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8 Things You Need To Look For In Your Next Job

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8 Things You Need To Look For In Your Next Job

Hunting for jobs is a pain in ends both front and rear; optimize the experience by figuring out what it is you want. Money is important, but time is fleeting, and both family and love are important as well. Here’s a checklist of what to look for in your next job.

1. Optimus Time

Time is your most valuable resource, and you need to optimize it as your prime objective. What you learn where and from whom is up to you, but your experiences are valuable—they define who you are. The point of your job search isn’t to find some place that’ll pay you what you think you’re worth; it’s about who will give you the most value for your time.

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2. What You’ll Learn

It’s not just what you do within a company that matters, but what the company does. A database at Google contains very different content than a database at Bank of America, so being an admin at either company teaches you different lessons. Once you leave school, work (and coworkers) is your only knowledge source. I recommend working for a company that does something you’re not familiar with so you can learn outside your comfort zone, but you have to decide for yourself what works.

3. Perform a Background Search

Your company performs a background search on you, so why don’t you perform a background search on your company? While they check out what you’re up to on social media, you can check out their media presence; is it good or bad? How are they viewed by the community at large? Glassdoor.com is a great place to read honest reviews about the company you’re about to dedicate your time to. You can get an idea of what it’s like to work there, along with comparing similar jobs and companies.

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4. Not All Paychecks Are Created Equal

Some companies have great benefits, and others don’t, so weigh your options. A $20/hr job looks better than $15/hr on the surface, but when you add in cheaper (along with more comprehensive and user-friendly) health plans, 401k matching, bonus structures, and annual raises, a lower-paying job on the surface can actually pay much more.

5. Examine the Corporate Ladder

How much you make is important, but what’s more important is the ability to grow and evolve as a person. If you can’t do this at that company, you’ll either have to stop growing or move on. Read the bios of executives to see where they came from—were the executives recruited internally or externally? If they consistently go outside the company to hire leaders, that’s usually a sign to be wary.

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6. Who Is Your Daddy, and What Does He Do?

Speaking of executives, while you’re looking them up, look up everyone whose name you know in that company. The Internet is a wealth of information. LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter—check out your potential supervisors, HR reps, and other leadership’s profiles everywhere you can. Never be afraid to stalk anyone who owes you money or does business with you.

7. Qualifications and Experience

When looking for work, pay careful attention to the job requirements. If your qualifications and experience don’t match the job posting, you won’t even make it past the automated résumé filters. You’ll certainly never convince anyone you can make it up. It sounds like a catch-22, but you need to stick to jobs that you’re actually qualified for.

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8. The Difference between a Job and a Career

A job is something you do to make money; a career is something you do that makes money. It’s important to have a clear dividing line between the two. Always work hard (even when it’s for free), but if you’re at a job, and it’s been more than three years, it’s time to take a long, hard look at what you’re doing with your life. You can’t find fulfillment in a job, so start searching for a career.

It’s nice to see Peeping Tom use his powers for something productive…

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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