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5 Cut n’ Paste Scripts for Dealing with Awkward Business Situations

5 Cut n’ Paste Scripts for Dealing with Awkward Business Situations

Have you ever found yourself wondering what to do when a client disappears mid-project or stops paying your invoices?

Self-employment can be fulfilling and lots of fun for sure, but it’s also a bit of a minefield, especially when you’re starting out.

Here are five scripts to help you navigate your way through some common awkward business situations without losing friends, money or your sanity.

1. A potential client you want to work with goes dark on you

Do you:

a)    Email to say you’re just following up and could they please let you know a.s.a.p.

b)    Email to say you’re following up on your previous follow up.

c)     Say you’re all booked up and they missed out. Too bad.

Or d) Email them and say:

Hi {potential client}

I understand you probably haven’t gotten around to thinking about our phone conversation just yet. But I wanted to check in and see if maybe you’re leaning towards a yay or a nay? No pressure either way.

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I would love to work with you and I’m really hoping we can tee up our calendars to make this happen. I believe that together, we can rock this event/launch/project. But if it doesn’t happen, I’m behind you one hundred per cent and wish you all the best.

Respectfully yours,

2. A friend, acquaintance or client has added you to their email list without your consent.

Do you:

a) Unsubscribe immediately. How dare they?

b) File them as junk. They deserve it.

c) Stay subscribed–you don’t want to offend them.

Or d) Unsubscribe (your time and your inbox is sacred), but also send them a nice note along these lines:

Hi there,

Thank you for sending me your newsletter. I loved what you wrote about {insert topic}. Unfortunately I did have to unsubscribe due to the pressure my inbox is under these days. You can rest assured it’s not a reflection of the amazing work you’re doing.

I look forward to catching with what you’re up to on {your blog/Twitter/Facebook}.

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Your friend,

3. A long-standing client is not paying your invoices on time.

Do you:

a) Threaten them with legal action. The nerve.

b) Keep following up with them. Surely they will crack and pay eventually.

c) Let them pay you on their schedule. You’re grateful for the work.

Or d) Email them and say:

Dear client,

You know I LOVE working with you guys and I want our relationship to continue.

However we do need to have a chat about our invoice situation. My contract stipulates payment within 30 days, and as you may or may not be aware, the last couple of payments took more than 90.

I know you have priorities when it comes to your cash flow and as a small business owner I can totally sympathize. But I also have a mortgage to pay and several humans to feed. And my bank manager won’t listen to my 90 day invoice story (believe me I’ve tried!).

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Do call me if we need to chat about this.

I remain your friend and colleague,

4. You have a hot lead, but he balks at paying your fee at the last minute. You really want to work with him.

Do you:

a) Offer them a one-time only discount.

b) Say your fees are negotiable.

c) Tell them your fees are set in stone and they can get over it if they don’t like ‘em.

Or d) Suggest a compromise

Dear {potential client},

You know I’d love to come on board and help with this project. I have so many great ideas and I’m chomping at the bit to get started. I understand where you’re coming from about my fees. We all have budgets. But I work hard to make sure my clients get the results they want, which is why my fees are set at that level.

So how about we reconfigure the schedule of work until we get closer to your budget? Perhaps there is some way, for example, you could have {name task} taken care of in-house?

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I’ll wait to hear from you.

Best,

5. You’ve signed up a new client. But they’ve started making unreasonable demands on your time. They’ve already phoned you five times and it’s Saturday, for heaven’s sake.

Do you:

a) Tell them to go jump in a lake and stop bothering you.

b) Ignore the calls. They can call on Monday if they really want to talk to you.

c) Agree to everything they want. The customer is always right.

Or d) appeal to their higher sensibilities and say:

I know you’re really enthusiastic about this project (me too by the way). But Saturday is the only day I get to spend with my family. So we’re going to have to pick this up again on Monday.

I know that as a family man/woman yourself, you’ll understand. Besides, my wife/husband/significant other will kill me if I don’t stop working weekends all the time!

Let me know in the comments if these templates work for you!

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Last Updated on July 10, 2019

10 Great Skills to Include in Your Resume When You Change Careers

10 Great Skills to Include in Your Resume When You Change Careers

So you want to land a new job in a new field? That’s great. But before you start sending out applications left and right, you might want to make sure you have a solid resume first. Your resume will most likely be the first thing a potential employer looks at when evaluating you as a job candidate, and if you want to make a good first impression, having a knock-out resume is key.

Considering how competitive the workforce is now, it’s even more important that you create your best resume. Here are ten skills to include in your resume when you switch careers:

1. Computer/ Tech Skills

As technology continues to evolve, it’s essential that you stay up-to-date with the latest emerging trends. You should have a basic knowledge of social networking sites, computer programs such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Excel and depending on the job you’re applying for, programs such as Adobe FrameMaker, Photoshop or Madcap Flare.

Take a look at this artice on How to Improve Your Computer Skills to Get Ahead in Your Career

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And research the required computing skills for the profession that interests you, and then if you aren’t already proficient in them, consider taking online courses via a these sites to learn them.

2. Adaptability

Employers value people who can adapt and go with the flow when they need to. In an environment where things are constantly changing, being flexible can be a tremendous asset. If you’re a flexible person, make it clear through your resume, and if you’re selected for an interview, be prepared to give an example of a time when you showed flexibility.

3. Organization

Nobody wants to hire someone who’s scatterbrained and totally lacking in organizational skills. People who are organized are able to work efficiently because they aren’t constantly searching for important documents they’ve misplaced.

Also, being organized signals to your employer that you can manage your workspace well. If you’ve got a knack for being organized, let it be known through your resume.

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4. Communication

Being able to communicate well with others is definitely a desirable trait in an employee. That means responding promptly to emails, voicing concerns right when they pop up and keeping supervisors and team members in the loop about important information they need to know.

Good communication skills deserve a place on your resume for sure and will go a long way towards making you an attractive job candidate.

5. Leadership

If you know how to step up and be a leader, you have a skill that will wow any employer out there.

Think of a time at your current or previous position when you’ve spearheaded a project, organized an event or rallied everyone together for a certain cause. Any leadership experience or skill that you have needs to be highlighted on your resume.

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6. Work Ethic

Working hard and consistently going above and beyond makes you extremely appealing to employers. It’s impressive when an employee takes initiative and does what needs to be done without having to be asked.

If you are a driven, hard worker who routinely goes the extra mile, make it known on your resume.

7. Dependability

When employers have a task that needs to be done, they need to know that the person they ask is going to follow through and do it. Being a dependable person makes you valuable in the eyes of an employer because they want to hire someone who they can trust to do what they say.

If you’re dependable, be sure to list it as a skill on your resume.

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8. Multi-Tasking Abilities

If you’ve ever taken on two different roles at once or juggled working on two different projects, mention on your resume that you’re an exceptional multi-tasker. Many jobs demand that employees can juggle multiple roles at once, so if you excel at doing so, you’ll have an edge over other candidates who aren’t so good at multi-tasking.

9. Analytical/ Problem- Solving Skills

Are you a pro at analyzing situations and assessing things from all angles? Can you analyze trends affecting performance and solve problems and glitches when they surface? If you have the ability to analyze and solve problems, then you have a skill that’s in high demand.

You can save employers valuable time and money because with you on their team, they won’t have to stall and wait too long for a problem to be solved, and they also won’t have to pay to get someone else involved to fix it. This skill absolutely deserves a place on your resume.

10. Interpersonal “People Skills”

Employers want to hire someone who will be able to get along with all different kinds of people. If you work well with others and know how to make them feel appreciated and valued, especially if you can motivate them and get them to come together and cooperate for the common good, then you have excellent interpersonal “people skills” that make you a great candidate for the job.

In a world where the competition is cutthroat for landing the job you want, you have to do what you can to set yourself apart from the competition. Step up your game by listing the skills you have that employers are looking for on your resume. If you play your cards right, with a little luck, a job offer can be yours!

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Featured photo credit: J. Kelly Brito via unsplash.com

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