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How You Should Deliver Bad News To The Boss

How You Should Deliver Bad News To The Boss

Nobody likes to present bad news. Delivering bad news to a supervisor or your boss is always a scary situation. Even if you have a very good relationship with your boss, there are going to be some situations you probably feel uncomfortable with, such as disclosing bad news or any a mistake you have made.

By learning a few tips on how to present bad work-related news to your boss, you can save your work relationships rather than damage them. Giving someone bad news is never easy, but there are better and worse ways to do it.

Here are some ways to approach your boss with bad news.

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1. Prepare yourself emotionally.

Bad news can be stressful for anyone who is involved in the conversation. To manage this stress, it is important to prepare yourself .Take some time to calm your mind and think about what you want to say. If you do this, your emotions will be controlled. By speaking in a calm and clear manner, you will demonstrate that you are prepared and professional. As such, you are less likely to make the situation worse.  Avoid getting overly emotional or acting overly sympathetic. The news might be bad, but you are still at work and dealing with a superior, so conduct yourself accordingly. Remember that your attitude and the clarity of your message are two very important components in this conversation.

2. Tell only your boss.

Don’t deliver bad news casually or in passing. In other words, establish a situation and a context for the conversation, instead of just throwing it at someone. Don’t share the bad work news with your colleagues. It might make you feel better to rehearse how to tell your supervisor with someone else first, but the news should go to your boss directly. Leave it to the boss to decide whether the whole office needs to know.

3. Bring the whole story to the table.

When you tell your boss bad news, give him all the information. Skipping some details might seem like a good way to soften the blow, but your boss will need all the information in order to handle the situation properly and will appreciate your honesty.

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After you deliver bad news, you can explain reasons and causes. Precisely, you should explain what happened as well as the steps you took to minimize the risk. Your supervisor or boss would want to know this information, and he has a right to know it. Avoid including your opinion or advice when you deliver bad news, unless you are asked to share your thoughts or views. Without permission, adding your personal views is unprofessional and will not be helpful to your boss at this stage.

4. Get ready to answer the questions.

Get yourself prepared for the queries your boss could ask about the bad news you’re sharing or about potential solutions to the problematic situation. Make sure you are already aware of all the facts associated with the news, causes and possible techniques to correct the situation.

5. Stand unbiased and be an objective party.

Being biased and passing liability to others will not solve the problem. Instead, it will portray you as a negative and selfish person—the opposite of what you want.

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Identifying the responsible person behind the any bad situation isn’t necessary to solve the problem immediately. The best way to handle the situation is this: you should forget the reason until a solution has been found. Avoiding any allegations on the spot will helps you to avoid looking like you’re stabbing another employee in the back to save face.

6. Provide solutions.

Before you deliver bad news to your boss, contemplate possible ways to solve the problem. Try to discuss with your boss the specific steps you have already taken and express your ideas for getting fruitful results.

Remember, delivering bad news in a better way can certainly strengthen your relationship with colleagues. Hence, it’s certainly worth learning how to do it effectively! Don’t take the reaction of your supervisor or boss personally and remember that you’re just doing your job.

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Featured photo credit: huffpost.com via i.huffpost.com

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

15 Best Entrepreneurs Books to Start Reading Now to Be Successful

15 Best Entrepreneurs Books to Start Reading Now to Be Successful

Knowledge is power, and you’re going to need a lot of it if you’re going to be able to steer your business to success.

Without further ado, let’s take a look at the 15 best entrepreneurs books to get inspirations about success and grow your business.

1. Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

    This book has been dubbed the Granddaddy of All Motivational Literature, and it was actually the first book that gave a prescription of what it takes to be a winner.

    Napoleon Hill draws from the stories of millionaires like Henry Ford, Andrew Carnegie, and Thomas Edison to illustrate the principles he put forth.

    Get the book here!

    2. The Lean Startup by Eric Reis

      A lot of startups end up failing, but many of these failures are actually avoidable. The Lean Startup provides a different approach that is now being adopted all over the world and changing the way that companies are developed and products are being launched.

      In The Lean Startup, Eric Reis describes what is required for a company to penetrate the fog of uncertainty in order to discover a path to a sustainable and successful business.

      Get the book here!

      3. The E-Myth Revisited by Michael E. Gerber

        In a revised edition of the 150,000-copy bestseller, The E-Myth, Michael Gerber refutes some of the myths that surround starting your own business and shows just how commonplace assumptions can end up getting in the way of being able to run a successful business.

        Gerber succeeds in walking the reader through the steps that occur in the life of a business, from infancy, through the pains of growing as an adolescent, to the perspective of the mature entrepreneur.

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        Get the book here!

        4. Rework by Jason Fried

          Most of the business books that you get today will give you the same advice: draft a business plan, study the competition, look for investors, and all that.

          However, Rework shows you a more effective, easier and faster means of succeeding when running a business. By reading it, you’ll be able to know why some plans are harmful, why you don’t really need to get investors, and why you’re better of shutting out your competition.

          Get the book here!

          5. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

            This is one of the most successful motivational books in history, selling well over 15 million copies since it was released in 1936. The book is timeless, and it appeals to businesses, self-help startups, and general readers.

            Carnegie believes that a lot of successes come from an ability to communicate rather than having brilliant insights. In his book, he teaches how to value others and make them feel appreciated and loved.

            Get the book here!

            6. Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

              Through this amazing book, Malcolm Gladwell is able to take the reader on an intellectual journey through the world of ‘outliers’. He asks the question of what truly differentiates high-achievers.

              His answer to this question is that we tend to pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and less attention to where they are actually from.

              Get the book here!

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              7. Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki

                This is the best personal finance book ever written. It tells the story of Kiyosaki and his two fathers; his real father, and that of his best friend (his rich dad), as well as how the two men helped him shape his opinions on money and investing.

                It refutes the myth that you need to earn high to become rich, and it distinguishes between working for money and having money work for you.

                Get the book here!

                8. The Ascent of Money: The Financial History of the World by Niall Ferguson

                  Niall Ferguson, in this book, follows the money to tell the story behind the evolution of the word’s financial system, from the beginning way back in ancient Mesopotamia to the latest occurrences in what he had dubbed Planet Finance.

                  Fergusson also reveals financial history as the backstory behind our very own history, with an argument that the evolution of debt and credit is as significant as the history of technological innovation and the rise of civilization.

                  Get the book here!

                  9. Liar’s Poker by Michael Lewis

                    Michael Lewis landed a job at Salomon Brothers after getting out of the London School of Economics and Princeton within three years, he had risen to the rank of bond salesman, making millions for the firm and cashing out steadily.

                    Liar’s Poker is the amalgamation of these years — a look behind the scenes at one of the most turbulent times in American business. His book is Lewis’s account of an era where greed and gluttony were the order of the day.

                    Get the book here!

                    10. Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us by Michael H. Pink

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                      A lot of people see money as the best motivator. Michael pink says it’s a mistake.

                      In this provocative book, he asserts that the secret to high performance anywhere is the need to direct our lives, to learn and create, and to do better by our world and ourselves.

                      Get the book here!

                      11. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen

                        Outdated methods don’t work in today’s world. In this book, Allen shares some awesome methods for stress-free performance that he has shared with thousands of people all over the world.

                        His premise? That productivity is proportional to your ability to relax.

                        Get the book here!

                        12. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey

                          In this book, Stephen Covey presents a holistic approach for overcoming both professional and personal issues. With insights and anecdotes, Covey presents a way to live with integrity fairness, service and dignity.

                          Get the book here!

                          13. The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich by Tim Ferriss

                            In this book, Ferriss dishes on the tips he has learned from studying the New Rich, a subculture of people who did away with the deferred life plan and mastered time and mobility to developed luxury lifestyles for themselves.

                            If you’re looking to make your way in this revolutionary new world, this here is your compass.

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                            Get the book here!

                            14. Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh

                              The CEO of Zappos shows how a unique kind of corporate identity can help deliver a huge difference in the way results are being achieved — by creating a company that values and delivers happiness.

                              Get the book here!

                              15. Losing My Virginity: How I Survived, Had Fun, and Made a Fortune Doing Business My Way by Richard Branson

                                From Virgin Atlantic Airways, Virgin Records and V2 to Virgin Cola, Virgin Megastores and a wide array of other companies, Richard Branson is the rockstar billionaire that a lot of us want to be.

                                Branson, however, did business by following a simple philosophy:

                                “Oh, screw it, let’s do it”

                                Losing My Virginity is an unusual, borderline outrageous autobiography of one of the greatest business geniuses in the world. Branson and his friends named their business “Virgin” because that was what they were — virgins at the game.

                                Since then, he’s written his success rules, creating a global business that has no headquarters, no management structure no corporate identity as it were.

                                Get the book here!

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                                Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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