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The Real Problem with Email

The Real Problem with Email


    Over the past week there have been a slew of articles on email, especially considering we are coming up on the 30th anniversary of email. What is often being discussed is the problems that email has created (as well as the problems email has solved), but there has been more talk about how we must work to “tame” email in order to fix the problems that it creates.

    But the problem isn’t email. Email doesn’t need to be tamed. The problem, quite simply, is how we treat email.

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    Individuals and companies treat email in ways that go against the grain of what email should be used for: to communicate in long form without using the phone. It’s not a replacement for the phone, it’s not a means to get in touch with someone immediately. Yet the expectation is that it is – or should be.

    People seem to think that since you receive the email almost instantly that you should reply in kind. But for most people (there are some jobs where the work is email management) managing email is an aspect of their job – and a small one at that. Yet it is almost one of the first things we mention that we do during our day.

    Think about this: do you wait for the postal worker for all hours, opening and closing the door to check the mail nonstop every day? Of course you don’t. That would be a waste of time and energy. You know when the postal worker arrives (approximately), so if you’re expecting something then you have a general idea of when it will arrive. Because of that, you don’t sit by the door all day waiting. You go about your day, doing the actual work you have on tap rather than let the possibility of an important delivery get in your way.

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    Do you do the same thing with email? Likely not.

    Instead, you keep your email application open, waiting for that imminent notification alert to come so you cna check and see what new thing just got delivered to your inbox.

    Perhaps you don’t do this. Perhaps you check email 2–3 times per day, and that’s it. Perhaps you treat email in a way that it allows you to treat your other work better.

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    Perhaps.

    Do you manage your tasks from your email application? Unless you’re using something like ActiveInbox or a similar add-on, then you are using a communication tool as a task management tool. And that doesn’t work.

    Do you put Post-It Notes directly (and exclusively) on your phone to remind you of to do items? You may do this for items that require using the phone, but beyond that I highly doubt it. Yet we do this with email applications without even thinking about it in the same way.

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    The barrier to using a task management application is often because people “feel” or “think” they can use their email application to manage their tasks with folders and the like. You can try, but you won’t be nearly as effective or efficient. I challenge you to use a separate piece of software (or, if you’re using Outlook, use the To Do component) to manage your tasks rather than using your email application to manage your tasks. Stick with it through the initial adjustment, and I bet you’ll see your workflow improve.

    So what’s the bottom line?

    No matter what email app or service you use, unless you put the discipline and boundaries in place when it comes to using this valuable communication tool, you’re doing it wrong.

    So what’s the email problem? It’s not the technology; it’s the people using the technology. And until we fix that email will always appear…broken.

    (Photo credit: A Lot of At Signs via Shutterstock)

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    Mike Vardy

    A productivity specialist who shows you how to define your day, funnel your focus, and make every moment matter.

    Get What Matters Done by Scheduling Time Blocks What Everyone Is Wrong About Achieving Inbox Zero 4 Simple Steps to Brain Dump for a Smarter Brain Why Is Productivity Important? 10 Reasons to Become More Productive How to Use a Calendar to Create Time and Space

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    Last Updated on November 5, 2019

    5 Best Language Learning Apps to Master a New Language

    5 Best Language Learning Apps to Master a New Language

    Learning a new language is no easy feat. While a language instructor is irreplaceable, language learning apps have come to revolutionize a lot of things and it has made language learning much easier. Compared to language learning websites, apps offer a more interactive experience to learn a new language.

    The following language learning apps are the top recommended apps for your language learning needs:

    1. Duolingo

      Duolingo is a very successful app that merged gamification and language learning. According to Expanded Ramblings, the app now counts with 300 million users.

      Duolingo offers a unique concept, an easy-to-use app and is a great app to accompany your language acquisition journey. The courses are created by native speakers, so this is not data or algorithm-based.

      The app is free and has the upgrade options with Duolingo Plus for $9.99, which are add free lessons. The mobile app offers 25 languages and is popular for English-speaking learners learning other languages.

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      Download the app

      2. HelloTalk

        HelloTalk aims to facilitate speaking practice and eliminate the stresses of a real-time and life conversation. The app allows users to connect to native speakers and has a WhatsApp like chat that imitates its interface.

        There is a perk to this app. The same native speakers available also want to make an even exchange and learn your target language, so engagement is the name of the game.

        What’s more, the app has integrated translation function that bypasses the difficulties of sending a message with a missing word and instead fills in the gap.

        Download the app

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        3. Mindsnacks

          Remember that Duolingo has integrated gamification in language learning? Well, Mindsnacks takes the concept to another level. There is an extensive list of languages available within the app comes with eight to nine games designed to learn grammar, vocabulary listening.

          You will also be able to visualize your progress since the app integrates monitoring capabilities. The layout and interface is nothing short of enjoyable, cheerful and charming.

          Download the app

          4. Busuu

            Bussu is a social language learning app. It is available on the web, Android, and iOS. It currently supports 12 languages and is free.

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            The functionality allows users to learn words, simple dialogues and questions related to the conversations. In addition, the dialogues are recorded by native speakers, which brings you close to the language learning experience.

            When you upgrade, you unlock important features including course materials. The subscription is $17 a month.

            Download the app

            5. Babbel

              Babbel is a subscription-based service founded in 2008. According to LinguaLift, it is a paid cousing of Duolingo. The free version comes with 40 classes, and does not require you to invest any money.

              Each of the classes starts with with a sequential teaching of vocabulary with the help of pictures. The courses are tailor made and adapted to the students’ level, allowing the learning to be adjusted accordingly.

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              If you started learning a language and stopped, Babbel will help you pick up where you started.

              Download the app

              Takeaways

              All the apps recommended are tailored for different needs, whether you’re beginning to learn a language or trying to pick back up one. All of them are designed by real-life native speakers and so provide you with a more concrete learning experience.

              Since these apps are designed to adapt to different kinds of learning styles, do check out which one is the most suitable for you.

              More About Language Learning

              Featured photo credit: Yura Fresh via unsplash.com

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