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10 Differences Between an Amateur Artist and a Professional Artist

10 Differences Between an Amateur Artist and a Professional Artist

As artists, we shouldn’t be careless with our works. Somehow we dedicate ourselves and want to show the world we are something. At the end our work is our legacy. Here are things that differentiate us from the amateurs.

1. An amateur never sticks to schedule; a professional is always on time.

“There are painters who transform the sun to a yellow spot, but there are others who, with the help of their art and their intelligence, transform a yellow spot into sun.”

—Pablo Picasso

An amateur artist only shows up when he feels like it. He doesn’t maintain a regular work ethic and is never consistent. But professionals put themselves to work on days they don’t feel like it. Whether they feel like it or not, they show up to work.

2. An amateur feels he is good enough; a professional knows he is never good enough.

“The artist is always beginning. Any work of art which is not a beginning, an invention, a discovery is of little worth.”

—Ezra Pound

While an amateur stagnates and becomes overconfident of his ability, a professional knows there is still a lot to learn and improve upon. Professionals empty themselves and want to get better at their craft and are never too proficient to accept corrections.

3. An amateur is in a hurry; a professional is always patient.

“Art doesn’t have to be pretty. It has to be meaningful.”

—Duane Hanson

An amateur wants to get the job done as quickly as possible. Sometimes this may mean they access seemingly shorter and unlawful routes to get them to their destination. But the professional knows that brilliance and excellence requires patience.

4. An amateur is easily distracted; a professional is focused on the goal.

“The whole culture is telling you to hurry, while the art tells you to take your time. Always listen to the art.”

—Junot Diaz

The professional wants to finish something and he will commit himself to completing a task before moving on to the next one. They are not distracted by doubters, negative talk or other exciting offers. They focus. But the amateur cannot finish one assignment before jumping to another one.

5. An amateur doesn’t connect; a professional connects.

“Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.”

—Thomas Merton

An amateur isolates himself from every other person within his network. He is arrogant and presumptuous and feels networking is not important. But the professional sees the need to network and connect with his peers to improve the quality of his art.

6. An amateur doesn’t take himself seriously; a professional sees his art as his reason for existence.

”When it is working, you completely go into another place, you’re tapping into things that are totally universal, completely beyond your ego and your own self. That’s what it’s all about.”

—Keith Haring

His art may be a hobby or simply a side thing. He doesn’t see it as a way to contribute to humanity and to existence. He is simply content with being known as a part-time artist. A professional breathes and lives his works. He cannot imagine doing any other thing or having another career.

7. An amateur believes in big outcomes; a professional doesn’t mind starting small.

“I am interested in art as a means of living a life; not as a means of making a living.”

—Robert Henri

An amateur wants quick gains and always believes he deserves more than he is getting. But a professional keeps on going regarding the outlook or prospects of his present commitment. He wants to get better and wants to offer the world something and it really is not about what the world has to offer him/her.

8. An amateur doesn’t pay attention to the detail; a professional is concerned about every detail.

”Creative work is not a selfish act or a bid for attention on the part of the actor. It’s a gift to the world and every being in it. Don’t cheat us of your contribution. Give us what you’ve got.”

—Steven Pressfield

An amateur wants to get the job done and doesn’t see how one piece of the artwork could make a difference. But the professional gives everything to a particular task and keeps on going to make sure the work shows his brilliance and class.

9. An amateur is concerned about what other people think; a professional is self aware.

“Art attracts us only by what it reveals of our most secret self.”

—Jean-Luc Godard

An amateur can’t really quantify his product. Rather the product quantifies him. He listens to critics and could be confused or dampened by their comments. The professional looks for self accomplishment first. He/she wants to feel validated from within rather than from the outer world.

10. An amateur waits for inspiration; a professional hunts for it.

“To draw, you must close your eyes and sing.”

—Pablo Picasso

An amateur is always waiting for everything to be perfect before he gets going. He complains that his “wow” moment is simply not coming often. The professional knows that inspiration exists everywhere. Because he is self aware, he knows how to tap into it.

Featured photo credit: http://www.flickr.com via flickr.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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