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7 Ways to Let Your Family Know You’re Serious About Entrepreneurship

7 Ways to Let Your Family Know You’re Serious About Entrepreneurship

RIIIIIIIINNNNNNGGGG!!! That’s only the 9,6697th time your mom’s called today. Rather than beat your head against the wall again, take back your precious minutes. You’re the owner. You’re the boss. Entrepreneurship isn’t a game. And whether you work from home or work from Starbucks, your time is money. And every minute you allow someone to take away from it, imagine they’re sucking a dollar from your bank account. And that is the fastest way to end up eating peanut butter and jelly with a side of Ramen noodles for dinner.

They mean well. They really do. They don’t intend to steal your money. They think they’re just calling. Besides, why wouldn’t you want to talk to them? But in the end, their good intentions won’t pay your bills. And the key to laying down the law is to do it while letting them know you are serious about your work and that you appreciate their being a part of your life. So when they step over the line and ignore the following rules, all you have to do is politely, calmly, and lovingly (with a hint of smugness, of course) remind them that the rules are in place because success doesn’t happen without them and that you’re happy to deal with them when the time is right.

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Lay down your rules, take back your time, and own your business. Without getting disowned by your family. Here are the new house rules of entrepreneurship for both you and your family.

1. On or Off

Set your hours to coincide with the time they are least likely to bother you. Yes, when they’re asleep. Whether your disctractors tend to be under 4′ tall or older than 45 years of age, they have to sleep. Schedule your hours so they happen when you have the most energy. Morning person? Get up at 3:30am like I do and work like a mad person until you are forced to stop and get everyone ready for the day. Night Owl? No worries, trade your movie time in for work time. You’ll be amazed at how much you’ll accomplish with no one calling you or screaming behind your head. Really.

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2. Lock yourself away.

If you work from home, it’s likely you’ll run into more than one project that requires you to work outside of your scheduled “Office Hours.” Don’t panic. Set up the kids, your spouse, your bird in another room with LOADS of fun and entertaining activities. Soccer games are great to keep those sports lovers out of your hair and a deck of cards? Well, the kids will never play a hand of rummy with them, but they’ll have a blast playing 52 Pick Up. While they’re doing what they do best, you’ll hunker down in your corner and do what you do best. Note: There will be no yelling screaming or fighting during this time or the party is over and everyone sits on their beds quietly waiting for time to finish. Totally not kidding. And when your work time is done, put in their minds that everyone will pitch in to clean up the mess.

3. Automate

Set an automated message that lets you politely remind callers that you’re unable to be interrupted right now. They’ll get the message and you won’t have to be scum by hanging up on them. After one or two tries, they’ll give up and be more respectful of your time. All you have to do is wait.

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4. Give back

Contribute a percentage of your earnings to the household. Nothing says you mean business like money. And when your family sees your not just pocketing your earnings for new pipes for your motorcycle, they’ll understand that you’re in this for the long haul and they can enjoy it or they can give up what you’re putting forth for them. And as your business grows, so does your financial input, making your business the last thing they’ll want you to quit.

5. Hide it

Tuck your phone in a drawer or in another room on silent. Even if you’ve turned the volume all the way down and the vibration is off, it’s still a temptation sitting by your side. You’ll still work a little; then catch yourself on Facebook ten minutes later or responding to somebody’s yummy chocolate birthday on Instagram. Protect yourself from pitfalls. Keep your phone at bay in a drawer or in another room.

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6. Silence!

Turn off all notifications. This was the hardest thing for me. You’re in business, right? It’s your job to respond to situations. And you will, in time. During your peak work hours, the ones where you create the most content, have the most success reaching out to people, or just generating ideas, it’s your duty to honor and respect that time. And responding in social media or to emails isn’t doing that. Section out time to do that each day and you won’t feel you NEED to be “on” 24hrs/day.

7. Fill the shoes

Act like a BOSS. No one is going to take your business seriously if YOU don’t. You have a business to run. Run it as though every eye on you is waiting for you to fail. And you will never let that happen. Your time is now. They’ll learn to deal with it. They’ll learn to live around it. They’ll learn to love it as much as you do. Whether “they” are your spouse, your kids or your mom. Set up your rules. Set up your success.

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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