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6 Ways To Make You Feel Happy At Work

6 Ways To Make You Feel Happy At Work

We adults spend a large part of our time at work. This directly means that the way we feel at work usually transfers into our free time, and therefore, it intrudes on our private life. Most people tend to come to terms with their faith and simply struggle on without even making an effort to change the situation they are in. Work-related stress and emotional discomfort shouldn’t be a normal thing, and the fact that you feel bad in your workplace doesn’t always mean that the environment is bad.

People are different and situations that make some of us crumble under stress are minor problems for others. If you are dissatisfied with the way you feel while at the office, here are a few things that will help you feel happy at work.

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1. Define your comfort zone.

In order to create a environment which suits you, you first need to know what your desirable situation is. Try to visualize the situation in which you will feel comfortable while in your workplace so you can work toward achieving it. If you have a clearly defined comfort zone, your coworkers will take notice and establish a relationship that suits you. I know this sounds a bit abstract, but people often assume that work environment is what it is, but actually this is something that you need to build.

2. Push your limits and strive for more.

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Push the limit

    Don’t expect everything to go like you imagined and give a solid effort to adapt. This is especially important if you are new. Strive to adapt, ask for advice and feedback from your boss and your coworkers so you can catch on to the way things are done more quickly. This kind of active communication will also make it far easier to give your creative input. Strive to progress and think about your future within the company. Being stuck in a position you don’t really like can be bad for your motivation.

    3. Try to see things from a different perspective.

    If you find some element of social conduct or business protocol in your workplace strange, think about why it is like that. Being objective is important when evaluating a situation, and in some cases, people get carried away solely based on first impressions. Reframing techniques have shown great results in these cases, significantly lowering stress and making the adaptation period a lot shorter and much easier.

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    4. Make an effort to preserve your health.

    Each workplace and occupation has its fair share of health hazard. Some are minor, while others can be very dangerous if you disregard them. Many people assume that working at the office is quite harmless to your health but this isn’t true. Most office jobs include long periods of time spent behind a desk. Uncomfortable seating positions and months that you spend in them can cause a lot of issues including migraine, back pain and so on. It is always worth investing in your health and well-being. Being stiff and sore has a very negative impact on your mood and overall state of mind.

    5. Make your space your own.

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    Customize your office space

      Most office workplaces encourage this action. Personalizing your work space is something that will help you feel like you own it, and therefore, you will feel more comfortable when you are at work. The same goes for the organization of your tools, office supplies, documents and so on. Make an arrangement that you find logical. This way, you will know that everything you are looking for is right where you put it. This level of familiarity with your work station will help you be more efficient and feel more at ease.

      6. Turn coworkers into friends.

      It sounds a bit strange when you put it like that, but is quite unlikely that you are in a situation in which nobody at work is “friend material.” The main thing about finding friends is giving people a chance. Annoying habits and annoying aspects of a personality are things that most of us have, but this doesn’t make us bad people. It takes time to get to know someone, so make sure you don’t write everyone off before you get a chance to see what kind of people they are.

      I hope these help, but be aware that everyone’s situation is different, and you might not need to focus on some of the things mentioned here. The important thing is to always remember that your job is a large part of your life, which means that it has a considerable influence on life outside of work, so making an effort to improve it is energy well spent.

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      Ivan Dimitrijevic

      Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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      Last Updated on July 22, 2019

      10 Killer Cover Letter Tips to Nail Every Interview Opportunity

      10 Killer Cover Letter Tips to Nail Every Interview Opportunity

      A cover letter is an introduction to what will be found in the resume. In a cover letter, the applicant is able to use a conversational tone, to explain why the attached resume is worth reviewing, why the applicant is qualified, and to express that it’s the best application the reader will see for the open position.

      Employers do read your cover letter, so consider the cover letter an elevator pitch. The cover letter is the overview of your professional experience. The information in the body presents the key qualifications, the things that matter. The cover letter is the “here is what will be found in my presentation”, which is the resume in this case.

      Something really important to point out- a cover letter should be written from scratch each time. Great cover letters are the ones that express why the applicant is the best for the specific job being applied to. Using a general cover letter will not lead to great results.

      This doesn’t mean that your cover letter should repeat your most valuable qualifications, it just means that you don’t want to recycle a templated, general letter, not specific to the position being applied to.

      Here’re 10 cover letter tips to nail every interview.

      1. Take a few minutes to learn about the company so that you use an appropriate tone

      Like people, every company has its own culture and tone. Doing a bit of research to learn what that is will be extremely beneficial. For instance, a technology start-up has a different culture and tone than a law firm. Using the same tone for both would be a mistake.

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      2. Don’t use generic cover letter terms — be specific to each company and position

      Hiring managers and recruiters can easily identify generic cover letters. They read cover letters and resumes almost every day. Using words and terms like: “your company” instead of naming the actual company, and “your website” instead of “in your about us section on www.abc123.com”, are mistakes. Be as specific as possible, it’s worth the additional few minutes.

      3. Address the reader directly if you can

      It is an outdated practice to use “To Whom it May Concern” if you know the person that will be reviewing your documents. You may wonder how you’ll know this information; this is where attention to detail and/or a bit of research comes into play.

      For example, if you are applying for a job using LinkedIn, many times, the job poster is listed within the job post. This is the person reading your documents when you “apply now”. Addressing that person directly will be much more effective than using a generic term.

      4. Don’t repeat the information found in the resume

      A resume is an action-based document. When presenting information in a resume, the tone isn’t conversational but leading with action instead, for example: “Analyze sales levels and trends, and initiate action as necessary to ensure attainment of sales objectives”.

      In a cover letter, you have the opportunity to deliver your elevator pitch: “I have positively impacted business development and growth initiatives, having combined two regions into one and achieving 17% in compound growth over the following three-year period”.

      Never use your resume qualifications summary as a paragraph in your resume. This would be repeating information. Keep in mind that your cover letter is the introduction to your resume- the elevator pitch- this is your opportunity to show more personality.

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      5. Tell the company what you can do for them

      As mentioned above, this is your chance to explain to the company why you are the best person for the open position. This is where you tell the company what you can do for them: “If hired as the next (job title) with (company name), I will cultivate important partnerships that will enhance operations while boosting revenue.”

      Many times, we want to take the reader through the journey of our life. It is important to remember that the reader needs to know why you are the best person for the job. Lead with that.

      6. Showcase the skills and qualifications specific to the position

      A lot of people are Jack’s and Jill’s of all trades. This can be a great big picture, but not great to showcase in a cover letter or resume.

      Going back to what was mentioned before, cover letters and resumes are scanned through ATS. Being as specific as possible to the position being applied to is important.

      If you are applying for a coding position, it may not be important to mention your job in high school as a dog walker. Sticking to the exact job being applied to is the most effective way to write your cover letter.

      7. Numbers are important — show proof

      It always helps to show proof when stating facts: “I have a reputation for delivering top-level performance and supporting growth so that businesses can thrive; established industry relationships that generated double digit increase in branch revenues”.

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      8. Use testimonials and letters of recommendations

      A cover letter is a great place to add testimonials and information from your letter of recommendations. Mirroring the example above, here is a good way to use that information:

      I have a history of consistently meeting and exceeding metrics: “(Name) rose through the company and became a Subject Matter Expert, steadily providing exceptional quality of work.”- Team Manager.

      9. Find the balance between highlighting your achievements and bragging

      There is fine line between telling someone about your achievements and bragging. My advice is to always use facts first, and support that with an achievement related to the fact, as shown in the examples above.

      You don’t want to have a cover letter with nothing but bullet points of what you have achieved. I can’t stress this enough — cover letters are your elevator pitch, the introduction to your resume.

      10. Check your length — you want to provide no more than an introduction

      The general rule for most positions is one page in length. Positions such as professors and doctors will require more in length (and they actually use CV’s); however, for most positions, one page is sufficient. Remember, the cover letter is an introduction and elevator pitch. Follow the logic below to get you started:

      Start with: “I am ready to deliver impeccable results as (name of company) next (Position Title).

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      What you know and like about the company, what initiatives, missions, goals resonate with you: “I read/listened to an interview that your Chief of Staff did on www.abc123.com. His/her statement regarding important up and coming employee engagement initiatives really resonated with me”.

      Overview of your qualifications and experience: “I have a strong background in developing, monitoring, and controlling annual processes and operational plans related to community relations and social initiatives”.

      Highlight/ Back up your facts with achievements: “I’m a vision-driven leader, with a proven history of innovation and mentorship; I led an initiative that reduced homelessness in four counties and received recognition from the local Homeless Network and the County Commissioner”.

      Close with what will you do for the company: “As your next (job title), I am focused on hitting the ground running as a transformational leader who is driven by challenge, undeterred by obstacles, and committed to the growth of (name of company).

      Bonus Advice

      When applying for a job online or in person, a resume and a cover letter are standard submissions. At least 98% of the time, both your resume and cover letter and scanned via ATS (applicant tracking systems). You can learn more about that process here.

      The information provided in a cover letter should be written and organized to be compatible with these scans, so that it can make to a human; from there, you want to make sure that you capture the recruiter and/or hiring managers attention.

      More About Nailing Your Dream Job

      Featured photo credit: Kaleidico via unsplash.com

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