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5 Cut n’ Paste Scripts for Dealing with Awkward Business Situations

5 Cut n’ Paste Scripts for Dealing with Awkward Business Situations

Have you ever found yourself wondering what to do when a client disappears mid-project or stops paying your invoices?

Self-employment can be fulfilling and lots of fun for sure, but it’s also a bit of a minefield, especially when you’re starting out.

Here are five scripts to help you navigate your way through some common awkward business situations without losing friends, money or your sanity.

1. A potential client you want to work with goes dark on you

Do you:

a)    Email to say you’re just following up and could they please let you know a.s.a.p.

b)    Email to say you’re following up on your previous follow up.

c)     Say you’re all booked up and they missed out. Too bad.

Or d) Email them and say:

Hi {potential client}

I understand you probably haven’t gotten around to thinking about our phone conversation just yet. But I wanted to check in and see if maybe you’re leaning towards a yay or a nay? No pressure either way.

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I would love to work with you and I’m really hoping we can tee up our calendars to make this happen. I believe that together, we can rock this event/launch/project. But if it doesn’t happen, I’m behind you one hundred per cent and wish you all the best.

Respectfully yours,

2. A friend, acquaintance or client has added you to their email list without your consent.

Do you:

a) Unsubscribe immediately. How dare they?

b) File them as junk. They deserve it.

c) Stay subscribed–you don’t want to offend them.

Or d) Unsubscribe (your time and your inbox is sacred), but also send them a nice note along these lines:

Hi there,

Thank you for sending me your newsletter. I loved what you wrote about {insert topic}. Unfortunately I did have to unsubscribe due to the pressure my inbox is under these days. You can rest assured it’s not a reflection of the amazing work you’re doing.

I look forward to catching with what you’re up to on {your blog/Twitter/Facebook}.

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Your friend,

3. A long-standing client is not paying your invoices on time.

Do you:

a) Threaten them with legal action. The nerve.

b) Keep following up with them. Surely they will crack and pay eventually.

c) Let them pay you on their schedule. You’re grateful for the work.

Or d) Email them and say:

Dear client,

You know I LOVE working with you guys and I want our relationship to continue.

However we do need to have a chat about our invoice situation. My contract stipulates payment within 30 days, and as you may or may not be aware, the last couple of payments took more than 90.

I know you have priorities when it comes to your cash flow and as a small business owner I can totally sympathize. But I also have a mortgage to pay and several humans to feed. And my bank manager won’t listen to my 90 day invoice story (believe me I’ve tried!).

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Do call me if we need to chat about this.

I remain your friend and colleague,

4. You have a hot lead, but he balks at paying your fee at the last minute. You really want to work with him.

Do you:

a) Offer them a one-time only discount.

b) Say your fees are negotiable.

c) Tell them your fees are set in stone and they can get over it if they don’t like ‘em.

Or d) Suggest a compromise

Dear {potential client},

You know I’d love to come on board and help with this project. I have so many great ideas and I’m chomping at the bit to get started. I understand where you’re coming from about my fees. We all have budgets. But I work hard to make sure my clients get the results they want, which is why my fees are set at that level.

So how about we reconfigure the schedule of work until we get closer to your budget? Perhaps there is some way, for example, you could have {name task} taken care of in-house?

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I’ll wait to hear from you.

Best,

5. You’ve signed up a new client. But they’ve started making unreasonable demands on your time. They’ve already phoned you five times and it’s Saturday, for heaven’s sake.

Do you:

a) Tell them to go jump in a lake and stop bothering you.

b) Ignore the calls. They can call on Monday if they really want to talk to you.

c) Agree to everything they want. The customer is always right.

Or d) appeal to their higher sensibilities and say:

I know you’re really enthusiastic about this project (me too by the way). But Saturday is the only day I get to spend with my family. So we’re going to have to pick this up again on Monday.

I know that as a family man/woman yourself, you’ll understand. Besides, my wife/husband/significant other will kill me if I don’t stop working weekends all the time!

Let me know in the comments if these templates work for you!

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Last Updated on December 1, 2020

How to Find Your Entrepreneurial Passion and Purpose

How to Find Your Entrepreneurial Passion and Purpose

I wrote a few articles about starting a business based on something you love doing and are passionate about. I received several responses from people saying they weren’t sure how to go about figuring out what they were most passionate about or how to find their true purpose. So I’m dedicating this article to these issues — how to find your entrepreneurial passion and purpose.

When I work with a new client, the first thing we talk about is lifestyle design. I ask each client, “What do you want your life to look like?” If you designed a business without answering this question, you could create a nice, profitable business that is completely incompatible with your goals in life. You’d be making money, but you’d probably be miserable.

When you’re looking for your life purpose, lifestyle design isn’t a crucial component. However, since we’re talking about entrepreneurial purpose, lifestyle design is indeed crucial to building a business that you’ll enjoy and truly be passionate about.

For example, say you want to spend more time at home with your family. Would you be happy with a business that kept you in an office or out of town much of the time? On the flip side, if you wanted to travel and see the world, how well could you accomplish that goal if your business required your presence, day in and day out, to survive? So start by getting some clarity on your personal goals and spend some time working on designing your life.

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At this point, you may need a little prodding, and you may want to hire a coach or mentor to work with you through this process. Many people are very used to the idea that there is a particular way a life “should” be. There are certain milestones most people tend to live by, and if you don’t meet those markers when or in the manner you’re “supposed” to meet them, that can cause some anxiety.

Here’s how to find your passion and purpose:

Give Yourself Permission to Dream a Little

Remember that this is your life and you can live it however you choose. Call it meditation or fantasy, but let your imagination run here. And answer this question:

“If you had no fears or financial limitations, what would your ideal life, one in which you could be totally content and happy, look like?”

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Once you’ve figured out your lifestyle design, it’s time to do a little more soul-searching to figure out what you’re truly passionate about. This is a time to really look within and look back.

Specifically, look back over your life history. When were you the happiest? What did you enjoy doing the most? Remember that what you’re looking for doesn’t necessarily have to be an entire job, but can actually be aspects of your past jobs or hobbies that you’ve really enjoyed.

Think About a Larger Life Purpose

Many successful entrepreneurs have earned their place in history by setting out to make a difference in the world. Is there a specific issue or cause that is important to you or that you’re particularly passionate about?

For some, this process of discovery may come easily. You may go through these questions and thought experiments and find the answers quickly. For others, it may be more difficult. In some cases, you may suffer from a generalized lack of passion and purpose in your life.

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Sometimes, this can come from having suppressed passion in your life for too long. Sometimes, it can come from eating poorly and lack of exercise. But occasionally, it may have something to do with your internal chemistry or programming. If the latter applies to you, it may be useful for you to seek help in the form of a coach, mentor, or counselor.

In other cases, not knowing your true purpose may be a matter of having not discovered it yet: you may not have found anything that makes your heart beat faster. If this is the case, now is the time to explore!

The Internet is a fantastic tool for learning and exploration. Search hobbies and careers and learn as much as you can about any topic that triggers your interest, then follow up at the library on the things that really intrigue you. Again, remember that this is your life and only you can give yourself permission to explore all that the world has available to you.

How Do You Know When You’ve Found Your True Entrepreneurial Purpose?

I can only tell you how I knew when I had discovered my own — it didn’t hit me like a ton of bricks. Rather, it settled over me, bringing a deep sense of peace and commitment. It felt like I had arrived home and knew exactly what to do and how to proceed.

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Everything flowed easily from that point forward. That’s not to say that I found success immediately after that moment. But rather, the path ahead of me was clear, so I knew what to do.

Decisions were easier and came faster to me. And success has come on MY terms, according to my own definitions of what success means to me in my own lifestyle design.

Dig deep, look within, and seek whatever help you need. Once you find that purpose and passion, your life — not just your entrepreneurial life, but your entire life — will never be the same.

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Featured photo credit: Garrhet Sampson via unsplash.com

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