locations and exposes you to unique experiences. This inspires a hunger for knowledge and learning, which travelers can only satisfy through an inquisitive and ultimately passionate nature.

Such fire and fervor makes travelers the ideal lovers, as they have no issues with committing fully to a relationship or learning continually about their partners. Relationships with those who have traveled are, therefore, more intense and fulfilling, while there may also be a greater sense of passion.

Featured photo credit: SplitShire – Pixabay via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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