Advertising
Advertising

7 Random Facts You Didn’t Know About Driving

7 Random Facts You Didn’t Know About Driving

There is huge amount of knowledge available when we talk about the automobile world. For well over a hundred years, the automobile industry has changed the way we move around the world. Starting from the horseless carriages to fancy cars that touch top speeds in seconds, automobiles have come a long way from when they were first introduced. The first car was designed by Francois Isaac de Rivaz in 1807 and was powered by an internal combustion engine running on fuel gas.

The first modern automobile is generally considered to have been designed in 1886 by Karl Benz that featured wire wheels with a four-stroke engine fitted between the rear wheels. After 126 years, cars are still among our most pivotal obsessions. Not surprisingly, the last 126 years have delivered us prodigious automobile trivia.

Advertising

In this article I’ve gathered some of the most interesting car facts you probably did not know, so if you’re motor head or simply looking for some time to kill, as a minimum one of these facts will tickle your fancy.

1. In The USA, States Have Varying Laws On Seat Belts

Seat belt laws vary across states in America. These are split into two sections: primary seat belt laws whereby drivers and passengers can be ticketed for not wearing seat belts and secondary seat belt laws whereby drivers and passengers can only be ticketed for not wearing a belt if another traffic offense has also occurred.

Advertising

2. Driverless Cars Are Becoming A Reality

There are several entities attempting to create cars that can function without drivers. Google has created 10 different self-driving cars that have travelled a total of 300,000 miles on busy roads and have only resulted in 2 incidents, with one happening while a human was driving and one when another vehicle hit the car. It will be exciting to see the development of this technology and its implications on car related accidents.

3. The Largest Land Vehicle On Earth Weighs Over 45,000 Tons

The Bagger 288 excavator is the largest land vehicle in the world and was created to move massive amounts of earth. This excavator is over 300 feet tall, more than 700 feet long, and comes in at 45,500 tons.

Advertising

4. As Of 2010 There Are Currently More Than 1 Billion Vehicles Being Used On Earth

In research carried out by Ward in the US, it is estimated that in the year 2010, there were 1.015 billion vehicles being used in the world. These are all motor vehicles including cars, all trucks and buses. The figure does not include construction equipment such as tractors, or off-road vehicles.

5. An Estimated 60 Million Cars Are Made Each Year

In 2012 it was estimated that are over 60 million cars would be produced; a global first. This would equal 165,000 cars being manufactured on a daily basis. The 5 largest producing nations of vehicles are China, Japan, Germany, Soth Korea, and India in that order. China produced 24 percent of all the world’s cars in 2011 and over double Japan, the runner-up. In fact, China produced 4.88 more cars than the US (14.4 million to 2.9 million).

Advertising

6. The Average Car Has Thousands Of Parts

The average car is made up of around 30,000 parts, including each and every little piece that is in the resulting vehicle. It might seem unbelievable, but when you start calculating equipment like side panels and interior screws, you can imagine how the numbers will start to tally up. In addition to all those parts, a Mercedes-Benz car body is welded in 10,000 places. Car manufacturer companies like Mercedes are now even selling parts online through different vendors such as eEuroparts.com, which allow people to buy OEM parts with convenience.

7. One Horse Does Not Have One Horsepower

The number of “horsepower” advertised with cars considered as a basic unit of mechanical power of that particular vehicle that can be gaged in various ways. Some manufacturers involve converting one horsepower to 745 watts, or 33,000 foot-pounds of torque per minute in a physical conversion. According to these measurements, a real horse averages only about .7 horsepower.

Featured photo credit: Travis Wise via flickr.com

More by this author

Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

Top 25 Books to Unleash Your Creative Potential 10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders 25 Signs That You’re A Mentally Strong Person 10 Astonishing Benefits of Marmite That Will Turn Your Hatred Into Love 5 Fun Ways to Make Money Online That You Should Try

Trending in Productivity

1 How to Influence People and Make Them Feel Good 2 How to Be a Good Leader and Lead Effectively in Any Situation 3 Does the Pomodoro Technique Work for Your Productivity? 4 A Stress-Free Way To Prioritizing Tasks And Ending Busyness 5 4 Things Every True Leader Wants You to Know

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

Advertising

I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

Advertising

My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

Advertising

Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

Advertising

Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

Read Next