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What Recruiters Pay Attention To For Your LinkedIn And Online Profile

What Recruiters Pay Attention To For Your LinkedIn And Online Profile

For recruiters, both professional and casual social media sites alike are very common sources for potential job candidates. When recruiters seek out the most ideal candidates for an interview or job offer, they use sites like LinkedIn and Facebook to gather information that – in addition to resumes – will contribute significantly to their hiring decision.

Of course, not every aspect of your online profile will be of concern to recruiters. Your number of friends or your relationship status will never more important than job-related areas like recommendations and personality, the latter of which is gathered through your consummate social media presence.

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1. Personality is Preferred

On LinkedIn, it’s recommended to limit news feed updates or conversations to a more professional standard. To attract the attention of job recruiters, you should join various LinkedIn groups in a field of your interest, while contributing quality interactions by commenting on news items in that group’s news feed. An example of quality interaction is sharing a niche-related infographic or news story. This will show recruiters that you are genuinely interested and knowledgeable in that particular field.

On Facebook, personality is expressed more naturally, via hobbies and conversations with friends. Via your privacy settings, most people have information like wall posts, friends and interactions set to private, so only friends can see. Doing this is fine even when job hunting, as job recruiters use Facebook more to validate personal interests through your liked pages. Some recruiters will browse through your photos to get a better assessment of your lifestyle, as well.

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2. Profile Completeness is Essential

Job recruiters like to see candidates that fill out every aspect of their profile. On LinkedIn, this is easy due to the site’s pop-up reminders that show your profile completion. Aim for 100% profile completeness, as this will look good to recruiters while also making your profile more searchable, which is another aspect that recruiters look for. If a recruiter sees that a job candidate has no or little online presence, they will very frequently perceive it as a weakness.

3. Recommendations and Endorsements Are Key

LinkedIn recommendations and endorsements are both highly-utilized bits of information by job recruiters, since it is the most accurate representation on social media of how the job candidate is perceived by his/her peers in specific fields. Endorsements are valuable because they elaborately express why the job candidate is qualified and easy to work with, while recommendations show how renowned that candidate is in specific fields and what their various talents are.

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4. Share Success Stories

Yes, recruiters want to see your job history. But they also want to see what you accomplished while there. Success stories are a great way to show why you are a valued employee. If possible, use numbers to emphasize your success in a particular role, such as “boosted overall sales by 50%” or “was directly responsible for the signing of 30 new clients in a one-month span.” This gives recruiters a way to quantify your success, which is useful when they are comparing potential job candidates.

5. A Professional Picture

Having a casual photo on Facebook is fine and expected. However, it’s recommended to use a professional looking photo on LinkedIn, as it will show recruiters that you take your professional life seriously. It’s not necessary to get a professional head shot done. Instead, look at employees’ LinkedIn accounts within the company you’d like to work at and use their photos as reference for your new head shot.

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Social media provides job recruiters more options than ever to fill positions, so it’s important to emphasize the points above to stand out from the rest of the pack. Doing so will ensure that your social media profiles are as visible and recruiter-friendly as possible so you can net your potential dream job.

Featured photo credit: Nan Palmero via flickr.com

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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