Advertising
Advertising

21 Inspiring Books That Will Make You Want to Quit Your Job

21 Inspiring Books That Will Make You Want to Quit Your Job

Every once in awhile, a book comes along that makes you want to take action.

It challenges your ideas, fires you up, and gives you a lot to think about.

Books can be life-changers. These books changed the way that I look at work and my career. They ultimately led to me quitting my job to do something more meaningful and to pursue a career that I love.

These books will make you want to quit your job and go it alone, find your purpose, and live your dream.

1. The Art of Work by Jeff Goins

artofworkbook

    Jeff Goins is a writer who is following his purpose and teaching others to do the same. His new book The Art of Work encourages people to listen to their lives, find their purpose, and pursue meaning. With examples of how others have done this and practical advice to find your purpose, you’ll be inspired into taking action.

    2. Do-Over by Jon Acuff

    do over

      It doesn’t matter how old or young you are, it’s never too late for a Do Over, according to the author, Jon Acuff. All great careers have four elements in common, and Acuff reassures you that not only have you experienced those four elements, but you’re well on your way to reinventing your work and doing work you love.

      3. Crush It by Gary Vaynerchuck

      crushit

        Crush It! by Gary Vaynerchuk is infectious. The author’s energy oozes out of the pages and it was difficult for me not to close the book and take action in the middle of a paragraph while I was reading it. Luckily, Vaynerchuk’s examples and practical advice is captivating and keep your eyes on the page.

        Advertising

        4. The Four Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss

        4hww

          There’s a reason why The Four Hour Work Week remained on the New York Times Best Seller list for so long. This is a powerful book that has changed lives all over the world, giving readers hope that they don’t have to be stuck in an boring 9–5 job anymore, taking a two weeks of vacation each year and leading unfulfilling lives.

          5. The $100 Startup by Chris Guillebeau

          $100startup

            If you’ve ever thought that you had to have a lengthy business plan or investors to start a business and make money from your passions, The $100 Startup will prove you wrong. With dozens of examples of people who started successful businesses from their own homes, doing what they love for around $100, Guillebeau gives you a roadmap to do the same.

            6. The Millionaire Fastlane: Crack the Code to Wealth and Live Rich for a Lifetime by MJ DeMarco

            millionaire

              It used to be that the path to wealth was to work for 45 years in a corporate job, save diligently, and wait until you’re retired to live a good life. DeMarco challenges this mindset and gives you the tools you need to create real wealth. And part of that? Ditching the 9–5.

              7. Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel by Rolf Potts

              vagabonding

                If you’re like most people, your 9–5 job doesn’t allow you to take off and see the world. You’re lucky if you can get four weeks off each year, let alone enough time to really enjoy long-term travel or go on your dream trip.

                In Vagabonding, Potts encourages you to take a long period of time off, escape from the daily grind and soak in the benefits of long-term travel.

                8. Choose Yourself by James Altucher

                choose yourself

                  Written on the premise that job security is no longer, and we can’t count on being “chosen” by somebody else, Altucher encourages readers to “choose yourself.” Using case studies, Altucher gives you the tools to become healthy, happy, fulfilled and wealthy by taking a chance on yourself instead of waiting to be chosen by somebody else.

                  9. Problogger: Secrets for Blogging Your Way to a Six-Figure Income by Darren Rowse and Chris Garrett

                  Advertising

                  problogger

                    Writing used to be a field for starving artists and the lucky few who got noticed. Now, it’s a lucrative field for anybody with a knack for sharing information and building an audience.

                    Social media has opened up our career options immensely, including the possibility of becoming a professional blogger.

                    This book will make you want to quit your job, start a blog, and connect with the world.

                    10. The 7 Day Startup: You Don’t Learn Until You Launch by Dan Norris

                    7daystartup

                      After reading this book, I wanted to hand in my resignation so I could immerse myself in building a product and launching it using the formula in The 7 Day Startup. Norris debunks the myth that you must spend time and money validating your ideas and helps you take action.

                      11. Launch: An Internet Millionaire’s Secret Formula To Sell Almost Anything Online, Build A Business You Love, And Live The Life Of Your Dreams by Jeff Walker

                      launch

                        If you’ve ever been skeptical of making money online and the claims of people getting rich on the Internet, this book will clear your skepticism. Not only is it possible, but people are doing what they love and getting paid for it online all over the world.

                        12. Escape from Cubicle Nation: From Corporate Prisoner to Thriving Entrepreneur by Pamela Slim

                        Escape from

                          If you’ve ever wondered whether entrepreneurship is for you but are just not happy in your cubicle job, this book is for you. You don’t have to stay in a job you hate, and Slim shows you how to get out.

                          13. The Start-up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career by Reid Hoffman

                          startup of you

                            In The Start-Up of You, Hoffman and Casnocha claim that all humans were born entrepreneurs. And the world is changing. No longer can we rely on our degrees and educations to give us unlimited opportunity and job security. The Start-Up of You helps readers take their skills and abilities and leverage them into a successful entrepreneurial career.

                            Advertising

                            14. Go It Alone!: The Secret to Building a Successful Business on Your Own by Bruce Judson

                            41oJ5G4AdAL

                              Tragically, over 70% of American workers are unhappy with their work. In Go It Alone!, Judson breaks the misconceptions that starting a business is difficult and costly, and demonstrates how new media makes it easier than ever before to strike out on your own and lead a fulfilling career.

                              15. The Suitcase Entrepreneur: Create Freedom in Business and Adventure in Life by Natalie Sisson

                              suitcase

                                If you’ve ever wondered whether there are careers out there that provide the ultimate flexibility to travel where and when you want, The Suitcase Entrepreneur has your answer, and it’s “YES!”.

                                Not only can you do what you love, you can also lead a location independent career by building a lifestyle business. Sisson shows you how.

                                16. The Crossroads of Should and Must: Find and Follow Your Passion by Elle Luna

                                crossroads

                                  According to Luna, “should” is what we think we have to be doing. “Must” is our true calling—what we want to do, to fulfill our purpose. This highly inspiring book shows readers that they can choose. Nobody can choose for you.

                                  17. The Economy of You: Discover Your Inner Entrepreneur and Recession-Proof Your Life by Kimberly Palmer

                                  economy

                                    Gone are the days when people would have one main career path. When you’d go into the office from 9–5 Monday to Friday and call that a career. Now, there are millions who have side-gigs, which they use to supplement their income and recession-proof their careers. When you see what’s possible in the realm of side-businesses, you’ll realize what’s possible for your career as a whole.

                                    18. The Work Revolution: Freedom and Excellence for All by Julie Clow

                                    Advertising

                                    work revolution

                                      The Work Revolution “changes the way the world thinks about work.” With only 30% of the workforce being engaged in their work, something needs to change. And The Work Revolution is a catalyst for massive change in our workplaces.

                                      19. Quitter by Jon Acuff

                                      quitter

                                        If you’ve ever wanted to do meaningful work but wanted to find a way to do so without taking drastic measures to blow up your life and challenge your financial security, Quitter will help you “close the gap between your day job and your dream job.” Acuff shows readers how to take control of their work without going broke.

                                        20. No More Mondays: Fire Yourself—and Other Revolutionary Ways to Discover Your True Calling at Work by Dan Miller

                                        no more mondays

                                          Most of us have dreaded Mondays. And that’s unfortunate. If you stick to your terrible day job because of job security, Miller may be able to change your mind. This book demonstrates that the only way to achieve real job security is by doing what you love and following your passions.

                                          21. Let Go by Pat Flynn

                                          Let go

                                            Pat Flynn is an online entrepreneur who makes passive income to support his family, allowing him to spend all the time with his children that he wants. This wasn’t always the case, though. Flynn was let go from his job at an architecture firm and in Let Go, he writes about his path to becoming a self-employed online authority.

                                            If you’re in a job you don’t love, or you just know you’re not passionate about your work, these books will challenge your perspective, and push you out of that job-security comfort zone into the arms of your passions. 

                                            More by this author

                                            10 Everyday Things Successful Entrepreneurs Say ‘No’ To That Skyrocket Success Quit your job 21 Inspiring Books That Will Make You Want to Quit Your Job

                                            Trending in Work

                                            1 7 Strategies to Keep Employee Motivation High 2 How to Become Smarter: 21 Things You Can Do Daily 3 7 Powerful Steps to Achieve Career Success 4 The Savvy Employees Guide to Asking for a Raise 5 How to Master the Art of Stress Free Work

                                            Read Next

                                            Advertising
                                            Advertising
                                            Advertising

                                            Last Updated on December 10, 2019

                                            7 Strategies to Keep Employee Motivation High

                                            7 Strategies to Keep Employee Motivation High

                                            Highly motivated employees are essential to the success of any business. Most people spend a third of their lives at work.[1] That’s a significant amount of time away from home, apart from the people who make us happy and the things we love to do. So keeping employee motivation high is essential for creating an office environment that gets the best out of our people.

                                            But do you know what motivates your people?

                                            It’s simple:

                                            • Is their work stimulating?
                                            • Does it challenge them?
                                            • Is there room to grow, a promotion perhaps?
                                            • Do you encourage creativity?
                                            • Can they speak openly and honestly with you?
                                            • Do you praise them?
                                            • Do you trust your staff to take ownership of their work?
                                            • Do they feel safe in their work environment?
                                            • And more importantly, do you pay them properly?

                                            Every one of these factors contributes to the general happiness of your employees. It’s what motivates them to come into the office each day and work hard, hit goals, and get results.

                                            In contrast, an unmotivated employee is typically unhappy. They take more sick days, they’re not invested in seeing your business succeed, and they’re always on the lookout for something better.

                                            Stats show that 81 percent of employees would consider leaving their jobs today if the right opportunity presented itself.[2] So it’s up to you to set aside time and energy to create a work environment that benefits every one of your employees.

                                            These seven strategies will help you motivate your people to consistently deliver quality work and, more importantly, to stick around for the long term.

                                            1. Be Someone They Can Rely On

                                            You rely on your people to turn up to work each day, to come to you when they have a problem they can’t solve, to be honest, and to always engage professionally with customers.

                                            Advertising

                                            But this is not a one-way street. You, too, need to be someone your team can rely on. They trust you to have their backs when a client is unreasonable, to know that the decisions they make are in your best interest, and to make good on your promises.

                                            If you say you’ll attend an important meeting, be there. If your company makes a profit and you’ve said you’ll pay a bonus, pay it. The goodwill of your people is something you never want to test, let alone lose.

                                            Be reliable; it’s astounding how much this motivates your people.

                                            2. Create an Awesome Company Culture

                                            There’s no denying that company culture trickles down from the top. Your leadership and attitude massively influences the attitudes, work ethic, and happiness of your staff. If you’re always stressed-out, overly demanding, and unreasonable, it’ll create tension in your office which will adversely affect your employees’ motivation levels.

                                            In fact, the HAYS “US What People Want Survey” found that 47 percent of staff who are actively looking for a new job, pinpoint company culture as the driving force behind their reason to leave.

                                            So if you have high staff turnover, you need to determine whether your company culture might be the motivating factor behind your churn rate.

                                            Here are four ways to build a culture that keeps your employees highly motivated.

                                            • Be conscious of the image you present. Your body language and attitude can positively or negatively impact your employees. So come to work energized. Be optimistic, friendly, and engaging—this enthusiasm will spill over to your people and motivate them to be more productive and efficient.
                                            • Appreciate your people and be reasonable. Celebrate your team’s achievements. If they’re doing a good job, tell them. Encourage them to challenge themselves and try new things. And reward when deserved. If they’re struggling, help them. Work together to find solutions and be a sounding board for their ideas.
                                            • Be flexible. Give your people opportunities to work remotely—this is highly motivating to staff, particularly millennials. They don’t want to be battling traffic each day on their way to work. They don’t want to miss their kids’ baseball games or ballet rehearsals. Stats show that companies that offer flextime and the ability to work from home or a coffee shop have happier and more productive employees.
                                            • Create employee-friendly work environments. These are spaces that inspire and ignite the imagination. Have you ever been to Google’s offices? No headquarter is the same. From indoor slides and food trucks, to hammocks, and funky work pods on the wall, gaming rooms, and tranquil interior gardens, there’s something for everyone. It’s a space where people want to be, catering to their need for creativity, quiet, or team building; you name it.

                                            So take a look at your company culture and ask yourself, Is my business an attractive workplace for talented professionals? Does it inspire commitment and motivate my people? What could I do to improve my company culture?

                                            Advertising

                                            3. Touch Base with Your Team Weekly

                                            Make time for your people, whether you run a remote business or work in an office, set aside time each week to talk to your people one-on-one. It’s non-negotiable.

                                            When there’s an open line of communication between staff members, work gets done. Don’t believe me? A study by Gallup found that 26 percent of employees said feedback from their leaders helps them to do a better job.[3]

                                            Your people want to feel trusted. They want to take ownership of their work, but they also need to know that when they have a question, they can reach out and get answers. If you’re unwilling to make yourself available, your team will quickly become unmotivated, work will stagnate, and your business will stop growing.

                                            So block off time on your calendar each week to touch base with your people, even if only to let them know that what they’re working on matters.

                                            4. Give Them the Tools They Need to Do Their Jobs Well

                                            Imagine trying to run your business without electricity. How would you contact your clients? What would happen when your phone or computer battery died?

                                            Technology is super critical to the success of your businesses. It allows you to work more efficiently, to be more productive, and to handle matters on-the-go. That’s why you need to give your people tools that will make their jobs easier.

                                            Make sure their equipment is in good working condition. There’s nothing more frustrating than a laptop that takes ages to boot up. It’s got to go. Replace outdated software with new software. Don’t make your designer work in Coreldraw; give them access to the most up-to-date version of Adobe Creative Suite. Take it a step further and buy them a subscription to Shutterstock or Getty Images.

                                            Make working for you a pleasure, not a pain; and watch your employees’ motivation levels rise.

                                            Advertising

                                            5. Provide Opportunities to Learn and Upskill

                                            Would you believe me if I told you that 33 percent of people cite boredom and a need for new challenges as the top reason for leaving their job?[4] If you want to retain your talent, you need to upskill.

                                            Thanks to technology, we live in a rapidly evolving world that demands we change with it. A copywriter is no longer just a writer; they now need to be experts in SEO, Google Adwords, CRMs, and so much more.

                                            A pastry chef needs to be a food stylist, photographer, and social media manager. An entrepreneur needs to be a marketer—or at least take ownership of the marketing message for their business—if they hope to scale.

                                            Technology makes all of this possible. No matter your location, your people can continuously expand their knowledge and gain new skill sets—something that’s highly motivating to employees. They want to know that there are opportunities to grow and develop themselves.

                                            If you won’t invest in your people, then your business becomes just another job to tide them over until they find where they truly belong. So be the company that sees value in developing its people.

                                            6. Monitor Their Workload

                                            Overworked employees tend to be unproductive and unhappy. Your people cannot be at full capacity every day, month to month. Something’s got to give. They’ll become deflated and their work will eventually suffer, which will negatively impact your business.

                                            What I like to do is implement a traffic light system. It helps me to keep a finger on the pulse of my business. So there’s red, yellow, and green:

                                            • Red means they’re fully loaded.
                                            • Yellow means they’re busy, but they can potentially take on more.
                                            • Green means they haven’t got enough to do.

                                            I use this traffic light system because I don’t want my team members to be stressed out of their brains all the time. If they are, they won’t make good decisions and they won’t do good work.

                                            Advertising

                                            If my people are regularly overloaded, I have things to think about. Perhaps I need to hire a new person to help ease the load or take a closer look at what projects are good to go, and which can take a back seat.

                                            And this is why #3 is essential. If I’m regularly engaging with my people, I’ll know that while they’re coping with their workload, it is impacting their performance and health, and I’ll take action.

                                            7. Don’t Mess Around with Your Employees’ Pay

                                            Never mess around with your people’s salary. As a business owner or high-level manager, it’s easy to forget that most people live from paycheck to paycheck. Delayed compensation can mean a missed bill payment, which could result in costly penalties they can’t afford or hits to their credit score.

                                            So it’s your job to ensure that you pay your people on time.

                                            The Bottom Line

                                            A motivated team is an asset to any business. These people never give up. They get excited about coming to work each day and can’t wait to test a new theory or tackle a particularly tricky challenge. They’re proud of the work they do. And more importantly, they have no reason to leave.

                                            Wouldn’t you rather be part of their success story than the business that drove them away?

                                            More to Motivate Your Team

                                            Featured photo credit: Emma Dau via unsplash.com

                                            Reference

                                            Read Next