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What To Do If You’re Always An Option But Never A Priority

What To Do If You’re Always An Option But Never A Priority

There are times when you realize you are an option and not a priority, and if you don’t realize it, you are haunted by the thought.

When you get together with a certain someone, you feel like the third wheel or the last one invited to the party.  You are the plus one.  Maybe you suspect you are some last minute arrangement.  Sometimes you may feel like you are being edged out by some invisible force, like a new, more interesting version of you with more time or more money or fewer problems.

I’ve been there, too, too many times.  I have been the understanding girlfriend, the accommodating wife, the forgiving sister and the easy-going friend.  I would make excuses like, “Well, they are just a) busy b) stressed c) going through a rough time or d) in a weird place right now.”  And sometimes these things could have been true.  I would tell myself I needed to be less self-centered, egocentric or needy, which sounded healthy.  I’d go over what I didn’t do right.  I’d try to be THE better person and give them a pass.  I’d try to be a better person more worthy of their attentions and affections.

But after exhausting myself, I had to come to terms:  I had allowed myself to become “the option person” in life.   And although we can’t make people make us a priority, we do have the power to enable ourselves to become a “priority person” in life.  And here is how it can be done by you and me.

1. Make yourself and your needs a priority

I know it might sound counter-intuitive to you, but the truth is people like you because you make them the priority and they don’t have to make you a priority.  By indulging yourself, doing what you want, when you want, how you want, even if you are alone while doing it, you are really carving out your own dominion.

The people who want to make you a priority will come to your kingdom or they can play elsewhere.

If you are a very giving person, you will have a hard time with this.  If necessary, get a pet or a garden going that needs you to make them a priority.  You will fulfill your need to be giving in a healthy way that doesn’t set up these relationships where you are second best.

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But truly, you need to start living for yourself, not for another person.

2. Recognize the users in your life, even if they are family

It is difficult to identify and then distance yourself from the users in your life, especially if it is family members who have been the ones who have taught you since birth through their actions that you and your wants aren’t very important.  It could be that they have their own emotional baggage, and you can be compassionate about it, but if they are repeatedly enforcing the message that you are not good enough or that your needs shouldn’t come first, then you have to take a step back from them when the time is right for you.

Someone taught you to be the “option person,” and you have to get real about who that person or those people are.  It will be life altering when you take the blinders off.  Promise.

3. List the value of you

It may sound dopey, but for all the time you might spend criticizing and putting yourself down, you at the least need to make a mental lists of your valuable assets.  You have them.  You have your funny side, your compassionate side, your loving side, your nurturing side, your smart side, your hard-working side, and so many other sides.  List them.  Pin them up on a mirror.  Every day we spend time looking in mirrors to check out our face, teeth, and clothes.  Have some internal, introspective, beneath-the-surface qualities that demonstrate you are worthy.  Chances are you’ve forgotten some.

After internalizing your list, you’ll notice better when others don’t appreciate you, and you’ll know sooner to stop wasting emotional energy on them or to re-prioritize them as an option person, too.

4. Invest yourself in a worthy cause

I don’t think we think about volunteering and charity as a self-help tool, but it can be.  If you are a giving person, give to a cause that will benefit from your good works.  Don’t dump your energy into people who are not valuing you.  It does no good.  But do give yourself to helping others and causes you care about, you will be doing something of value.

And just think of it, you just added another reason you are a valuable, worthy person.  Viola!

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5. Don’t turn back!

It is difficult for me not to look back on the good times with people and not think better times will come around, but realistically, you shouldn’t turn back.  Once you have realized you are the option, not the priority, a priority person will not look back or go back to being the option person.  It will hurt.  I haven’t had the experience where someone wanted to know what went wrong and try to work on things. I’ve either gotten silence or a caustic list of how I am the cause of all wrong.  So unless you want to be the doormat or someone’s whipping dog or slip back into being just an option, you have to move forward.

Hope is a really great thing unless it is distorting your reality and derailing your future.

6. Believe that better people and better things are just ahead!

Reading over other online posts, the number one reason people get stuck being an option and are unable to make themselves a priority is because they don’t believe there is someone or something better just ahead.  Maybe few people want to admit it, but it seems a lot of drama is coming out of the idea that they are “meant to be” with a certain someone:  Giving up on that person is giving up on love. Giving up means breaking our word. We promised. We committed. We must remain faithful and true to the end. We must go down with the ship!

But the thing is, once the other person has given up on love, stopped trying, started investing themselves elsewhere, the love stopped existing.  Once the friendship was left behind, it withered and died.  Relationships, like plants, need things to live and more care to thrive.  Hanging on to someone or something because of a story you told yourself a few years ago is going to take away the best things in your life:  your possibilities and your future.

As cliche as it is, it is true:  every ending is something else’s beginning.  And if you have worked on yourself and your priorities, the right people and opportunities will show themselves.

7. Stay fluid and continue to make new friends

One of the reasons high school can be terrible or some job can be awful is because we get stuck with the same people and the same routines.  Nothing new or interesting happens unless someone new comes into the group. But instead of waiting for someone new to come to you, like “option people” do, you need to go out and meet new people, make new friends and contacts, and expand your horizons.  As an “option person” you probably fenced yourself in.  You maybe even lost touch with other people because you were trying to stay available for that other person or because you allowed yourself to get sucked into all their plans having none of your own.

Even the worst dating article I read had a truth in it; no one will make you a priority until you make them show you are a priority.

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And if you are hanging around hoping that certain someone will finally give you the metaphoric red roses you deserve, you have turned your back on the person who is already ready to do so.  So drop off that other person’s radar.  If they come around, great.  If they don’t, which is more likely, even better.  Because to tell you the truth, it seems me many want second chances because they can get third, fourth, and fifth ones too.  How tiresome are they?  Let them learn the hard way.  Don’t continue to be their soft landing spot in life.

8. Be direct with what you want from the relationship

This may send you into panic mode, and if it does, I’m sorry.  But really, if you don’t like being an option and you don’t like being taken for granted and if you want more, you have to have “the talk.”  I know this is the best thing and should be probably number one.  It probably makes all the other stuff I’ve said non-issues.  And I know for a lot of people it will be like scheduling a root canal and then showing up to find out they are out of laughing gas.  But in some ways, it isn’t much more effort than number one, making yourself and your needs a priority.  But you have to actually communicate them to the someone significant in your life, or the someone you wish to become significant in your life.

You may even need your list of value in hand, to remind yourself you are worth it.

9. Be okay with being on your own without turning into a hermit or emotionally shallow

You may be hanging on and becoming comfortable with being an option person largely because you are more afraid of being alone and feeling lonely. Or you are more comfortable with the lack of intimacy in your relationship.  Or you’re afraid of intimacy. Sometimes distant relationships or relationships that come and go easily aren’t because they are these great, epic friendships where people are so perfectly comfortable with each other they can pick up where they started.  Sometimes they work because the people in these relationships lack emotional depth or are avoiding long-term intimacy that requires accountability.  You want to keep your depth, your ability to connect emotionally with someone, and to be able to be held equally accountable in a long-term relationship.  So while you need to be able to weather life on your own, you don’t want to become so comfortable that you lose you ability to have a meaningful relationship.

Meaningful relations are all about being a priority.

So while you need to be able to weather life on your own so you won’t settle or hang-on to the wrong people, you don’t want to become so comfortable that you lose you ability to have a meaningful relationship.

10. Allow yourself to be a little high-maintenance

I mention this one lastly because I believe many of you option people have tried so hard in life to be the accommodating one or to please someone or not to be upsetting or to be demanding in any way.  I’ve had people try to make it out like I was being high maintenance as a strategic move to get me to be the jellyfish friend or the sad-sap girlfriend they needed.  I’ve made friendships and relationships all about the other person, and sometimes I thought I was doing the right thing at the time.

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Most people need to work on number nine and quit trying to use people as their crutches, their door mats, or their whipping dogs.  People don’t need other people as much as they need to quit using each other and get right with themselves.  So sometimes, do yourself the favor, be high-maintenance, make some demands, and be able to let them and yourself walk alone.

There are times when we won’t and can’t be a priority to someone else we deeply care about, legitimate reasons like they have a very young child or an aged parent who is very ill.  There are times when we have to be understanding about the demands of an occupation like if the person works shifts or has to work with people in different time zones.  We have to know their passions and how this will impact the relationship.  It the legitimate reasons are for real and are not just subterfuge or out-and-out lies, you could be doing the right thing by staying open, accommodating, and flexible.

But if the other person is communicating to you that your are not worth being a priority, then feel free to walk on.

And of course, you may just need more than the other person can give.

So believe you will find yourself a worthy partner who will want to walk beside you not one who would have you chasing their shadow.

Featured photo credit: outdoor portrait of young model via shutterstock.com

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Last Updated on February 11, 2021

Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

Perceptual Barrier

The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

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The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

Attitudinal Barrier

Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

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The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

Language Barrier

This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

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Emotional Barrier

Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

Cultural Barrier

Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

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The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

Gender Barrier

Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

Reference

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