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10 Great iPhone Apps To Remotely Control Your PC or Mac

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10 Great iPhone Apps To Remotely Control Your PC or Mac

The iPhone device is undoubtedly a very powerful Smartphone in the global mobile market today. It supports powerful features including applications that allow you to control your personal computer or Mac remotely using your iPhone. Don’t miss out using any of these great applications that will allow you to remotely control your Mac or any PC using your iPhone device.

1. Keymote

This iPhone app is exclusively designed to remotely control your Mac computer. It has specific key sets that allow you to perform specific actions on your Mac. It has an easy to use interface, and you have numerous key sets to choose from in its built-in Keymote store. These key sets are shortcuts that will make it easier to control your Mac using your iPhone.

Keymote
    Keymote1

      2. Remote HD

      This iPhone app works in controlling your Mac computer, Apple TV, and other computers remotely using your device. Its strong and unique feature is that it works as more than just a remote control application as it is also a fully functional Virtual Network Computing (VNC) app. You can view your computer desktop and interact with its elements. Remote HD can also connect using GPRS or 3G, thereby allowing you to connect and control your Mac or PC even you are outdoors.

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      Remote HD

        3. Remote Tap 5

        This iPhone application comes with a VNC feature that allows you to access your computer desktop and to show multiple displays. It has a magnifying glass feature in 4x zoom view. The app will also instantly launch or hide your desktop apps in just a click of your phone.

        Remote Tap 5-1
          Remote Tap 5

            4. Mobile Mouse Pro

            This application allows you to control your PC or Mac as a track pad and air mouse across your room. It is a universal app that you can use in controlling Windows, Linux, and Mac computers. It works through a WiFi connection that will not interfere with your accessibility to your computers.

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            Mobile Mouse Pro

              5. WiFiRemote

              This is an 8-in-1 remote control app for your iPod or iPhone that allows you to control your Mac and PCs using your mobile device. The app automatically searches for the computer’s IP address and uses the WiFi network for controlling your computers. It has the key features of a mouse, keyboard, touch pad, text pad, and application launch pad, plus configurable keys to define your own shortcuts for most commonly used features.

              WiFiRemote
                WiFiRemote1

                  6. iTeleport

                  This is a top selling app for iPhone that allows you to control your Mac or PC through a WiFi connection or on 3G. You can manage your desktop applications directly from your iPhone, and it comes with a full retina support display on iPhone 4 models and higher.

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                  iTeleport

                    7. Screens VNC

                    This VNC-optimized mobile app for your iPhone allows you to control your PC and Mac computers with the ability to synchronize your desktop apps on iCloud. You can connect to your computers securely using the SSH Tunnel to encrypt your connection. This is one of the best iPhone apps to remotely control your Mac and PC, giving you a smooth multi-touch experience.

                    Screens VNC

                      8. Jump Desktop

                      This is a remote desktop control that automatically configures with your Mac or PC for remote access through the connection of WiFi or 3G. You can even print directly on an Air Print compatible printer. The app also supports multiple gestures where you can write or draw using your finger.

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                      Jump Desktop

                        9. Ignition

                        This app gives you access to your desktop applications and files from your computer.  You can also attach files and applications to your computer. It is also compatible with Air Print to allow you to directly print your computer files. The app also has a cloud feature that is linked to your Ignition account to backup your computer files.

                        Ignition
                          Ignition1

                            10. PocketCloud Remote Desktop

                            This free app allows you to get an instant access to your Windows or Mac computers. It has an advanced accuracy Touch Pointer for the instant use of the app’s keyboard and mouse control. You can also customize your function keys with shortcuts to control your computers more conveniently.

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                            PocketCloud Remote Desktop

                              All of these iPhone apps mentioned above are reliable and helpful for controlling your PC or Mac, and even some other devices. If you knew some great iPhone applications, just make a comment below.

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                              Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                              There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                              Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                                What Does Private Browsing Do?

                                When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                                For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                                The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                                The Terminal Archive

                                While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                                Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                                dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                                Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                                Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                                However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                                Clearing Your Tracks

                                Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                                dscacheutil -flushcache

                                As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                                Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                                Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                                If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                                As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                                Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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