Advertising

How To Back Up Android Devices

Advertising
How To Back Up Android Devices

As technological trends continue to evolve, so too do the ways in which we process, view and store important data. The evolution of the smartphone has had a particularly significant impact, as contemporary Android devices have the capacity to perform a widening range of everyday and real-time tasks.

This rapid evolution can pose an issue for users, however, who often find it difficult to keep pace and utilize their devices effectively. When you consider this alongside the fact that worldwide mobile phone sales totaled 435 million units in the second quarter of 2013 alone, it is clear that a growing number of individuals are being challenged in terms of their technological literacy and awareness.

Advertising

One of the main issues facing Android users is data management, as there are numerous methods that can be used to back up Android devices and protect sensitive data. Not all of these are effective, however, while there is also a danger that you will place this information at risk if you do not follow the steps correctly. The key to backing up data is to pay attention to detail.

Back Up Android Devices Using a Personal Computer or SD Card

While Android devices come with a predetermined amount of internal memory, you also have the option of purchasing an additional SD Card with up to 32GB of space. Using this, or the SD Card that comes with your personal computer, represents an ideal way of safely backing up data in a secure manner. Consider the following method of keeping your pictures, numbers and contact details safe, following these specific steps:

Advertising

  • Connect your Android Device to a personal computer using a USB cable.

Connect Android to PC
    • On your Android device, select the pull down main menu and select ‘USB connection’.

    Advertising

    Android
      • Scroll across to the next page and select USB Mass Storage before hitting ‘OK’.

      USB
        • Your computer will now show a ‘Removable Disk’ icon on the desktop.
        • Open this and copy all of your Android files to a new file location on your computer.

        Advertising

        Disk
          • Give this file a suitable date and title before committing this to memory.

          Alternative Back-up Methods: The Mobile Application

          Arguably, the key to successfully backing up your Android data lies with creating multiple files. While you have already backed up your information to a personal computer, for example, it is wise to create an additional storage file that can be readily accessed. More specifically, you should consider backing up your data to a real-time application that automatically updates regularly, which enables you to easily save your recent texts, images and core user settings. Although this is not as reliable as saving your data to a personal computer, it is secure enough when considered as a secondary option.

          As you can synchronize your app to an Android device and automatically update your backup data, this method essentially eliminates the time-consuming elements of managing your contacts, information and correspondence. The key is to select a viable app from the existing selection, bearing in mind that some are not free and may require you to enter credit card information and personal details. Here are some of the most affordable and effective apps that you should consider:

          Advertising

          • Helium Premium: With a one-off cost of $4.99, Helium Premium offers value for money for both root and non-root Android users. It is essentially a cloud-based synchronization and storage service, which allows for scheduled backups and offers users access to Google Drive and Dropbox.
          • MyBackup Pro: Another app that works with both root and non-root devices, MyBackup Pro is ideal for users with a great deal of personal and professional data on their Android devices. This can also be downloaded for $4.99 and delivers excellent value for money.
          • G Cloud Backup: For those of you with less pressing back up needs, G Cloud Backup provides a free-to-download resource with 1GB of storage space. It also has the capacity to back up multiple Android devices simultaneously, while also keeping this data within a single and easily accessible file. If necessary, additional storage space can be purchased separately.

          The Bottom Line

          By creating two independent backups of your Android data, it is possible to protect the integrity of your personal information without consuming too much of your time. This can also be done in an easy-to-manage and affordable manner, especially when you utilize complimentary SD storage cards and cost-effective mobile applications.

          More by this author

          The One Strategy to Achieve Your Goals With Minimal Effort 6 Ways To Wake Up Early Without Feeling Tired 10 Reasons A Long-Distance Relationship Will Work 12 iPhone 6 Tricks You Probably Don’t Know But Should We Are Often Confused Empathy With Sympathy but What’s The Difference Actually?

          Trending in Technology

          1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

          Read Next

          Advertising
          Advertising

          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          Advertising
          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

            What Does Private Browsing Do?

            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

            Advertising

            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

            The Terminal Archive

            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

            Advertising

            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

            Clearing Your Tracks

            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

            Advertising

            dscacheutil -flushcache

            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

            Advertising

            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

            Read Next