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15 Apps That Let You Join the Sharing Economy

15 Apps That Let You Join the Sharing Economy

The rise of the “sharing economy” has created a budding and earnest group of micro-business owners. These mini-preneurs are your Airbnb hosts, your TaskRabbits, and your Uber drivers.

As this new frontier of peer-to-peer commerce grows, so does the list of apps that can help you take advantage of it. Here are 15 you should be aware of because they can save you time and money, or even help you make a few bucks of your own.

1. Sidecar

While Sidecar isn’t as well known as its well-funded ridesharing competition, it holds a distinction that neither Uber nor Lyft can claim: Winner of The Wall Street Journal’s 2014 review of transportation apps.

Download the Sidecar app and enter your preferences for car type, driver, fare, and ETA. You’ll pay less than you would for a cab and you have the advantage of knowing the price up front—something that’s always a bit of a mystery when you hop into a cab or even when you hail a ride on Lyft or Uber.

Background checks are required for all drivers and the company carries a $1 million liability policy in case there’s any trouble.

sidecar_screenshot0
     

    2. Yerdle 

    Yerdle is a peer-to-peer second-hand store with a unique credit system for goods changing hands. You’ll find everything from toys and electronics to tools and camping gear.

    Get items for free using Yerdle credits (currently Yerdle is giving people 250 credits for signing up), and earn more credits by giving away items you no longer want or need.

    Local pick-up is free or you can have items shipped across the US. 

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    Yerdle

      3. JustPark 

      JustPark (formerly ParkAtMyHouse) aims to solve the problem of finding a parking space, circling the block, feeding the meter, worrying about moving your car, or paying too much for a parking space. It does this by leveraging vacant privately-owned parking spaces in your city. 

      Spaces are available at rates varying by demand from anywhere from half an hour up to six months, and JustPark says the spots in their network average 60% less than street parking.

      JustPark

        4. Vayable

        With Vayable, you can book a tour with a local expert in cities around the world. And on the flip-side, if you have a unique perspective to share about your city, you can sign up as a host and earn money showing people a fun local experience they wouldn’t get from an “official” tour guide.

        Vayable

          5. DogVacay 

          Think Airbnb, but for dogs. DogVacay (and rival Rover) connects pet-owners with pet-sitters, avoiding the need to visit a traditional kennel or dog-boarding service. All prospective hosts go through an application process that includes reference checks and phone interviews.

          Dog lovers can open their home to visiting pets and earn boarding fees ranging from $15 to $50 a night.

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          DogVacay on the App Store on iTunes

            6. Spinlister 

            Spinlister is the peer-to-peer marketplace for sports equipment rentals, like skis and snowboards, bikes, or surfboards.

            (The common theme? Stuff you can ride.)

            Since those items are generally expensive but in use only occasionally, it makes sense to rent instead of buy—or earn some money from the gear you already have instead of letting it collect dust in the garage.

            Spinlister

              7. LeftoverSwap

              OK, maybe this whole sharing economy is going a little too far! LeftoverSwap aims to reduce food waste by connecting hungry neighbors with their overstuffed counterparts. Perhaps it will promote some new culinary adventures.

              LeftoverSwap

                8. HomeDine

                Instead of eating out in some boring restaurant while you’re traveling, fire up the HomeDine app and see what’s cooking. The premise is to join in on a home-cooked meal anywhere in the world, meet new people, and share a unique cultural experience.

                Homedine

                  9. Getaround

                  Getaround puts your car to use for you when you’re not driving it, or allows you to rent a car from someone in the Getaround network. You can set your desired rates and the company handles all the payment processing and insurance. 

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                  On the customer side, you may be able to find a cheaper car rental by not going through a traditional agency like Hertz, or you can use the service to test drive a car you’ve always wanted.

                  getaround

                    10. Zaarly 

                    Zaarly allows users to create their own micro “stores” to sell goods or services to their peers. You’ll find everything from handyman services, iPhone repairs, even homemade apple pies.

                    While much of the network is local or hands-on, some providers are offering “virtual” services like phone consultations or online work.

                    Zaarly  Hire the best home service experts on the App Store on iTunes

                      11. Lending Club 

                      Next time you’re in need of cash, don’t run to the bank for a loan; instead try Lending Club. Borrowers will find rates as a low as 6%, while lenders can invest in fractional ownership of a portfolio of peer-to-peer notes, and earn higher returns than savings accounts or CDs.

                      Lending Club

                        12. Fon 

                        Fon asks you to allow others to access your home WiFi network in exchange for getting free WiFi at any of the 8 million worldwide hotspots in Fon’s network. 

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                        fon

                          13. Poshmark

                          Poshmark helps women monetize their closet and declutter at the same time. You can list gently used clothing items for sale in less than 60 seconds with their app, and also shop for new or pre-worn items at prices up to 70% off retail. 

                          Poshmark

                            14. Postmates

                            Postmates aims to “revolutionize urban logistics” by changing how local goods are acquired, delivered, and consumed. Employing an army of on-demand couriers (primarily on bikes, but sometimes in cars), the company promises quick, low cost delivery of any local item.

                            And of course if you know your city inside and out and would love to be the next bike messenger hero, Postmates could be a money-making opportunity for you.

                            Postmates

                              15. Instacart

                              The problem with groceries is you often have to go to the store to get them, which can be time-consuming. Instacart is the personal grocery shopping service that will deliver your grocery order to your door for a nominal fee.

                              I thought the delivery fees were actually pretty attractive, starting at $3.99 when you order $35 or more, but the company also marks up the cost of the actual food as well.

                              instacart

                                Featured photo credit: Vayable via gigaom.com

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                                1 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 2 7 Clever Goal Tracker Apps to Make the Most of Your Business in 2019 3 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance 4 18 Best Time Management Apps and Tools (2019 Updated) 5 16 Less Known Gmail Hacks That Will Super Boost Your Productivity

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                                Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                                7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                                7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                                Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                                Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                                Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                                So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                                Joe’s Goals

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                                  Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                                  Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                                  Daytum

                                    Daytum

                                    is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                                    Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                                    Excel or Numbers

                                      If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                                      What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                                      Evernote

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                                        I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                                        Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                                        Access or Bento

                                          If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                                          Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                                          You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                                          Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                                          All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                                          Conclusion

                                          I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                                          What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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