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9 Signs You Are Suffered from Burnout At Work

9 Signs You Are Suffered from Burnout At Work

Everyone works. It’s kind of like a club that we’re all a part of together. Working, in and of itself, isn’t so bad but when you start overworking, that’s when things can get bad. Have you been overworking? Here are some signs that it’s time to take a break.

1. You’re making small mistakes

Did you proofread that business report and find a small typo? Or worse, did you give that business report to your boss who spotted a small typo? When we work too much, our brains just kind of stop paying the amount of attention that they’re supposed to. The result are small errors that you make everywhere that you normally wouldn’t make. It could happen to anyone too. Did you put sour cream on that taco supreme that the customer specifically asked that you keep off? Did you make a silly mistake editing a video? Everyone gets overworked and small mistakes can happen anywhere. If they’re happening to you, it’s time to take a break.

2. You feel overwhelmed

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take a break

    Have you gone into work, sat down, looked at your to-do list, and just want to start crying? We’ve all been there. Being overwhelmed is a common sign that it’s time to take a break from the job and go find a beach with an abundance of fruity drinks. Even if it’s a relatively normal day and you still feel overwhelmed, it’s time for a vacation.

    3. You’re tired all the time

    If just walking into the building brings about the sudden and irrepressible urge to go nap in a closet somewhere, then you’ve had just about enough. When you have been working too long without a break, you start walking in every day in a haze of exhaustion. This is also a cause for things like the small mistakes we talked about earlier. A well rested worker is a happy worker and that means you need some rest.

    4. You’re irritable

    There comes a point where even the usual actions of your coworkers start to tick you off. The thought of the daily grind makes you roll your eyes in derision and you’re in a bad mood before anything even happens to you. If that sounds like you, it’s time to put in a request for those vacation hours.

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    5. You suffer from insomnia

    Between the stress of the job, being irritable, and thinking about all those mistakes, you’re likely pretty stressed out. This can lead to sleepless nights, nights of tossing and turning, and trouble falling asleep. This can lead to literally everything we’ve already discussed because a good night’s rest is essential to the every day worker. If you’re so out of sorts that you can’t even sleep it off, call up HR and see when you can go to Cancun.

    6. You can’t focus

    take a break

      Do you spend half of your shift on your phone playing the latest game fad or checking your social media? Do you look at your computer screen and the words just sort of blur? Being able to focus is essential to doing good work and if you’re having trouble focusing then you’re having trouble doing good work. It’ll reflect on your performance and people will begin to wonder if you’re cut out for that job. Do yourself a favor and take a week to yourself to recuperate.

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      7. You begin neglecting other things

      Is your significant other mad at you for being at work all the time? When was the last time you sat down to participate in your favorite hobby? When you’re overworked and need a break, everything suffers. You have to focus all of your energy on work because you’re so distracted and stressed and that means you don’t have energy or time for the other things in your life that matter. It would actually be a good vacation idea to pay some attention to those things. Just saying.

      8. You don’t have any motivation

      When you feel good, you work hard. You offer to do the harder jobs and you do them well. When it’s time for you to take a vacation, you’ll find that you’re not volunteering as much. The work you get assigned seems to take forever to do. You want to take frequent breaks and you don’t want to work. If your motivation is at an all time low, maybe it’s time you had some alone time.

      9. You don’t have ambition

      By far the worst case of being exhausted is your lack of ambition. You may not be thinking of your long term goals anymore because you’re focusing on the day-to-day grind. Your dreams to move up the company ladder or find your dream job seem like a distant memory. If your priorities have fallen out of order, you need to take a time out to go re-learn what you really want.

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      When it’s time to take a break from work, you’ll feel it all over. Physically you will feel like dirt and mentally will be just as bad or worse. Going to work every day is important but taking a break every now and then is equally important. Don’t hesitate to take some time off if it means you’ll be a better worker next week.

      Featured photo credit: I Can Has Cheeseburger via i.chzbgr.com

      More by this author

      Joseph Hindy

      A writer, editor, and YouTuber who likes to share about technology and lifestyle tips.

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      Last Updated on November 3, 2020

      How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

      How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

      When you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you may create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion. However, this type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It lacks in clarity and makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing. Instead, try looking at some mind map examples to learn how to mind map and visualize your thoughts.

      Mind maps can help you zoom out and see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected. You may see connections you were missing before and find new ways of brainstorming solutions.

      Below, you’ll find more information on mind maps and see some mind map examples to inspire you next time you need to organize information.

      What Is a Mind Map?

      A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram invented by Tony Buzan[1]. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to declutter your brain or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

      In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using a pen and paper.

      The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

      How to mind map: Mind map example

        Image Credit: English Central

        By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

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        3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

        The three steps are:

        1. Set a central topic
        2. Add branches of related ideas
        3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

        Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[2]

        Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

        Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

        Word it in a clear and concise manner. It can be a single word or even a central image.

        How to mind map: start with a central idea

          Step 2 : Add Branches of Related Ideas

          What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

            Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

            Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out nearby by connecting it with shorter lines or a line of a different color. Ensure that it remains organized.

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              You can always add images or other branches later, but that’s good for now.

              In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits.” Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

              Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

              Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

              Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

              Mind map example

                I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

                In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

                Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

                You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

                • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
                • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches.
                • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

                Branch by Branch

                Start with the central topic, and add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

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                  Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                    One your ideas have filled the branches, the mind map is complete.

                    Branch by branch mind map example

                      Level by Level

                      In this “Level by Level” strategy of mind map examples, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. Here, you add elements on level 1:

                        Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                          Do the same for the next level (level 3). You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                          Level by level mind map example

                            Free-Flow

                            Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. There are no rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                            Free flow mind map example

                              Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you to help you start problem solving.

                              The Bottom Line

                              When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map using the mind map examples above. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and organize your thoughts.

                              If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective, and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on a phone and computer.

                              More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                              Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                              Reference

                              [1] Tony Buzan Group: Home
                              [2] Verbal to Visual: A Mind Mapping Approach To Your Sketchnotes

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