Advertising
Advertising

10 of the Most Hated Types of Employees

10 of the Most Hated Types of Employees

We have all met them, haven’t we? The slackers, the workaholics, the time wasters, the slow workers, the overambitious ones and the brown nosers. In short, these are the types of colleagues we wish we’d never had, yet they are always around. A recent Gallup poll showed that in general, employees tend to be unhappy, with as many as 70% hating their jobs. You can be sure that many of those will fit the descriptions below or they will be the cause of much of the discontent in the workplace. Here are the 10 types of employees who are undoubtedly hated universally. If one of these rings a bell with you or seems like you, it may be time to change your working style!

1. The ones who always miss the deadline

He or she may be the one who tells you quite calmly that she has forgotten all about that task and it has not even been done yet. When this is combined with a ‘no big deal’ attitude, then this is even more irritating. Whether you are a fellow team member or a manager, this can be infuriating – especially if it becomes an ingrained habit. Even worse are the excuses offered as to why this has happened.

The manager will have to decide whether the employee can be helped. There may be weaknesses in the planning stages, which skew the timing. This may need micromanaging for a short time to see what exactly is going on.

Advertising

There is also the issue of the worker trying to make a good impression and offering to do the task in the first place. This is usually because they are unaware of their limitations and they think that trying to gain brownie points is what counts.

2. The perfectionists who make life unbearable for everyone else

The problem with these people is that they often project their own fear of failure onto their co-workers and they become overcritical. They pounce on every little mistake. If they are in any managerial role, they often find it impossible to delegate. They always think they are the only ones who can get the job done properly. These perfectionists make teamwork almost impossible. If they spent more time in aiming for 80% perfect rather than 100%, then life would be easier for everybody. This would help to focus on the really important issues.

3. The time wasters

There are lots of ways you can waste time at work, if you are so inclined. People take extra long coffee breaks, for example. I once had a colleague who was always dashing out to the bank – we all wondered how many millions she had stashed away! Then there are all the other things that compete for their attention. Cigarette breaks, going out to do some shopping, chatting to colleagues and keeping up with office politics. Little work gets completed but they do not seem to care. Just look at the statistics from the UK. Up to 5 work days are wasted a year in just chatting to colleagues.

Advertising

4. The Internet surfers

These are not just the normal time wasters mentioned above because they actually appearto be working, rather than wandering around doing nothing! They are at their desk but they specialize only in the internet. It makes them feel terribly important and up to date! How can you miss sending a Tweet or catching up on Facebook? Online shopping is another favorite. Did you know that almost two thirds of workers (64%) surf the Internet every day at work and the sites they are visiting have nothing to do with their job? That means that deadlines are missed and work is left undone.

5. The workaholics

These people are often either using work as cover for deeply rooted psychological and social problems or they are simply driven by blind ambition. It is really an addiction to work. The problem is that there is a deeply rooted conviction that working extra long hours is a virtue rather than a vice. This will take a long time to eradicate. It takes great determination and not a little courage to go home at 5pm, as this working mother reports here.

6. The negative workers

These people are the first to point out obstacles, problems, and pessimistic forecasts. This affects the atmosphere for everybody and negativity can and does get people down. These people are usually first class whiners and always complaining. The problem is that this attitude can be contagious and affects general morale unless it is nipped in the bud. Finding out what is really causing the negativity is an essential step in dealing with this, if you are a manager or team leader. You will definitely need active listening skills!

Advertising

7. The gossipers

Gossipers create fear, resentment, worry and negativity. They thrive on office politics. It can be destructive, although sometimes it may be used humorously. If you are a manager, you may have to confront the perpetrators and make them aware that their activities are causing problems and not helping staff morale at all. Managers have to be very careful that they ‘walk the talk’ and not indulge in any office gossip themselves. This is important if they are to change the current atmosphere, and it takes both time and effort.

8. The loudmouths

Usually, these people are the ones who have not yet discovered their own volume control. Everybody around them suffers as conversations are conducted at stereophonic volume. This usually goes hand in hand with being a show off so they are impossible to ignore. Secretly, everybody hates them, but they are usually oblivious to all this.

9. The slobs

I remember a teaching colleague of mine whose desk consisted of a mountain of papers. He did go on to become a successful architect but at the time, it made life difficult for both students and colleagues. Being a slob really can be very off putting – especially when it comes to matters of personal hygiene, eating and drinking habits and not to mention tidying up papers. If their cubicle is a hazard, management will notice and their chances of promotion and getting raises may end up in the rubbish bin too!

Advertising

10. The ignorant ones who know nothing about e-mail etiquette

Incredible to think that there are still people out there who resort to shouting online by using the caps lock all the time when they send or reply to an e-mail! Have they been living under a rock? It would appear so, but there are lots of things to watch out for to make sure that you yourself are not guilty. Some people insist on marking e-mails a top priority when they are merely standard messages. This tends to get boring and very soon, colleagues switch off and will not even read them.

They also tend to copy everybody in when there are actually a few people actively concerned with the issue. Very often, a phone call is much more effective if only one or two people are actually involved. You can find a full list of the standard netiquette rules here.

Which working styles tend to irritate you and how have you dealt with them? Let us know in the comments.

Featured photo credit: Facebook on the computer/English 106 via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Freelance writer

10 Simple Morning Exercises That Will Make You Feel Great All Day 40 Powerful Productivity Quotes From Highly Successful People 10 Toxic Persons You Should Just Get Rid Of 10 Reasons Why People Are Unmotivated (And Ways to Be Motivated) Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

Trending in Work

110 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader 217 Versatile Work Skills Employers Want to See in Potential Employees 317 Tactics to Drastically Improve Communication in Relationships 4What are MBTI Types and How Can They Affect Your Career Choices? 5How to Use Visual Learning to Boost Your Career or Business

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

When you try to think of a leader at your place of work, you might think of your boss – you know, the supervisor in the tasteful office down the hall.

However, bosses are not the only leaders in the office, and not every boss has mastered the art of excellent leadership. Maybe the best leader you know is the co-worker sitting at the desk next to yours who is always willing to loan out her stapler and help you problem solve.

You see, a boss’ main priority is to efficiently cross items off of the corporate to-do list, while a true leader both completes tasks and works to empower and motivate the people he or she interacts with on a daily basis.

A leader is someone who works to improve things instead of focusing on the negatives. People acknowledge the authority of a boss, but people cherish a true leader.

Puzzled about what it takes to be a great leader? Let’s take a look at the difference between a boss and a leader, and why cultivating quality leadership skills is essential for people who really want to make a positive impact.

1. Leaders are compassionate human beings; bosses are cold.

It can be easy to equate professionalism with robot-like impersonal behavior. Many bosses stay holed up in their offices and barely ever interact with staff.

Even if your schedule is packed, you should always make time to reach out to the people around you. Remember that when you ask someone to share how they are feeling, you should be prepared to be vulnerable and open in your communication as well.

Does acting human at the office sound silly? It’s not.

A lack of compassion in the office leads to psychological turmoil, whereas positive connection leads to healthier staff.[1]

If people feel that you are being open, honest and compassionate with them, they will feel able to approach your office with what is on their minds, leading to a more productive and stress-free work environment.

Advertising

2. Leaders say “we”; bosses say “I”.

Practice developing a team-first mentality when thinking and speaking. In meetings, talk about trying to meet deadlines as a team instead of using accusatory “you” phrases. This makes it clear that you are a part of the team, too, and that you are willing to work hard and support your team members.

Let me explain:

A “we” mentality shifts the office dynamic from “trying to make the boss happy” to a spirit of teamwork, goal-setting, and accomplishment.

A “we” mentality allows for the accountability and community that is essential in the modern day workplace.

3. Leaders develop and invest in people; bosses use people.

Unfortunately, many office climates involve people using others to get what they want or to climb the corporate ladder. This is another example of the “me first” mentality that is so toxic in both office environments and personal relationships.

Instead of using others or focusing on your needs, think about how you can help other people grow.

Use your building blocks of compassion and team-mentality to stay attuned to the needs of others note the areas in which you can help them develop. A great leader wants to see his or her people flourish.

Make a list of ways you can invest in your team members to help them develop personally and professionally, and then take action!

4. Leaders respect people; bosses are fear-mongering.

Earning respect from everyone on your team will take time and commitment, but the rewards are worth every ounce of effort.

A boss who is a poor leader may try to control the office through fear and bully-like behavior. Employees who are petrified about their performance or who feel overwhelmed and stressed by unfair deadlines are probably working for a boss who uses a fear system instead of a respect system.

Advertising

What’s the bottom line?

Work to build respect among your team by treating everyone with fairness and kindness. Maintain a positive tone and stay reliable for those who approach you for help.

5. Leaders give credit where it’s due; bosses only take credits.

Looking for specific ways to gain respect from your colleagues and employees? There is no better place to start than with the simple act of giving credit where it is due.

Don’t be tempted to take credit for things you didn’t do, and always go above and beyond to generously acknowledge those who worked on a project and performed well.

You might be wondering how you can get started:

  • Begin by simply noticing which team member contributes what during your next project at work.
  • If possible, make mental notes. Remember that these notes should not be about ways in which team members are failing, but about ways in which they are excelling.
  • Depending on your leadership style, let people know how well they are doing either in private one-on-one meetings or in a group setting. Be honest and generous in your communication about a person’s performance.

6. Leaders see delegation as their best friend; bosses see it as an enemy.

If delegation is a leader’s best friend, then micromanagement is the enemy.

Delegation equates to trust and micromanagement equates to distrust. Nothing is more frustrating for an employee than feeling that his or her every movement is being critically observed.

Encourage trust in your office by delegating important tasks and acknowledging that your people are capable, smart individuals who can succeed!

Delegation is a great way to cash in on the positive benefits of a psychological phenomenon called a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a self-fulfilling prophecy, a person’s expectations of another person can cause the expectations to be fulfilled.[2]

In other words, if you truly believe that your team member can handle a project or task, he or she is more likely to deliver.

Advertising

Learn how to delegate in my other article:

How to Delegate Work (the Definitive Guide for Successful Leaders)

7. Leaders work hard; bosses let others do the work.

Delegation is not an excuse to get out of hard work. Instead of telling people to go accomplish the hardest work alone, make it clear that you are willing to pitch in and help with the hardest work of all when the need arises.

Here’s the deal:

Showing others that you work hard sets the tone for your whole team and will spur them on to greatness.

The next time you catch yourself telling someone to “go”, a.k.a accomplish a difficult task alone, change your phrasing to “let’s go”, showing that you are totally willing to help and support.

8. Leaders think long-term; bosses think short-term.

A leader who only utilizes short-term thinking is someone who cannot be prepared or organized for the future. Your colleagues or staff members need to know that they can trust you to have a handle on things not just this week, but next month or even next year.

Display your long-term thinking skills in group talks and meetings by sharing long-term hopes or concerns. Create plans for possible scenarios and be prepared for emergencies.

For example, if you know that you are losing someone on your team in a few months, be prepared to share a clear plan of how you and the remaining team members can best handle the change and workload until someone new is hired.

9. Leaders are like your colleagues; bosses are just bosses.

Another word for colleague is collaborator. Make sure your team knows that you are “one of them” and that you want to collaborate or work side by side.

Advertising

Not getting involved in the going ons of the office is a mistake because you will miss out on development and connection opportunities.

As our regular readers know, I love to remind people of the importance of building routines into each day. Create a routine that encourages you to leave your isolated office and collaborate with others. Spark healthy habits that benefit both you and your co-workers.

10. Leaders put people first; bosses put results first.

Bosses without crucial leadership training may focus on process and results instead of people. They may stick to a pre-set systems playbook even when employees voice new ideas or concerns.

Ignoring people’s opinions for the sake of company tradition like this is never truly beneficial to an organization.

Here’s what I mean by process over people:

Some organizations focus on proper structures or systems as their greatest assets instead of people. I believe that people lend real value to an organization, and that focusing on the development of people is a key ingredient for success in leadership.

Learning to be a leader is an ongoing adventure.

This list of differences makes it clear that, unlike an ordinary boss, a leader is able to be compassionate, inclusive, generous, and hard-working for the good of the team.

Instead of being a stereotypical scary or micromanaging-obsessed boss, a quality leader is able to establish an atmosphere of respect and collaboration.

Whether you are new to your work environment or a seasoned administrator, these leadership traits will help you get a jump start so that you can excel as a leader and positively impact the people around you.

For more inspiration and guidance, you can even start keeping tabs on some of the world’s top leadership experts. With an adventurous and positive attitude, anyone can learn good leadership.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next