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How To Back Up Android Devices

How To Back Up Android Devices

As technological trends continue to evolve, so too do the ways in which we process, view and store important data. The evolution of the smartphone has had a particularly significant impact, as contemporary Android devices have the capacity to perform a widening range of everyday and real-time tasks.

This rapid evolution can pose an issue for users, however, who often find it difficult to keep pace and utilize their devices effectively. When you consider this alongside the fact that worldwide mobile phone sales totaled 435 million units in the second quarter of 2013 alone, it is clear that a growing number of individuals are being challenged in terms of their technological literacy and awareness.

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One of the main issues facing Android users is data management, as there are numerous methods that can be used to back up Android devices and protect sensitive data. Not all of these are effective, however, while there is also a danger that you will place this information at risk if you do not follow the steps correctly. The key to backing up data is to pay attention to detail.

Back Up Android Devices Using a Personal Computer or SD Card

While Android devices come with a predetermined amount of internal memory, you also have the option of purchasing an additional SD Card with up to 32GB of space. Using this, or the SD Card that comes with your personal computer, represents an ideal way of safely backing up data in a secure manner. Consider the following method of keeping your pictures, numbers and contact details safe, following these specific steps:

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  • Connect your Android Device to a personal computer using a USB cable.

Connect Android to PC
    • On your Android device, select the pull down main menu and select ‘USB connection’.

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    Android
      • Scroll across to the next page and select USB Mass Storage before hitting ‘OK’.

      USB
        • Your computer will now show a ‘Removable Disk’ icon on the desktop.
        • Open this and copy all of your Android files to a new file location on your computer.

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        Disk
          • Give this file a suitable date and title before committing this to memory.

          Alternative Back-up Methods: The Mobile Application

          Arguably, the key to successfully backing up your Android data lies with creating multiple files. While you have already backed up your information to a personal computer, for example, it is wise to create an additional storage file that can be readily accessed. More specifically, you should consider backing up your data to a real-time application that automatically updates regularly, which enables you to easily save your recent texts, images and core user settings. Although this is not as reliable as saving your data to a personal computer, it is secure enough when considered as a secondary option.

          As you can synchronize your app to an Android device and automatically update your backup data, this method essentially eliminates the time-consuming elements of managing your contacts, information and correspondence. The key is to select a viable app from the existing selection, bearing in mind that some are not free and may require you to enter credit card information and personal details. Here are some of the most affordable and effective apps that you should consider:

          • Helium Premium: With a one-off cost of $4.99, Helium Premium offers value for money for both root and non-root Android users. It is essentially a cloud-based synchronization and storage service, which allows for scheduled backups and offers users access to Google Drive and Dropbox.
          • MyBackup Pro: Another app that works with both root and non-root devices, MyBackup Pro is ideal for users with a great deal of personal and professional data on their Android devices. This can also be downloaded for $4.99 and delivers excellent value for money.
          • G Cloud Backup: For those of you with less pressing back up needs, G Cloud Backup provides a free-to-download resource with 1GB of storage space. It also has the capacity to back up multiple Android devices simultaneously, while also keeping this data within a single and easily accessible file. If necessary, additional storage space can be purchased separately.

          The Bottom Line

          By creating two independent backups of your Android data, it is possible to protect the integrity of your personal information without consuming too much of your time. This can also be done in an easy-to-manage and affordable manner, especially when you utilize complimentary SD storage cards and cost-effective mobile applications.

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          Last Updated on May 14, 2019

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

          1. Zoho Notebook
            If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
          2. Evernote
            The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
          3. Net Notes
            If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
          4. i-Lighter
            You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
          5. Clipmarks
            For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
          6. UberNote
            If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
          7. iLeonardo
            iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
          8. Zotero
            Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

          I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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          In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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