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10 Dream Jobs You Never Knew Existed

10 Dream Jobs You Never Knew Existed

We all have a dream job, but whether it’s in sports, entertainment or science, it seems there’s always some days we’d rather be somewhere else. We can all list off a few jobs that spark our imaginations, but some lesser-known opportunities are simply magnetic. From snoozing for cash to traveling the world to drink tea, these 10 unexpected dream jobs will surely have you picturing your new resume.

Professional Snuggler

    ▲ Janet Treviño, Professional snuggler

    • Duty: Professional snugglers platonicly snuggle with clients in a cuddle session. The cuddle session is usually conducted in a studio. In the session, the interaction between the professional snuggler and client is not limited to snuggling. They can chat, have a meal, play chess… as long as it stays platonic.
    • Salary: Conventionally $1 per minute. Each cuddle session lasts for 15 minutes to 5 hours. The hourly rate can rise to as high as $1.5 per minute for more experienced snugglers.
    • Example: Janet Treviño, a full-time snuggler working in San Antonio, U.S.. She charges clients $80 per hour and spends around 20 hours a week cuddling people. Started in August 2016 as a part-time snuggler, she soon realized the overwhelming demand for cuddles and turned full-time a month later. She even has her own website to promote herself!

    Stand-In

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      ▲ The real Bruce Willis and the other “Bruce Willis”s

      • Duty: Stand-ins substitute the actor/actress before filming, typically for the time-consuming technical purposes such as lighting and camera setup. They usually share similar physical characteristics with the actor/actress. They allow directors to adjust the lighting and camera setup to obtain the more visually brilliant cinematographic outcome even in the absence of the actors and actresses.
      • Salary: A stand-in earns on average $33000 a year. The income is highly dependent on multiple factors which may make the number fluctuating.[1]
      • Example: Adam Bryant, the stand-in for Robin Williams, has been working with the star for a very long time.

      Gumologist

        ▲ Jesse Kiefer, a Gumologist for Cadbury Schweppes

        • Duty: Gumologists taste gums and review new products and developments for chewing gum companies. They play a crucial role especially in designing new flavours. Gumologists need to have the ability to distinguish over 70 ingredients from a pack of gum.
        • Salary: Approximately $37,400 – $107,500 a year, dependent on experience
        • Example: Jesse Kiefer, the chief gumologist at Cadbury’s Gum Center of Excellence in New Jersey

        Chocolatier

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          ▲ Stéphane Bonnat from Bonnat Chocolatier

          • Duty: A chocolatier is basically an artist with chocolate. Chocolatiers make all sorts of confectionery out of chocolate. Not to be confused them from chocolate makers who turn cacao beans and other ingredients to the treats. Chocolatiers work with chocolate exclusively and craft them into incredible treats, desserts, and candies to delight customers of all ages.
          • Salary: Average salary is $21,000 according to Simply Hired but the number can vary significantly based on the brand, experience and location.
          • Example: Stéphane Bonnat from Bonnat Chocolatier , the gold prize winner of the 2016 International Chocolate Awards in Plain/Origin Dark Bar Categories.

          Personal Shopper

            ▲ Belly Halbreich, personal shopper

            • Duty: Usually work with one person (and usually with renowned celebrity or businessman!) or fashion magazines, personal shoppers are fully in charge of keeping the wardrobe filled with the latest must-buys in the fashion industry.
            • Salary: Around $34,500 a year. For well-established personal shopper, the salary can rise up to a stunning $300,000 annually.[2]
            • Example: Belly Halbreich, probably the most famous personal shopper on the planet, has been working at Bergdorf Goodman for 37 year and has dressed celebrities like Lauren Bacall and Joan Rivers.

            Tea Taster

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              ▲ Sebastian Michaelis, the tea taster whose tongue is insured

              • Duty: Literally, sipping tea. Tea tasters are expected to taste up to 200 cups of tea a day and must be versed in every type of tea imaginable. Tea tasters are required travel around the world to test new suppliers and products. Pretty alluring huh? We are deeply sorry for those sensitive to caffeine.
              • Salary: Tea tasters earn an annual salary of $38,000[3]
              • Example: Sebastian Michaelis whose taste buds are so incredibly outstanding Tetley, the tea manufacturer, has insured his tongue for a stunning 1 Million pounds. Fun fact, his tongue is now as valuable as Madonna’s breasts, Heidi Klum’s legs and Julia Robert’s smile.

              Voice Actor

                ▲ Tom Kenny, the voice actor for the title character Spongebob in Spongebob Squarepants

                • Duty: Unlike regular actors who require outstanding body gestures and facial expressions, voice actors vitalize an animated character by their voice. One important thing to note is that they never appear on camera, so they can show up in whatever suits them. Pajamas. Onesies. Suits. Night gowns. Anything we can think of as long as our vocal cords are functioning.
                • Salary: Voice actors earn around $29,000 a year. The salary is dependent on experience which an entry level voice actor is expected to earn $17,000 a year while an experienced one can earn up to $76,000.[4]
                • Example: Tom Kenny. You might not know his name but you must have definitely heard his voice. Tom Kenny is the voice actor of the title character Spongebob in the Spongebob SquarePants TV series and films.

                Waterslide Tester

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                  Sebastian Smith, world’s first waterslide tester

                  • Duty: Waterslide tester is probably the best summer job ever. Waterslide testers travel around the world and ride on exhilarating chutes, flumes and slides. After that, they rate the rides on two factors, “Biggest Splash” and “Adrenaline Factor”. All expenses covered. There’s nothing better than a paid vacation, right?
                  • Salary: 20,000 pounds a year (approximately $30, 000)[5]
                  • Example: Sebastian Smith, a student who beat off competition from 2,000 applicants, was reported to be the first waterslide tester which he travelled around the globe to test and review on slides and venues.

                  Netflix Tagger

                    • Duty: Netflix taggers are required to watch hours of latest contents on Netflix, then enter key describing words into the system for each show. This is done for Netflix users to search for shows more easily.
                    • Salary: Not indicated by Netflix but it is paid on good hourly rate and is a part-time job
                    • Example: N/A, but it is known to be a part-time job which can work remotely (that means our HOME!). For your information, Netflix just hired taggers to watch kids’ contents last September. So, be ready to regularly check on Netflix to hunt on your dream job.

                    Professional Sleeper

                      • Duty: Whether they’re sleeping for scientific studies or for NASA, professional sleepers have the literal dream job.
                      • Salary: Around $15,000 a year, but can vary due to company, location and experience[6]
                      • Example: Pat Phillips from Boston, is paid to participate in sleep research projects at area hospitals. Helsinki Hotel, for example, hired professional sleepers to test out on their beds and write about the experience in blogposts.

                      Reference

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                      Alicia Prince

                      A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

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                      Last Updated on December 3, 2019

                      7 Powerful Steps to Achieve Career Success

                      7 Powerful Steps to Achieve Career Success

                      I often hear people say, “I want to be successful but don’t know where to start” or “I’ve achieved career success yet I’m not happy.” And then I ask, “what does career success mean to you?” And many have a hard time articulating their response with much conviction.

                      It’s common that people lack clarity, focus, and direction. And when you layer on thoughts and actions that are misaligned with your values, this only adds to your misdirected quest to achieve your career success.

                      A word of caution. It’s going to take some time for you to think about and work on your own path for career success. You need to set aside time and be intentional about the steps you take to achieve career success. In my opinion, this step-by-step guide is apart of your life philosophy.

                      1. Define Career Success for Yourself

                      Pause. Give yourself time and space for self-reflection.

                      What does career success mean to you?

                      This is about defining your career success:

                      • Not what you think you ‘should’ do
                      • Not what people may think of you
                      • Not adjusting to friends and family’s judgements
                      • Not taking actions based on societal or community norms

                      “A flower does not think of competing to the flower next to it. It just blooms” – Zen Shin

                      When you strip away all your external influences and manage your inner critic, what are you left with? You need to define career success that best suits your life situation.

                      There’s no fixed answer. Everyone is different. Your answer will evolve and be impacted by life events. Here are a few examples of career success:

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                      • Work-life balance
                      • Opportunities for growth and advancement
                      • Feeling valued that my contributions had an impact

                      Now even as you reflect on the examples above, the descriptions are not specific enough. You’ve got to take it deeper:

                      • What do you mean by work-life balance?
                      • What do you consider to be opportunities for growth and advancement?
                      • How do you like to be recognized for your work? How do you know if your contributions have had an impact?

                      Let’s take a look at some potential responses to the questions above:

                      • I want more time with my family, and less stress at work
                      • I want increased responsibilities, to manage a team, a higher income, and the prestige of working at a certain level in the company
                      • I’d like my immediate leader to send me a thank-you note or take me out for coffee to genuinely express her or his gratitude. I’ll know I’ve made an impact if I get feedback from my coworkers, leaders and other stakeholders.

                      Further questions to reflect on to help narrow the focus for the above responses:

                      • What are some opportunities that can help you get traction on getting more time with your family? And decrease your stress at work?
                      • What’s most important for you in the next 12 months?
                      • What’s the significance of receiving others’ feedback?

                      Now, I’m only scratching the surface with these examples. It takes time to do the inner work and build a solid foundation.

                      Start this exercise by first asking what career success means to you and then ask yourself meaningful questions to help you dig deeper.

                      What types of themes emerge from your responses? What keywords or phrases keep coming up for you?

                      2. Know Your Values

                      Values are the principles and beliefs that guide your decisions, behaviors and actions. When you’re not aligned with your values and act in a way that conflicts with your beliefs, it’ll feel like life is a struggle.

                      There are simple value exercises that can help you quickly determine your core values. This one designed by Carnegie Mellon University can help you discover your top 5 values.[1]

                      Once you have your top 5 values keep them visible. Your brain needs reminders that these are your top values. Here are some ways to make them stick:

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                      • Write them on cue cards or notes and post it in your office
                      • Take a picture of your values and use it as a screensaver on your phone
                      • Put the words on your fridge
                      • Add the words on your vision board

                      Where will your value words be placed in your physical environment so that you have a constant reminder of them?

                      3. Define Your Short-Term and Long-Term Goals

                      When writing your short-term and long term life goals, use the SMART framework – Specific Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. Treat this as a brainstorming exercise. Your potential and possibilities are limitless.

                      How you define short-term and long-term is entirely up to you. Short-term can be 30 days, 90 days, or 6 months. Maybe long-term goals are 4 months, 1 year, or 10 years.

                      Here are a few self-reflection questions to help you write your goals:[2]

                      • What would you want to do today if you had the power to make it the way you want?
                      • If no hurdles are in the way, what would you like to achieve?
                      • If you have the freedom to do whatever you want, what would it be?
                      • What type of impact do you want to have on people?
                      • Who are the people you most admire? What is it about them or what they have that you’d want for your life or career?
                      • What activities energize you? What’s one activity you most love?

                      Remember to revisit your core values as you refine yours goals:

                      • Are your goals in or out of alignment with your core values?
                      • What adjustments do you need to make to your goals? Maybe some of your goals can be deleted because they no longer align with your values.
                      • How attainable are your goals? Breakdown your goals into digestible pieces.
                      • Do your short-term goals move you towards attaining your long-term goals?

                      Get very clear and specific about your goals. Think about an archer – a person who shoots with a bow and arrows at a target. This person is laser focused on the target – the center of the bullseye. The target is your goal.

                      By focusing on one goal at a time and having that goal visible, you can behave and act in ways that will move you closer to your goal.

                      4. Determine Your Top Talents

                      What did you love doing as a kid? What made these moments fun? What did you have a knack for? What did you most cherish about these times? What are the common themes?

                      What work feels effortless? What work do you do that doesn’t seem like work? Think about work you can lose track of time doing and you don’t even feel tired of it.[3]

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                      What are your desires? Try it out. Experiment. Take action and start. How can you incorporate more of this type of work into your daily life?

                      What themes emerge from your responses? How do your responses compare to your responses from the values exercise and your goals?

                      What do you notice?

                      5. Identify ‘Feeling’ Words You Want to Experience

                      Do you have tendencies to use your head or heart to make decisions?

                      I have a very strong tendency to make rational, practical, and fact-based decisions using my head. It’s very rare for me to make decisions using my emotions. I was forced to learn how to make more intuitive decisions by listening to my gut when I was struggling with pivotal life decisions. I was forced to feel and listen to my inner voice to make decisions that feel most natural to me. This was very unfamiliar to me, however, it expanded my identity.

                      Review this list of Feeling Words. Use the same technique you use for the values exercise to narrow down how you want to feel.

                      Keep these words visible too!

                      Review your responses. What do you observe? What insights do you gain from these responses and those in the above steps?

                      6. Be Willing to Sit with Discomfort

                      Make career decisions aligned with your values, goals, talents and feelings. This is not for the faint hearted. It takes real work, courage and willingness to cut out the noise around you. You’ll need to sit with discomfort for a bit until you build up your muscle to hit the targets you want.

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                      Surround yourself with a supportive network to help you through these times.

                      “These pains you feel are messengers. Listen to them” – Rumi

                      7. Manage Your Own Career

                      Not to be cynical, but no one can make you happy but yourself. If you don’t take control of your career and manage it like your own business – no one will.

                      Discern between things that you can control and what you can’t control. For example, you may not be able to control who gets a promotion. However, you can control how you react to it and what you’ve learned about yourself in that situation.

                      Summing Up

                      For many who have gone through a career change or been impacted by life events, these steps may seem very basic. However, it’s sometimes the basics that we forget to do. The simple things and moments can edge us closer to our larger vision for ourselves.

                      Staying present and appreciating what you have today can sometimes help you achieve your long-term goals. For example, if you’re always talking about not having enough time and wanting work-life balance, think about what was good in your work day? Maybe you took a walk outside with your co-workers. This could be a small step to help you reframe how you can attain work-life balance.

                      Remember to take time for yourself. Hit pause, notice, observe and reflect to achieve career success by getting deliberate and intentional:

                      1. Define Career Success for Yourself
                      2. Know Your Values
                      3. Define Your Short-Term and Long-Term Life and Goals
                      4. Determine Your Top Talents
                      5. Identify ‘Feeling’ Words You Want to Experience
                      6. Be Willing to sit with Discomfort
                      7. Manage Your Own Career

                      “When you stop chasing the wrong things you give the right things a chance to catch you.” – Lolly Daskal

                      Good luck and best wishes always!

                      More Tips on Advancing Your Career

                      Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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