Advertising
Advertising

8 Great Reasons Why You Should Work Abroad In Your 20s

8 Great Reasons Why You Should Work Abroad In Your 20s

When I was 24, I got a job offer to work in Naples, Italy. The only problem, as far as my mother was concerned, was that there was a cholera epidemic there at the time. Our local newspaper was full of morbid details about the 22 deaths. She tried to stop me going but failed. I got the vaccination and off I went. It was an adventure that was so exciting and unforgettable that I am still living in Italy and will never leave it now. So, what are the reasons why you should work abroad in your 20s if you get the chance, like I did?

1. It helps to build your character

I was facing an enormous challenge. I had to drive a long way through Europe. I was a novice as regards driving in Naples, which was hair-raising but liberating! I had to cope with a new language as I hardly knew any Italian. I had to walk into a new job and learn to get on with a variety of unforgettable characters. I cannot think of a better character-building exercise.

2. It opens up new career paths

I had always wanted to be a teacher but teaching English as a foreign language was a new challenge. I had done some initial training in London, which really helped me to get started. While in Naples, I was stimulated to study for a Diploma, which was an essential career building block. I was also lucky enough to win a scholarship to study for a Masters in Linguistics. Having worked abroad can give you the extra edge when you start applying for jobs later on.

Advertising

3. It can broaden your mind

“The World is a book, and those who do not travel, read only a page.” – Saint Augustine

There is no doubt about it. Travel widens your horizons in every sense of the word. Experimenting with new cuisine, seeing exotic locations and wonderful works of art all add to your personal development and education. I met new people who enriched me enormously.

4. It can help sort out stereotypes and perceptions

“To travel is to discover that everyone is wrong about other countries.” – Aldous Huxley

Advertising

We all grow up with certain preconceived notions about national stereotypes. These are the result of our education, religious views, racial origin, family upbringing and our gender. We expect to meet disorganized Italians, cold Scandinavians and aggressive Africans. These stereotypes can turn into prejudice, which is risky. Travel will soon dispel these notions because you may well meet the friendliest Scandinavian you can imagine. I quickly learned to question and discover more about Italians before rushing to any conclusions.

5. It encourages you to take risks

“I dislike feeling at home when I am abroad.” – George Bernard Shaw

Taking risks while you are in your 20s is much less dangerous than later on. There are also loads of opportunities now. I took a risk moving to another country, learning a new language and giving up a pensionable job in a boring, Irish town. My mother never really forgave me for giving up that pension. But the new opportunities, experiences and enrichment of my life more than made up for that. I was right in thinking that I would never get the chance again. Once you settle into relationships and a career, moving abroad becomes a gigantic task.

Advertising

6. It enables you to see all those places you dreamed about.

7.  It helps you sort out what you really want from life

Being stuck in one place in your early 20s is not going to do your creativity much good. Yes, you may be able to escape for holidays, but that is not the same as making out, organizing living quarters, finding a job, and seeking new relationships. All these exercises help you decide what you really want from life.

8. It can do wonders for your cooking

“The most sincere form of love is love for food.” – George Bernard Shaw

I loved eating out and being invited to sample Italian food. People always talk about food in Italy and it is a sign of great culture. Soon, things caught up with me as I had to start inviting people back. That was how I learned to cook. It also laid the foundations for a healthy diet and has been instrumental in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Advertising

“Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Let us know in the comments where you would like to work abroad and why. Your stereotypes are in for a rough ride!

Featured photo credit: Mount Vesuvius/Glen Scarborough via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

15 Signs Of Negative People 10 Reasons Why People Are Unmotivated (And Ways to Be Motivated) 10 Scientifically Proven Ways To Stay Happy All The Time Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

Trending in Work

1 How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor 2 10 Ways to Build Positive Work Relationships and Work as a Team 3 20 Best Places to Work for a Great Career in 2018 4 22 Team Building Activity for Work That Are Fun and Encourage Creativity 5 17 Types of Online Work at Home Jobs that Really Pay Off

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

Advertising

1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

Advertising

3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

Advertising

5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

Advertising

Read Next