Advertising
Advertising

8 Great Things About Face-to-Face Communication Most People Don’t Do Anymore Because of Technology

8 Great Things About Face-to-Face Communication Most People Don’t Do Anymore Because of Technology

For those of you who are under 30, you might not even remember a time when people didn’t constantly check their phones for texts, Facebook/Instagram/Twitter profiles, when they’re in someone else’s physical presence. Even talking on the phone has become a lost art for many people these days.

While we’re all in favor of technological advances, sometimes you have to mourn the loss of real communication, the kind that makes you feel good. You know, the kind that doesn’t require an electronic object to deliver your message.

Here are eight great things about face-to-face communication that most people don’t just don’t seem to do anymore thanks to the ever growing technology of our time.

1. Looking into each other’s eyes.

And no, we’re not talking about looking at someone’s eyes in a selfie on Facebook or Instagram. We’re talking about having their eyes just inches or mere feet away from yours.

Advertising

When you look into someone’s eyes, it connects the two of you. Sometimes it’s almost like you’re looking deep into their souls. You just can’t get that when someone texts you a photo of themselves. It’s just not the same.

2. Touching someone’s hand.

Body language comprises 80-90% of the real meaning of a message. But using technology to talk doesn’t give you the opportunity to reach out and touch someone (and no, we’re not talking about “Ma Bell” … which most young people probably don’t even know about).

Giving a hug, playfully giving an elbow jab, or touching someone to say, “I care”, is just something that can’t be done over Facebook.

3. Having someone’s full attention.

Nothing says, “you don’t matter to me” as much as being with someone who constantly checks their texts or picks up the phone when they’re with you. Instead, it says, “hold on – this person is more important than you.”

Advertising

While it may have become the “new normal” to do that, it is still disrespectful. What ever happened to the Golden Rule? If you want someone to pay attention to you, then you need to do the same – and put your phone away!

4. Receiving support & understanding.

Imagine sending a good friend of yours a long email asking for advice about something. No matter the content, you can’t help but think, “This would be so much better if I was actually looking at him face-to-face so I could explain it better.”

But because you live far enough apart where it’s not possible to see each other that often, you resort to email. Even the phone would be better that an email response. Sure, you’ll still get that sage advice, but nothing beats the interaction with your live human friend.

5. Growing your mind with deep conversation.

Talking about celebrity gossip and the funny cat video you just saw on Facebook can be fun, but it doesn’t help you become a better person. Talking with someone face-to-face helps you get into some pretty deep conversations.

Advertising

You can learn about yourself, the other person, or something you never knew before. Have you ever tried to get into a deep conversation over text? Well, not everyone’s fingers work as fast as others’! You could cover a lot more ground and in half the time if you can jut have discussions face-to-face.

6. Flirting.

Okay, admit it. How many of you have received texts or emails from someone you’re romantically interested in and thought, “Oh my…what did he/she mean by that?” Then you’re texting you best friend saying, “Okay, he said this .. what did it mean? Does he like me or is he just being nice because he ended his sentence with a smiley face?”

It’s better to see his or her real smiley face in person though. Messages are so often misinterpreted when they aren’t spoken in someone’s physical presence.

7. Sharing your innermost thoughts and emotions.

It’s scary sometimes to pour your heart out. We risk rejection that way. And that’s probably why people “test the waters” with texting, emails, and social media messages. It’s easier to hide behind your phone or computer than it is to look into someone’s eyes and share your feelings.

Advertising

But it’s so much more rewarding to do that! Getting a text that says, “luv u” isn’t as satisfying as someone hugging you tight and whispering the words, “I love you” into your ear.

8. Having someone really “get” you.

The energy that is exchanged with people when they are face-to-face can really lift you up. Talking in person allows you to really dig deep and really get to know each other. And when people know you, they understand you. Even if you have differences, you still can “get” each other because you spent quality time with them…one-on-one…face-to-face.

Sure, today’s technology is exciting and important. But we can remember fondly the days of face-to-face interactions. Maybe you should try “traveling back in time” and re-creating what it was like to live when we all actually talked to each other! You might just like it.

More by this author

Carol Morgan

Dr. Carol Morgan is the owner of HerSideHisSide.com, a communication professor, dating & relationship coach, TV personality, speaker, and author.

20 Reasons Why Relationships Fail (And How to Avoid It) How to Deal With a Narcissist (And When You Should Move On) How to Deal With the 15 Most Common Marriage Problems 11 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak How to Deal With an Emotionally Unstable Partner

Trending in Communication

1 How to Not Be Sad When It Feels Like Everything Is Going Wrong 2 The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life 3 7 Reasons Why You’re Feeling Restless and Unmotivated 4 10 Things to Do If You’re Feeling Hopeless About Your Future 5 How to Be a Good Listener (And a Better Communicator)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 19, 2020

The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life

The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments—you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time. That’s why the art of saying no can be a game changer for productivity.

Requests for your time are coming in all the time—from family members, friends, children, coworkers, etc. To stay productive, minimize stress, and avoid wasting time, you have to learn the gentle art of saying no—an art that many people have problems with.

What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger, or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

However, it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here’s how to stop people pleasing and master the gentle art of saying no.

1. Value Your Time

Know your commitments and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it.

Be honest when you tell them that: “I just can’t right now. My plate is overloaded as it is.” They’ll sympathize as they likely have a lot going on as well, and they’ll respect your openness, honesty, and attention to self-care.

2. Know Your Priorities

Even if you do have some extra time (which, for many of us, is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time?

Advertising

For example, if my wife asks me to pick up the kids from school a couple of extra days a week, I’ll likely try to make time for it as my family is my highest priority. However, if a coworker asks for help on some extra projects, I know that will mean less time with my wife and kids, so I will be more likely to say no. 

However, for others, work is their priority, and helping on extra projects could mean the chance for a promotion or raise. It’s all about knowing your long-term goals and what you’ll need to say yes and no to in order to get there. 

You can learn more about how to set your priorities here.

3. Practice Saying No

Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word[1].

Sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.

4. Don’t Apologize

A common way to start out is “I’m sorry, but…” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important when you learn to say no, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm and unapologetic about guarding your time.

When you say no, realize that you have nothing to feel bad about. You have every right to ensure you have time for the things that are important to you. 

Advertising

5. Stop Being Nice

Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. However, if you erect a wall or set boundaries, they will look for easier targets.

Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.

6. Say No to Your Boss

Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss—they’re our boss, right? And if we start saying no, then we look like we can’t handle the work—at least, that’s the common reasoning[2].

In fact, it’s the opposite—explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.

7. Pre-Empting

It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting,

“Look, everyone, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects, and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”

This, of course, takes a great deal of awareness that you’ll likely only have after having worked in one place or been friends with someone for a while. However, once you get the hang of it, it can be incredibly useful.

Advertising

8. Get Back to You

Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, try saying no this way:

“After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.”

At least you gave it some consideration.

9. Maybe Later

If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say,

“This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].”

Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands. If you need to continue saying no, here are some other ways to do so[3]:

Advertising

Saying no the healthy way

    10. It’s Not You, It’s Me

    This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often, the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time.

    Simply say so—you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization—but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true, as people can sense insincerity.

    The Bottom Line

    Saying no isn’t an easy thing to do, but once you master it, you’ll find that you’re less stressed and more focused on the things that really matter to you. There’s no need to feel guilty about organizing your personal life and mental health in a way that feels good to you.

    Remember that when you learn to say no, isn’t about being mean. It’s about taking care of your time, energy, and sanity. Once you learn how to say no in a good way, people will respect your willingness to practice self-care and prioritization. 

    More Tips for a Less Stressful Life

    Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

    Reference

    Read Next