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6 Ways To Make You Feel Happy At Work

6 Ways To Make You Feel Happy At Work

We adults spend a large part of our time at work. This directly means that the way we feel at work usually transfers into our free time, and therefore, it intrudes on our private life. Most people tend to come to terms with their faith and simply struggle on without even making an effort to change the situation they are in. Work-related stress and emotional discomfort shouldn’t be a normal thing, and the fact that you feel bad in your workplace doesn’t always mean that the environment is bad.

People are different and situations that make some of us crumble under stress are minor problems for others. If you are dissatisfied with the way you feel while at the office, here are a few things that will help you feel happy at work.

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1. Define your comfort zone.

In order to create a environment which suits you, you first need to know what your desirable situation is. Try to visualize the situation in which you will feel comfortable while in your workplace so you can work toward achieving it. If you have a clearly defined comfort zone, your coworkers will take notice and establish a relationship that suits you. I know this sounds a bit abstract, but people often assume that work environment is what it is, but actually this is something that you need to build.

2. Push your limits and strive for more.

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Push the limit

    Don’t expect everything to go like you imagined and give a solid effort to adapt. This is especially important if you are new. Strive to adapt, ask for advice and feedback from your boss and your coworkers so you can catch on to the way things are done more quickly. This kind of active communication will also make it far easier to give your creative input. Strive to progress and think about your future within the company. Being stuck in a position you don’t really like can be bad for your motivation.

    3. Try to see things from a different perspective.

    If you find some element of social conduct or business protocol in your workplace strange, think about why it is like that. Being objective is important when evaluating a situation, and in some cases, people get carried away solely based on first impressions. Reframing techniques have shown great results in these cases, significantly lowering stress and making the adaptation period a lot shorter and much easier.

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    4. Make an effort to preserve your health.

    Each workplace and occupation has its fair share of health hazard. Some are minor, while others can be very dangerous if you disregard them. Many people assume that working at the office is quite harmless to your health but this isn’t true. Most office jobs include long periods of time spent behind a desk. Uncomfortable seating positions and months that you spend in them can cause a lot of issues including migraine, back pain and so on. It is always worth investing in your health and well-being. Being stiff and sore has a very negative impact on your mood and overall state of mind.

    5. Make your space your own.

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    Customize your office space

      Most office workplaces encourage this action. Personalizing your work space is something that will help you feel like you own it, and therefore, you will feel more comfortable when you are at work. The same goes for the organization of your tools, office supplies, documents and so on. Make an arrangement that you find logical. This way, you will know that everything you are looking for is right where you put it. This level of familiarity with your work station will help you be more efficient and feel more at ease.

      6. Turn coworkers into friends.

      It sounds a bit strange when you put it like that, but is quite unlikely that you are in a situation in which nobody at work is “friend material.” The main thing about finding friends is giving people a chance. Annoying habits and annoying aspects of a personality are things that most of us have, but this doesn’t make us bad people. It takes time to get to know someone, so make sure you don’t write everyone off before you get a chance to see what kind of people they are.

      I hope these help, but be aware that everyone’s situation is different, and you might not need to focus on some of the things mentioned here. The important thing is to always remember that your job is a large part of your life, which means that it has a considerable influence on life outside of work, so making an effort to improve it is energy well spent.

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      Ivan Dimitrijevic

      Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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      Last Updated on March 30, 2020

      How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

      How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

      Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

      • Intro to Visual Facilitation
        • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
      • Structure
        • Why, What, How to, What If
      • Do It Myself?
        • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
      • Specialize Offering?
        • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

      This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

      You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

      To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

      What Is a Mind Map?

      A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

      In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

      The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

        Image Credit: English Central

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        By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

        3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

        The three steps are:

        1. Set a central topic
        2. Add branches of related ideas
        3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

        Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

        Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

        Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

        Word it in a clear and concise manner.

          What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

            Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

            Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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              You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

              In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

              Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

              Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

              Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

                I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

                In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

                Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

                You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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                • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
                • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
                • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

                Branch by Branch

                Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

                  Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                    A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                      Level by Level

                      In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                        Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                          Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                            Free-Flow

                            Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                              I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                              What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                              Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                              The Bottom Line

                              When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                              If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                              More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                              Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                              Reference

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