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10 Common Characteristics of Average People

10 Common Characteristics of Average People

The world is filled with two types of people: successful people and average people. There are plenty of resources online if you want to learn how to be successful, but what about those who are only looking to achieve adequacy? If you’re shooting for the big dog pile at the bottom, here are 10 common characteristics of average people to aim for:

1 – Average People Had That Idea First

Anytime you hear about something cool and new, there’s always someone who had that idea first. iPhone? I could’ve invented that. Amazon? I was telling people about online shopping years before they existed. We all have millions of ideas – it’s the person who takes the lead and acts on those ideas that gets all the glory. Nobody cares what you could’ve done if only you had made the right decision.

You weren’t just one wrong move away from achieving fame and fortune. Overnight success only exists for people willing to claw and climb their way to the top for years with little to no recognition, money, or energy. Put in two years of sleepless nights slaving away at thousands of pages of code…then you won’t need to tell me the story of how you invented social media. I’ll hear about it from someone else.

2 – Average People Waste Time

I work a lot. It doesn’t feel like work because I love what I do, but I’m almost constantly doing something for my job. Every successful person I know has the same work ethic. Sure, I can get a hold of someone for a quick meal or drink, but we don’t hang out day in and day out — we’re just too busy for that. Average people don’t prioritize their life this way.

Average people are always finding ways to get out of work. No matter what you may have seen in a commercial, there’s no easy button to life. If you’re not working towards your dreams, you’ll never reach them. Either you’ll make a career out of a menial job, or you’ll shift back and forth between entry level drudgery until you retire or die. Along the road to success, you’ll meet plenty of people who want to waste your time. You only have so much time in the day, and how you utilize that time is up to you. Whether you want to be a rapper, superhero, or scientist, your time is better spent in the lab than partying.

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3 – Average People Are Always Broke

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    Dude… if you’re broke for a few years while busting your ass toward a goal, you’re going to be successful. If you’re broke longer than that, you’re average. You need a savings account, and you need to stop spending money. Pay off your debt and keep all your bills current. Start living within your means. Just because you see Lil Wayne on TV bragging about all the money he has doesn’t mean you have those same means. If you keep buying Cristal on a Coors budget, you’ll get kicked out the club.

    Stop eating out. When your friends ask you to go out, be honest about not having money to go. Just because you have $200 in your savings account doesn’t mean you have to spend it, and how much you have saved up is nobody’s business but your own (and your partner, if that’s a mutual decision you’ve come to). You don’t need the latest and greatest of every gadget that ever comes out. Make do with what you have. There’s entirely too much free stuff out there in the world for you to waste your hard earned money on frivolous things.

    4 – Average People Talk More Than They Act

    I spent my early 20s halfheartedly pursuing a career in the music business on the side of my day job and school. Although I decided to pursue other career options, I learned a lot about the music business from the experience. You’ll constantly meet musicians if you go out and about town – they’re everywhere. The problem is that most of these self-proclaimed “musicians” aren’t actually making any money in the business. They have nothing more than a pipe-dream. If they were really going to explode on the scene like they tell it, you’d be hearing about them from someone else, and they’d be too busy working to talk to you.

    That was just one example. People constantly talk about a book they should write or how interesting their life is as though their birth and the events of their lives entitle them to some sort of celebration. These people sit around their entire lives with their hands out, waiting to be “discovered” and given instant super-stardom. They think that by telling everyone they’re already successful, they can trick their way into becoming the person of their dreams. Unfortunately they end up dying as just your average broke dreamer who never lived up to their potential.

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    5 – Average People Focus on the Past

    We all have complicated pasts. It’s not like we all spend decades on Earth and nobody but you ever gets cheated, swindled, hurt, or worse. Everyone is a three-dimensional human being with many facets in their lives. We all have our own unique perspectives and experiences. My point is that you’re not alone — we’re all suffering.

    Average people focus on their past. I’m not saying you should be a robot or drone with no feelings or history. Missing your childhood doesn’t bring it back. You can’t turn back time. You only get one chance at life, so make it count. The past and future only exist in your mind. What happened to you at 12 years old isn’t affecting whether or not you wake up today, eat anything, and go to sleep. Brush that chip off your shoulder and perk up. Focus on the here and now, and you’ll find yourself in more than average situations.

    6 – Average People Have Lottery Dreams

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      When I win the lottery, I’m finally going to straighten out my life, because money is the source of all my unhappiness — surely an influx in cash will provide everything I need. When I win the lottery, I’m going to fix-up my backyard, finish all my projects, travel, make time to care about my family, and accomplish everything else that I’m too lazy to do right now.

      None of these are unobtainable dreams or goals, but you have to be willing to put in the work. You’re going to suck at first, but you’ll learn by doing. Planning is great, but executing plans requires disciplined actions. I’m a writer living with a teacher in the summer. Instead of stressing about work, she’s off for the summer, and I work from home. We haven’t had to leave the house for much more than recreation and the occasional errand in weeks. I get paid to fly kites, play video games, read the news, and surf the internet all day. I couldn’t tell you the last time I got out of my pajamas and loungewear.

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      I didn’t win the lottery. No external easy button came along and changed my life. I put my nose to the grindstone and worked 24/7 to get where I’m at, and I’m still not even close to my goal. I have a comfortable life, and it didn’t take money to obtain. It took patience, resourcefulness, perseverance, and the willingness to adapt. Instead of sitting around planning the garden I’d have built if I could afford it, I tilled, watered, and fertilized the soil. I planted my own seeds, and nurtured my life my way. I put in the work, and reaped the rewards. Keep your lottery ticket.

      7 – Average People Think Inside the Box

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        When lucky enough to be approached by the occasional box while meandering down the path of life, the average person will jump in it like a cat or toddler to play and begin thinking completely within said box. By contrast, successful people stand outside the box like grown folk, shaking their heads at the absurdity of the scene. Your problems aren’t as black and white as you think, and they’re certainly nothing to get worked up about. If the tragic event in your life isn’t being broadcast on the news, it’s because you’re experiencing something everyone goes through. Since the world isn’t going to end based on your decision, don’t put too much thought into it.

        One of the best ways to gain other perspectives is to communicate with someone you trust. Whether it’s a parent, child, partner, friend, or therapist, talk your problems out with someone. They may see an angle you didn’t, even if it’s some wonky work mumbo jumbo. If you need to figure out a difficult problem or just identify some unknowable in your life, family and friends are a great resource. Worst case scenario, you discover you can’t depend on any of them and can move on to some new people — a valuable life lesson.

        8 – Average People Are Never Responsible

        A Democrat or Republican in office never did much to change my daily life. God isn’t responsible for pulling each individual out of the gutter. We all deal with terrible people, but I’ve most definitely met more good people than bad. If you’re not getting the point yet, we’re all responsible for our own lives. We create our own reality with our own effort.

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        Successful people understand this concept and spend their time working. Average people watch TV and play on the internet, wondering why nothing is changing in their lives — it must be because of your age, race, beliefs, bad luck, or anything else you can blame it on. It rains on everyone, my friend. You make the decision whether to run, stand in the rain, avoid it, use an umbrella, help people around you, or just dance.

        9 – Average People Have Unfinished Projects

        The average person constantly starts something new and wants to explore it…until things get difficult. Once the going gets tough, the average fluff loses their gruff, while the tough get rough. Don’t start golf, spend $3,000 on equipment, then decide you don’t like it, and take up video games, which costs hundreds to thousands of dollars per year. Don’t be a sneaker head who lounges on the couch watching cable TV all day, draining electricity, and wasting money — walk a mile in your shoes, and if you fill them, they will come.

        Have a guitar you never play? Sell it. Is there a huge truck taking up half your backyard that you’re incapable of fixing or moving? Tow it. Your dead goldfish, ornery dog, barren garden, dirty laundry, etc. are giving people the impression you’re not in control of your life. You’re missing out on all these important aspects of your life because you’re focusing on the wrong things: work, bills, your overbearing boss, car troubles, rent, mortgage, insurance, what other people are doing, celebrities’ lives, and oh so many other unnecessary burdens on your brain. Either shit or get off the toilet – finish those projects, or salvage/sell the materials. Stop saving your best for a later date; it’ll never come.

        10 – Average People Choose Average Lives

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          The President of the United States is no average person. Barrack Obama is the leader of one of the largest civilizations on Earth. He didn’t get there by choosing an average life — Obama chose leadership. He put in the work, and he took the reigns (that’s not a typo). Because he chose that life, he made decisions to bring himself toward that life. He didn’t hang out with his friends while secretly harboring his political aspirations. POTUS put himself out there.

          If you want to be average, all you have to do is keep your dreams and goals to yourself. Do nothing to accomplish them. After enough years go by and you realize the world doesn’t stop for you, keep telling everyone about all of your past accomplishments. Soon you’ll start hating the music, TV, and movies you ignored life for. You’ll yearn for the good ol’ days you’ll never get back. Life doesn’t have a reset button. You had your shot, and you chose an average life. Now enjoy the fruits of obscurity… or change your destiny.

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          Last Updated on April 6, 2020

          How to Make a Career Change at 50 for Great Opportunities

          How to Make a Career Change at 50 for Great Opportunities

          Turning 50 is a milestone in anyone’s life, after all you are half way to 100! But seriously, turning 50 is often a time in life when people can sit back and take a look at where they’ve been and contemplate what the future holds.

          Can you change careers at 50? It’s not uncommon for people in their 50’s to consider a career change, after all if you’ve spent 20 to 30 years in a career, chances are that some of the bloom is off the rose.

          Often, when we are starting out in our 20’s, we choose a career path based on factors that are no longer relevant to us in our 50’s. Things like our parents’ expectations, a fast paced exciting lifestyle or the lure of making a lot of money can all be motivating factors in our 20’s.

          But in our 50’s, those have given way to other priorities. Things like the desire to spend more time with family and friends, a slower paced less stressful lifestyle, the need to care for a sick spouse or elderly parents can all contribute to wanting a career change in your 50’s.

          Just like any big life changing event, changing careers is scary. The good news is that just like most things we are scared of, the fear is mostly in our own head.

          Understanding how to go about a career change at 50 and what you can expect should help reduce the anxiety and fear of the unknown.

          What are Your Goals for a Career Change?

          As in any endeavor, having properly defined goals will help you to determine the best path to take.

          What are you looking for in a new career? Choosing a slower less stressful position that gives you more time with family and friends may sound ideal, but you’ll often find that you’re giving up some income and job satisfaction in the process.

          Conversely, if your goal is to quit a job that is sucking the life from your soul to pursue a lifelong passion. You might be trading quality time with family and friends for job satisfaction.

          Neither decision is wrong or bad, you just need to be aware of the potential pitfalls of any decision you make.

          Types of Career Changes at 50+

          There are four main types of career changes that people make in their 50’s. Each type has it’s unique set of challenges and will very in the degree of preparation required to make the change.

          Industry Career Change

          In this career change, a person remains in the same field but switches industries.

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          With an industry change, a person takes their set of skills and applies them to an industry that they have no previous experience in.

          An example would be a salesperson in the oil and gas industry becoming a salesperson for a media (advertising) company. They are taking their skill set (selling) and applying it to a different industry (media).

          This type of career change is best accomplished by doing a lot of homework on the industry you want to get into as well as networking within the industry.

          Functional Career Change

          A functional career change would be a change of careers within the same industry.

          For example, an accountant at a pharmaceutical company who changes careers to become a human resources manager. It may or may not be with the same company, but they remain within the pharmaceutical industry. In this case, they are leaving one set of skills behind (accounting) to develop a new set (human resource) within the same industry.

          In a functional career change, new or additional training as well as certifications may be required in order to make the switch. If you are considering a functional career change, you can start by getting any training or certifications needed either online, through trade associations or at your local community college.

          Double Career Change

          This is the most challenging career change of all. A person doing a double career change is switching both a career and an industry.

          An example of a double change would be an airline pilot quitting to pursue their dream of producing rock music. In that case, they are leaving both the aviation industry and a specific skill set (piloting) for a completely unrelated industry and career.

          When considering a double career change, start preparing by getting any needed training or certifications first. Then you can get your foot in the door by taking an apprenticeship or part time job.

          With a double change, it’s not uncommon to have to start out at the bottom as you are asking an employer to take a chance on someone without any experience or work history in the industry.

          Entrepreneurial Career Change

          Probably one of the most common career changes made by people in their 50’s is the entrepreneurial career change.

          After 20 to 30 years of working for “Corporate America”, a lot of people become disillusioned with the monotony, politics and inefficiency of the corporate world. Many of us dream of having our own business and being our own boss.

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          By this time in our life, we have saved some money and the financial pressures we had with young children have passed; so it’s a perfect time to spread our entrepreneurial wings.

          Entrepreneurial career changes can be within the same industry and using your existing knowledge and contacts to start a similar business competing within the same industry. Or it can be completely unrelated to your former industry and based on personal interests, passions or hobbies.

          A good example would be someone who played golf as a hobby starting an affiliate marketing website selling golf clubs. If you are considering an entrepreneurial career change, there are a lot of very good free resources available on the internet. Just be sure to do your homework.

          Practical Tips on Making a Career Change at 50+

          So you’ve decided to take the plunge and make a career switch in your 50’s. No matter what your reasons or what type of a career change you are embarking on, here are some helpful hints to make the transition easier:

          1. Deal with the Fear

          As stated earlier, any big life change comes with both fear and anxiety. Things never seem to go as smoothly as planned, you will always have bumps and roadblocks along the way. By recognizing this and even planning for it, you are less likely to let these issues derail your progress.

          If you find yourself becoming discouraged by all of the stumbling blocks, there are always resources to help. Contacting a career coach is a good place to start, they can help you with an overall strategy for your career change as well as the interview and hiring process, resume writing / updating and more. Just Google “Career Coach” for your options.

          I also recommend using the services of a professional counselor or therapist to help deal with the stress and anxiety of this major life event.

          It’s always good to have an unbiased third party to help you work through the problems that inevitably arise.

          2. Know Your “Why”

          It’s important that you have a clear understanding of the “why” you are making this career change. Is it to have more free time, reduce stress, follow a passion or be your own boss?

          Having a clear understanding of you personal “why” will influence every decision in this process. Knowing your “why” and keeping it in mind also serves as a motivator to help you reach your goals.

          3. Be Realistic

          Take an inventory of both your strengths and weaknesses. Are your organizational skills less than stellar? Then, becoming a wedding planner is probably not a good idea.

          This is an area where having honest outside input can be really helpful. Most of us are not very good at accurately assessing our abilities. It’s a universal human trait to exaggerate our abilities while diminishing our weaknesses.

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          Requesting honest feedback from friends and co-workers is a good place to start, but this is another area where a career coach can come in handy.

          4. Consider an Ad-Vocation

          Sometimes, making a career change all at once is just too big of a change. Issues like a severely reduced income, geography and lack of benefits can all be impediments to your career change. In those cases, you may want to start your new career as an ad-vocation.

          An ad-vocation is a second or ad-on vocation in addition to your primary vocation. Things like a part-time job, consulting or even a side business can all be ad-vocations.

          The benefit of having an ad-vocation is being able to build experience a reputation and contacts in the new field while maintaining all the benefits of your current job.

          5. Update Your Skills

          Whether it means acquiring new certifications or going back to school to get your cosmetology licence, having the right training is the foundation for a successful career change.

          The great thing about changing careers now is that almost any training or certifications needed can be free or at very little cost online. Check with trade associations, industry websites and discussion groups for any requirements you may need.

          Learn How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive.

          6. Start Re-Branding Yourself Now

          Use the internet and social media to change the way you present yourself online.

          Changing your LinkedIn profile is a good way to show prospective employers that you are serious about a career change.

          Joining Facebook groups, trade associations and discussion boards as well as attending conventions is a great way to start building a network while you learn.

          Here’re some Personal Branding Basics You Need to Know for Career Success.

          7. Overhaul Your Resume

          Most of us have heard the advice to update our resume every six months, and most of us promptly ignore that advice and only update our resume when we need it.

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          When making a career change, updating is not enough; this calls for a complete overhaul of your resume. Chances are that your current resume was designed around your old career which may or may not apply to your new goals.

          Crafting a new resume emphasizing your strengths for the new position your looking for is key. There are many places that will help you craft a resume online and it is a service included with most career coaching services.

          8. Know Your Timeline

          There are a lot of factors when it comes to how long it will take to make the career change.

          Industry and Functional career changes tend to be the easiest to do and therefore can be accomplished in the shortest period of time. While the Double Career Change and the Entrepreneurial Career Change both require more effort and thus time.

          There are also personal factors involved in the time it will take to switch careers.

          Generally speaking the more you are willing to be flexible with both compensation and geography, the shorter time it will take to make the switch.

          Final Thoughts

          Changing careers at anytime can be stressful, but for those of us who are 50 or above, it can seem to be an overwhelming task fraught with pitfalls and self doubt.

          Prospective employers know the benefits that come with more mature employees. Things like a wealth of experience, a proven work history and deeper understanding of corporate culture are all things that older workers bring to the table.

          And while the younger generation may possess better computer or technical skills than us, if you’re willing to learn, there are a ton of free or nearly free resources available to you.

          Deciding on a career change at 50 is a great way to experience life on your own terms.

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          Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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