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7 Most Common Reasons Why Employees Leave A Company

7 Most Common Reasons Why Employees Leave A Company

A steady, well-trained workforce is one of the many keys to a successful business. It’s always a significant loss when company time and resources are invested in an employee who then leaves prematurely. Some employees quit due to health problems or some other unavoidable reason; however, most leave of their own accord and many of these departures can be avoided. This is especially important if isolated incidents turn into an exodus.

In many cases, it is the working environment rather than low pay that prompts an employee to leave. Fortunately, a simple analysis may explain why employees are “voting with their feet” and choosing to leave a business. By talking openly with current and former employees, recruiters, managers and business owners can discover the reasons behind unhappiness and why people choose to leave. They can then work to rectify an unhappy working environment. Here are seven of the most common reasons why employees leave a company:

1. An inflexible schedule can be very problematic for an employee.

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    Employers and supervisors sometimes forget that employees have lives outside of the workplace and fail to offer or even consider a flexible schedule. A stringent, five-day, forty-hour working week leaves little time for conducting business outside of the business. Increasing hours Monday through Thursday so employees work four ten-hour days then have a long weekend each weekend, is one way some employers are addressing this problem.

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    Another option is to hire two people to share the role. Employers gain in having a broader perspective brought to the position, and the workload can be expanded. Telecommuting is also becoming highly favored in the workplace as more people take advantage of better technology. Productivity is increased and employees may schedule their own workday and week.

    2. Management may be causing problems rather than solving them.

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        Surprisingly, sometimes an employee advanced to management is a poor manager. A manager may also have poor habits, such as being too attached to his or her email, smartphone, or computer. Inattention to employee needs can cause an employee to leave out of frustration. Managers who are too busy or too distracted to listen to employee concerns are definitely a problem that needs to be addressed.

        A manager who cannot be bothered to assist employees, or who sloughs off their responsibilities, or who blames others for departmental problems is giving off warning signs of extremely poor management. Perhaps, even, the manager is failing to challenge his or her employees, or sets goals that are unrealistic or are all talk and no action. These are also indicators of a bad manager.

        3. Opportunities to advance are not available to talented and gifted employees.

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          Upward mobility is important to every employee and career stagnation can bring those dreams to a grinding halt. There is more to working than a paycheck. Of course, pay is a big motivator, but it is not a major motivator. People like to feel that they are being challenged or that they are the “go-to” person to resolve particular problems. No one likes to feel they are replaceable or mere cogs in a larger mechanism.

          Non-existent training programs or work delegations often contribute to this problem. Performance evaluations that are specific to work development may assist in stemming an employee exodus. If an employee knows where and how improvement can be implemented, the employee will likely choose to stay over searching for a new position.

          4. Employers sometimes devalue their workers, creating a hostile work environment.

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            Employees who do not feel valued or respected in the workplace will leave. It is simply an issue that employees do not and will not endure to stay in a workplace. Disrespect in the workplace causes a significant reduction in productivity as well. As the working relationship is dissolved, expensive high employee turnover is the result.

            Part of the work ethic, discipline, and enjoyment of work is derived from being a known and valued employee. A lack of appreciative respect on the part of the employer reflects poorly to potential customers and in the market as well. In other words, new and returning customers take note of this and will begin to wonder: If employees are derided, is the customer possibly undervalued as well?

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            5. Management has failed to provide proper support to employees.

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                Employees may begin to feel taken advantage of when support is lacking in the workplace. Perhaps, in order to cut costs, the employer has a single employee working in the role of two or even three people. Or an employee spends a great amount of his or her time on tasks outside his or her job description, such as copying, stuffing envelopes, or other unrelated clerical duties.

                Another example of lack of support is requiring the employee to ‘fill-in’ for other important roles. Inexperience quickly leads to frustration as the new tasks go undone or are so demanding that the role the person was hired for goes unfulfilled. A lack of support feeds into an employee’s feelings of disrespect, further causing the employee to feel alienated and ultimately leave the company.

                6. An out-of-date policy may cause an employee to walk.

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                  A failure to address employee concerns in a timely manner leads to overwhelming frustration. Problems can and should be addressed quickly and soundly. Another frustrating aspect is that the employee may find themselves constantly addressing a problem that could easily be solved with updated policy. Policies that address the conduct of teamwork, supervisor-employee relationships, access to social media in the workplace, or the length of time it may take to resolve an issue are all examples of this. Policies that are outdated, or compliance and implementation procedures that seem to take forever, can often encourage an employee to look elsewhere for employment.

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                  7. A shift in core values can cause an employee to quit.

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                    A change in the central core values of a company often has a negative effect on an employee. The employee may find that his or her personal values are now incongruent with those of the company. An employee may find that the value change is not something he or she had signed on for when choosing to work there. Rather than compromise, very often the employee will simply leave.

                    An example of a core value shift may be witnessed at a political scale. Health plans that protect women are now federally mandated, and private organizations are finding themselves at odds with the sweeping change. Companies are choosing to ‘walk away’ from the mandate by suing and refusing to implement the new policy.

                    Have you ever found a working environment so bad you felt you had to leave? Have you ever had your complaints to management heard and successfully redressed? What do you find intolerable in the workplace? Let us know in the comments below.

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                    Published on September 17, 2018

                    17 Ways to Ace Your Next Phone Interview And Land the Job You Deserve

                    17 Ways to Ace Your Next Phone Interview And Land the Job You Deserve

                    There is one thing standing in the way of you and the job of your dreams: a phone interview. The screening interview is an opportunity for companies to narrow the list of presumably qualified applicants and determine who merits a closer look.

                    So many candidates exclude themselves from the phone interview by being unprepared or by failing to take this screening session seriously. A phone interview should not block you from living the life you have always imagined.

                    Here are 17 tips to help you ace your next one:

                    1. Clear the deck.

                    If you are reading this blog, you are likely busier than you would prefer or even imagine. Even when you schedule or accept phone interviews, they are likely sandwiched between meetings.

                    To show up fully present, energized and engaged, I recommend you clear the deck and give yourself at least an hour of uninterrupted time before and 30 minutes following the interview.

                    You can use the time to mentally prepare, develop a list of questions, rehearse answers to likely questions and ensure you are comfortable and ready for the interview.

                    2. Look the part.

                    It is no secret that we perform better when we look and feel the part. If you have a phone interview, dress up for the interview, if dressing up is comfortable and allows you to put your best foot forward.

                    Even though you will likely do the interview from home or a private location, be sure you are dressed professionally. This will allow you to be fully engaged and present.

                    In the event, the interviewer asks to connect with you via Zoom, Google Hangout or Skype, you will be prepared.

                    3. Resend your resume and cover letter prior to the call.

                    As a courtesy, resend your resume and cover letter prior to your screening interview. You never know if the person interviewing you has had a busy day or if a schedule change forced him or her to work from home rather than the office where the individual has access to their files.

                    There have been many times in my career where a last-minute change or a mix-up with support staff has left me scrambling at the last minute to find a candidate’s resume. It is quite embarrassing to misplace a resume and ask the interviewee to resubmit it.

                    You can save the interviewer the trouble and earn extra points by resending both documents in advance of your call. A simple message will suffice, such as “I am looking forward to speaking with you in an hour, and I am resending my resume to ensure it is at the top of your inbox.”

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                    4. Research the interviewer.

                    Once your interview is scheduled, be sure to research the person facilitating it.

                    You will want to Google the person and check their social media accounts. When you research the interviewer, try to get a sense of the individual’s personal and professional interests.

                    Once you identify those interests, acknowledge them in the interview, but do not dwell on them, because you do not want to make the interviewer uncomfortable. Follow his or her lead. If the interviewer indulges your questions or comments, by all means, continue the conversation.

                    I am always impressed when someone I am meeting with takes the opportunity to learn something about me ahead of time. This projects interest, which is important in my line of work.

                    5. Research the company.

                    In addition to researching the interviewer, be sure to research the company.

                    Ask people in your network if they know anyone who works or has worked for the organization in question. Conduct a Google search on the company, and be mindful to look beyond the first page of the search query.

                    If there are yelp reviews on the company, be careful to review those and look for trends as well as how recent the reviews were posted. While more recent reviews are obviously cause for pause, older reviews – depending on their nature – could be problematic as well.

                    6. Check the staff listing or “About Us” section of the company’s website.

                    Part of your research into a company is assessing whether you know staff or board members who are connected with the company.

                    Most organizations list their staff or board members in the “About Us” or “Our Team” section of the website. Prior to a phone interview, check these sections to determine whether you know someone who works for the company. If you do, reach out to that person to request a phone interview to learn more about the company.

                    7. Remember interviewing is a two-way street.

                    As much as the company representative wants to learn about you as the interviewee, you will want to learn about the organization.

                    Try to ferret out information on the company, the job for which you are applying as well as the manager to whom you would report. You will also want to ask questions to assess the interview process.

                    Additionally, because culture is important and will permit or slow your ability to do your job, ask questions to assess company culture, such as “What do your employees say they like most about working for your organization?” “What do employees say they like least?” “What do you do to create and maintain a healthy workplace culture?”

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                    8. Develop questions prior to the interview.

                    Prior to your interview, develop a list of questions about the company, the position for which you are applying, growth opportunities in the company, the ideal candidate for the position, and so forth. This will save you the trouble of thinking of questions on the spot during the interview.

                    I have found that once I become nervous, it is a lot harder to come up with questions on the spot, and interviews can be anxiety-producing without preparation.

                    9. Stand during the interview.

                    I train leaders and, incidentally, graduate students to become spokespersons.

                    I recommend that they stand during media interviews. I find that it helps the person speaking to project better, and it reduces the urge to get too comfortable in an interview setting and say something that could be too informal.

                    Similarly, I recommend interviewees stand for at least a portion of their phone interview.

                    10. Allow the interviewer to talk.

                    While it is essential you ask questions during an interview, you should not dominate the conversation.

                    Most people love talking about themselves and the company they represent, and it is your job as the interviewee to walk a fine line between allowing the interviewer to talk and interspersing questions when and where appropriate.

                    I am not suggesting you remain silent – you want the interviewer to learn about you; but you should ensure that the interviewer has ample opportunity to do what most people do best: talk about themselves and their work.

                    11. Refrain from multitasking.

                    We all live hurried lives, and most of us have to-do lists that are impossible to complete.

                    When we have multiple due dates and obligations, it is typical to want to avail oneself of every seemingly free moment of time.

                    When conducting or participating in a phone interview, be as present as possible. This means refraining from multitasking, which could mean responding to emails, text messages or social media messages. It could mean researching the company during the interview.

                    Whatever multitasking means for you, simply do not do it, especially during a screening interview.

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                    12. Conduct the phone interview in a place where there is minimal noise.

                    A common thread throughout this post has been that most of us live busy lives. So, it is natural to be on the go.

                    If you have the luxury of conducting a phone interview from home or a private office where there is minimal noise, do so. You may also rent a co-working space or ask a friend if you can borrow his or her office.

                    Whatever you do, select a place where there is minimal noise and distraction. The person interviewing you should not have to strain to hear what you are saying or compete with ambient noises.

                    When I am interviewing a candidate and competing with background noise, I grow frustrated and my focus can shift from getting to know the person to silencing the noise. Do not force your interviewer to choose.

                    13. Be punctual.

                    Do not leave the interviewer waiting. This is both rude and unprofessional, and it may count against you.

                    If you are able to follow my earlier advice and not schedule meetings within an hour of your phone interview, you should have no time being prompt for your discussion.

                    If you foresee that you will be late, be sure to give the interviewer a heads-up at least 15-20 minutes prior to the start of the call.

                    14. Focus on how you can and will help.

                    Let’s face it: people are naturally self-interested.

                    When you walk into an interview focused on what you can bring and how you can solve a hiring manager’s problems, you will set yourself and your candidacy apart.

                    Think about the challenges you could potentially solve and then share how your joining the team will benefit the company, not just you.

                    15. Take the interview seriously.

                    Do not assume you will have an opportunity to meet face to face with company representatives. Do not discount the weight that may be placed on phone interviews.

                    I once applied for a position on the East Coast while living on the West Coast. While my first interview was face to face, my interview with one senior leader was over the phone. I walked into the interview thinking it would be less intense than it was.

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                    From the moment the leader got on the phone with me, I was on my toes. I had to quickly recalibrate to handle the intensity of the questions lobbed on me.

                    To this day, more than six years later, that phone interview remains one of the most difficult interviews I have ever had. Fortunately for me, I was offered the job, but the experience still stands out as a learning lesson.

                    16. Send a thank-you note.

                    Kindness is underrated. We live in a society where most people are overscheduled and overbooked.

                    When faced with intense pressure, it can be easy to underestimate the role of kindness. But when someone shares a portion of the day with you by granting you an interview, you owe it to that individual and to yourself to send a thank-you note following the interview.

                    The note can be via email, a standard letter or a card. So few people do this that those who do stand out.

                    Become an individual who remembers this gesture of kindness and professional courtesy.

                    17. Be positive.

                    Energy really is contagious. If you don’t believe me, consider locking yourself in a room for one hour with people are upset. By the time you leave the room, you will be upset right along with them. It is natural to mirror the other person even if you do not realize you are doing it.

                    During your next phone interview, mirror positivity, both about the position, the company and most importantly, your skill sets. The interviewer will pick up on your energy and positivity and that will reflect favorably.

                    I cannot tell you how many times I have interviewed candidates who communicated no excitement or enthusiasm. Getting through the interview was difficult, not to mention, I kept thinking about what it would be like to work with the person daily.

                    Being positive not only helps you feel better, it helps the person interviewing you as well.

                    If you have read this list and want to add other tips, please tweet the link to this article and include the point you believe I missed. Use the hashtag #AceIt when you reach out.

                    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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