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10 Best Book Recommendation Sites You Need To Know

10 Best Book Recommendation Sites You Need To Know

Looking for a great summer read? Want to read more on a topic you’re interested in or see what’s new or trending in the book world? There are plenty of places to turn for book recommendations on the internet. Most are simple and free and best of all, they’ll help prevent that feeling of reader’s remorse, when you get home from the bookstore or library, start reading and realize that you’ve just wasted your time and possibly your hard earned money on a lousy book in which you have no interest in reading.

1. Goodreads

Goodreads is more than a book recommendation site; it’s also an online community of book reviews and ratings. Goodreads will make recommendations based on what you’ve already read or what your friends are reading. Goodreads also highlights what’s trending and new releases that are coming out. Build bookshelves, lists, participate in book discussions and sometimes even author Q & A. 

 

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Goodreads

    2. LibraryThing

    LibraryThing has been around for a long time. In fact, they consider themselves the world’s largest book club and it certainly has that kind of feel. Add books to your catalogue and get recommendations based on what you’ve read or select “member recommendations” instead of LibraryThing recommendations to get different alternatives. You can participate in groups and discussions, and see featured authors and new books as well.

    library thing

      3. What Should I Read Next

      One of the best things about What Should I Read Next is that you don’t need an account to sign in. You just type in a book you like or that you’ve read, and it populates a list of similar books. There are links to the Amazon page for each book. If you choose to sign up for an account, you can make lists of books you’ve read or favorites for the site to base recommendations on. This site is streamlined and easy.

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      Whatshouldireadnext

        4. Bookish

        Bookish has one of the most attractive of the platforms. You can get custom book recommendations by entering a few books you’ve read or browse through different genres. There are articles and author interviews, book lists and reviews. You can also create your own bookshelves.

        Bookish

          5. Shelfari

          Shelfari is a social cataloging website for books, sort of like Wikipedia for books! Shelfari users can build virtual bookshelves of titles have read, and can rate, review, tag, and discuss their books. Users can also create or join groups and discussions. Where Shelfari really shines is in its book listings, detailed summaries, character listings, quotes, settings and more. Though Shelfari is owned by amazon, it is a completely separate website.

          Shelfari

            6. Amazon

            And speaking of Amazon, if you search for a book you’ve read or heard about, the “Customers who bought this item also bought,” section can offer some great title suggestions. The recommendations may be limited, but on the plus side, there are editorial reviews, customer reviews, and sampling. You can also view lists and search by genre.

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            Amazon

              7. BookBub

              BookBub

                BookBub is different in that it isn’t precisely a book recommendation service like the others. What BookBub does is recommend free or extremely low-cost books (usually only $.99-$2,) based on your interests and books you’ve read. BookBub sends you an email every day with book deals for that day often under the radar titles that you may have missed.

                8. Olmenta

                If you don’t want to create book lists or shelves or register for accounts, Olmenta might be a simple solution for you. The site will recommend books for you based on general popularity and the curation and preferences of the people behind the site. You can browse genres as well. There are no hoops to jump through, but the recommendations aren’t personalized either. It’s simple and basic, but if you’re just looking for some new book ideas, Olmenta couldn’t be easier.

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                Olmenta

                  9. Whichbook

                  Whichbook is unlike any of the other sites in that it’s not based on what you’ve already read or on a specific genre. Recommendations are based on emotions and elements of the book. There are a series of slider scales, such as Happy-Sad, Gentle-Violent, Short-Long, Expected-Unpredictable, Easy-Demanding, etc. You can also explore lists and authors, or create your own list as well. Whichbook takes a fun and unique approach.

                  Whichbook

                    10. Riffle

                    Riffle is being called the Pinterest of books! Smaller than Goodreads, Riffle is an alternative that definitely has a Pinterest-like feel. You tell Riffle categories you like and enter a few books you’ve read and it provides you with a suggestion of people to follow. If you happen to like the books they list great, if not you can always unfollow them. As you use the site more, you can add more lists to follow and share lists of your own. While it doesn’t offer specific book recommendations, it does allow you to scroll through galleries of reading possibilities.

                    Riffle

                      Featured photo credit: I love to Read via flickr.com

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                      Royale Scuderi

                      A creative strategist, consultant and writer who specializes in cultivating human potential for happiness, health and fulfillment.

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                      Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                      7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                      7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                      Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                      Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                      Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                      So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                      Joe’s Goals

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                        Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                        Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                        Daytum

                          Daytum

                          is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                          Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                          Excel or Numbers

                            If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                            What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                            Evernote

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                              I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                              Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                              Access or Bento

                                If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                                Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                                You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                                Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                                All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                                Conclusion

                                I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                                What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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