You’ve just been assigned a monster project at work or school.

You’re feeling a bit intimidated and rightly so…there’s a lot of work that needs to be done.

Where do you begin? How can you ensure your work moves along at an even pace and doesn’t fall through the cracks?

Here are seven tips that will help you take on that huge project like a productivity pro!

Plan slowly to move quickly.

Making plans before starting work on a project is always a good idea. An even better idea is to take the time to develop well-thought out and solid plans. Don’t just slap down a brief three-sentence plan and get to work! Get to the heart of your project by thinking about all the different components involved, including goals, targets, deliverables and tasks. Write down the general stages or sections for your project, and then work your way down to specific tasks. Create a first, second or third draft of your plans as necessary. The more thorough you are in your planning, the easier and quicker it will be to execute each specific task or item in future.

Build-in time for testing and reviewing.

Working on any project is difficult enough and you certainly don’t need the added stress of trying to find time for your project when you’re in the thick of things. As you develop your project’s plans, be sure to include time for you to test, review, proof and finalize your work or materials. Depending on the length and scope of your project, you may need to add in a couple of extra days, weeks or months. Even if you don’t use your time buffer for testing and reviewing purposes, you’ll still have the luxury of using this time to take care of any other loose ends related to your project.

Define and accept when something is good enough.

While you should be proud of the work you produce, being overly nitpicky and obsessive about the quality of your work when it’s perfectly fine as is won’t be much help to you if it makes you miss a deadline! There really is such as thing as work being just “good enough.” Set specific guidelines as to the features or aspects your project must have as a finished project and quantify information where necessary. When your project has reached your guidelines, it’s time to stop working on it, no ifs, ands or buts.

Make a clear division of labor.

Projects can become unnecessarily complex and confusing when roles and responsibilities aren’t properly spelled out. Take into account the people who will actually be working on the project. Who are the project managers, supervisors and staff? What are their roles? What specific tasks are people responsible for? Who should people report to if there is an issue or concern? Be sure to review your notes a couple of times to make sure items are not duplicated, repeated, or improperly assigned. It might also be helpful to have someone else take a look your notes to make sure you didn’t forget or overlook something.

Ask for help when you need it.

Even the best worker needs a bit of help now and then. If you are in need of help during a project, don’t be afraid to be vocal about it! Be specific in your request including what type of help you need, when you’ll need the help, where you’ll need the help and so on. You should also be sure to keep in touch with your helpers to make sure they are completing the assigned tasks as directed and address any questions they may have.

Keep communications clear.

Communication is key in any project. Lots of time can be wasted when information is misinterpreted, misread or misconstrued. Give instructions and directions in clear and simple terms so there’s no confusion. You should also strongly consider specifying communication methods people should use for a project, be it via in-person meetings, phone, text or email. This way, information can be communicated quickly and efficiently.

Document your progress.

You don’t have to create a full-blown status report each and every day as you are working on your project, but it is helpful to take general notes to track your progress. Write down what items have been completed, what issues came up as well as other concerns or snippets of information you’ve learned along the way. You’ll have a helpful reference tool to show you where you are in your project and how far you have to go until you complete it.

What concerns you the most when it comes to completing a large project? Leave a comment below.

Looking for some project management help? Check out these five helpful planning tools: 5 Awesome Project Management Tools to Get Your Team on Track

Featured photo credit: VFS Digital Design via flickr.com

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