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10 Free Apps Every Language Student Should Have In Their Phones (Android)

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10 Free Apps Every Language Student Should Have In Their Phones (Android)

You are committed to learning a new language? You have a big challenge in front of you! The life-time journey of mastering a foreign language requires great commitment, diligence and practice. Thanks to Android smartphone apps, the process will become much faster and more convenient.

You can learn new words and grammar rules on the bus, while waiting in line, and in any other free moment you get. Below are 10 apps that you should definitely install in your phone.

1. Memrise: Free, Fun, Learning

mem

    This app is the Wikipedia of learning; it contains over 300,000 community-created courses, including lessons on over 180 languages. The “mems” (user-generated definitions, images, explanations and sentences) will help you remember new words and phrases easily through cognitive learning.

    2. NinjaEssays

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    paper writing service

      This is a web-based app that offers various features for free. The blog section provides great tips for language students, and the free citation generator will save you from a lot of work when you write content in the new language and want to reference the sources properly. In addition, the WordCount tool will not only count the exact number of words and characters in your text, but will also enable you to see which words you’ve used too often.

      3. iTranslate

      itra

        The most popular translator app combines voice recognition, machine translation and voice output into an effective system that helps you translate words, phrases and sentences into 50+ different languages. You can send the translated text via email, save it to a list of favorites, or post it on Twitter.

        4. Duolingo: Learn Languages Free

        duolinguo

          This app offers fun, structured, and 100% free lessons in English, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Irish, and Swedish. Duolingo pushes you to progress by completing bite-sized lessons and getting motivated by cool achievements.

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          5. Learn Languages: Rosetta Stone

          learn

            Rosetta Stone is the epitome of online language learning. There are available lessons in Italian, French, Spanish, German, Turkish, Hindi, Arabic, Chinese, English, Dutch, Greek, Hebrew, and several other languages. The app will help you discover new vocabulary and grammar, and learn how to implement the knowledge in casual conversation.

            6. Dictionary – Merriam-Webster

            merriam_webster

              This is the most respected and useful English language dictionary app, which offers voice search, example sentences, audio pronunciations, thesaurus, word of the day, quick definitions, and other features. If you are trying to learn English and improve your vocabulary, then this is a mandatory addition to your list of apps.

              7. Play & Learn Languages

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              play

                This is a flash card app that helps you learn new words through different games. The 8 packs of cards include vegetables, food, animals, fruit, shapes, colors, numbers, and things. The words are presented with images and spoken audio. This is a great app to use if you are a beginner in learning English, French, Russian, Spanish, Danish, Greek, Thai, or another language that’s currently available.

                8. DigiCal Calendar & Widgets

                digi

                  If you want to learn a language effectively, then you need a calendar app in your phone. DigiCal offers an intuitive user interface, built-in location search, and integration with Google. The best part is that it’s translated in 27 languages, so you can start planning your time in the language you are trying to master.

                  9. WordReference.com dictionaries

                  word

                    This is one of the most powerful dictionary translation apps you could possibly find. You can translate English and Spanish to different languages, and have access to English, Spanish and Italian definitions. In addition, you’ll get a Spanish, French and Italian conjugator. The most valuable feature of WordReference.com dictionaries has to be the forum, where you’ll find the answers to your questions before even asking them.

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                    10. AnkiDroid Flashcards

                    SideBySideComparisonAnkiDroid

                      The good old flashcards are as useful as they always were. AnkiDroid is a great app that helps you memorize anything. You can create your own flashcard decks or download free collections for many languages and topics.

                      Now that you know which free apps to use, you’ll be much more motivated to learn new language lessons on a daily basis!

                      Featured photo credit: Shane Global via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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