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People Should Know About These Important Internet Rules Which Most of Us Are Simply Unaware Of

People Should Know About These Important Internet Rules Which Most of Us Are Simply Unaware Of

The Internet is a worldwide web of people and information; it can be difficult to navigate, so you need to know the basics. It may not seem like it from the outside, but through all the sharing, trolling, and seemingly temporary conversations, there are certain rules for using the Internet. Consider this your Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Interwebz.

Wherever I am, it's at least 1000 billboards shy of Times Square...

    Wherever I am, it’s at least 1000 billboards shy of Times Square…

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    1. We’re All Judging You.

    Nobody likes to be judged, but the truth is, we’re all judging everyone. Part of growing up is realizing, understanding, and accepting that not only is everyone judging books by their covers, it’s actually what covers are designed for. Every profile, picture, or comment you post says something about who you are, whether you realize it or not. Even the metadata collectively builds a picture of you; how do you think your bank knows when there’s unusual spending on your account?

    2. Your Security Is Your Problem.

    You know how there are signs in every parking garage saying they’re not responsible for lost or stolen items in your vehicle? The Internet works the same way. Social media sites, email providers, online retail—they all do what they can to protect themselves and you (in that order) from security breaches, but it’s ultimately up to you. I can build Ft. Knox, but if you keep giving out the key, the gold isn’t all that safe.

    3. Porn and Pirates Exist.

    You’ll never clean up the Internet, and it’s not even worth trying. In trying to suppress the Internet, you’re trying to suppress people’s imaginations. That’ll never fly—individuals may be subdued, but you’ll never quell the collective mindset of the Internet. The more oppressed we are on the outside, the more we’ll rage online. People love porn and piracy; traffic statistics routinely prove this. Stop fighting it and work with it.

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    4. You’re Speaking in a Public Forum.

    Everything you post online is equivalent to posting it on the front page of the newspaper and delivering it to everyone around you. Some people may agree, and some may disagree. You may even strike a chord with enough people to spark a movement. You can’t control what people do with your message, but you can control your message. Only say online what you’re willing to say in front of your grandma.

    5. It’s Not Just What You Post, but Where.

    The content of your posts matters, but so does where you’re posting. The audience of a particular website may not agree with your particular message (or at least with the way you’re presenting it), so be careful what you post where. Disquss and Facebook are pretty universally used as identification when posting online, and many community-oriented sites, such as The Huffington Post, are moving toward identifying commenters to keep things civil.

    6. Whether You Agree or Not, Majority Rules.

    Take PR exec Justine Sacco for example. Late last year, this woman tweeted a joke on her way to Africa, and by the time she landed, she was fired. I don’t agree with her termination, and I’m sure she doesn’t either, but our opinions don’t matter, because the majority spoke. The Internet is as close to a true democracy as we have in this world, so, for good or bad, the majority rules.

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    7. Toughen Your Skin.

    There are some really mean people out there saying and doing some really mean things. It’s good to fight for justice. You should speak out when you see something wrong, but it’s not realistic to think the world will instantly change. Life’s not fair for anyone, so it’s fair in that sense. Thicken your skin and learn to take criticism because people would much rather learn and debate knowledge than argue and fight about morality.

    8. Big Brothers Are Watching.

    You’re being monitored. Everyone is monitoring you. This is not a test, and it’s not some marketing ploy (although the marketing industry is involved in monitoring you). Understand you’re not just being judged by your peers—you’re being judged by the powers that be. It’s not just in the US either; everyone’s trying to pry into your private life.

    9. Keep It Civil.

    Freedom of speech is important—everyone should have the right to say what they want, and a few idiots who abuse this freedom can’t ruin it for anyone. You can say whatever you want. This doesn’t mean there aren’t consequences to your words; however, so proceed with caution. From your end, put forth the effort to be courteous and considerate of people you interact with, whether online or off.

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    10. You Should Be Anonymous.

    Anonymous sounds like some crazy hacker group filled with rowdy kids, but it’s not. Anonymous is an ideal supported by grown and successful adults and innovators in every industry. The reason we all support Anonymous is because we believe every human being deserves the basic human right of choosing the size of their own personal bubble. You should be Anonymous too.

    All photos courtesy of Frost the Great

    Featured photo credit: esafety via esafety.ie

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    Last Updated on February 15, 2019

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

    Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

    Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

    So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

    Joe’s Goals

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      Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

      Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

      Daytum

        Daytum

        is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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        Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

        Excel or Numbers

          If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

          What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

          Evernote

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            I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

            Evernote is free with a premium version available.

            Access or Bento

              If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

              Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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              You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

              Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

              All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

              Conclusion

              I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

              What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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