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10 Best Book Recommendation Sites You Need To Know

10 Best Book Recommendation Sites You Need To Know

Looking for a great summer read? Want to read more on a topic you’re interested in or see what’s new or trending in the book world? There are plenty of places to turn for book recommendations on the internet. Most are simple and free and best of all, they’ll help prevent that feeling of reader’s remorse, when you get home from the bookstore or library, start reading and realize that you’ve just wasted your time and possibly your hard earned money on a lousy book in which you have no interest in reading.

1. Goodreads

Goodreads is more than a book recommendation site; it’s also an online community of book reviews and ratings. Goodreads will make recommendations based on what you’ve already read or what your friends are reading. Goodreads also highlights what’s trending and new releases that are coming out. Build bookshelves, lists, participate in book discussions and sometimes even author Q & A. 

 

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Goodreads

    2. LibraryThing

    LibraryThing has been around for a long time. In fact, they consider themselves the world’s largest book club and it certainly has that kind of feel. Add books to your catalogue and get recommendations based on what you’ve read or select “member recommendations” instead of LibraryThing recommendations to get different alternatives. You can participate in groups and discussions, and see featured authors and new books as well.

    library thing

      3. What Should I Read Next

      One of the best things about What Should I Read Next is that you don’t need an account to sign in. You just type in a book you like or that you’ve read, and it populates a list of similar books. There are links to the Amazon page for each book. If you choose to sign up for an account, you can make lists of books you’ve read or favorites for the site to base recommendations on. This site is streamlined and easy.

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      Whatshouldireadnext

        4. Bookish

        Bookish has one of the most attractive of the platforms. You can get custom book recommendations by entering a few books you’ve read or browse through different genres. There are articles and author interviews, book lists and reviews. You can also create your own bookshelves.

        Bookish

          5. Shelfari

          Shelfari is a social cataloging website for books, sort of like Wikipedia for books! Shelfari users can build virtual bookshelves of titles have read, and can rate, review, tag, and discuss their books. Users can also create or join groups and discussions. Where Shelfari really shines is in its book listings, detailed summaries, character listings, quotes, settings and more. Though Shelfari is owned by amazon, it is a completely separate website.

          Shelfari

            6. Amazon

            And speaking of Amazon, if you search for a book you’ve read or heard about, the “Customers who bought this item also bought,” section can offer some great title suggestions. The recommendations may be limited, but on the plus side, there are editorial reviews, customer reviews, and sampling. You can also view lists and search by genre.

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            Amazon

              7. BookBub

              BookBub

                BookBub is different in that it isn’t precisely a book recommendation service like the others. What BookBub does is recommend free or extremely low-cost books (usually only $.99-$2,) based on your interests and books you’ve read. BookBub sends you an email every day with book deals for that day often under the radar titles that you may have missed.

                8. Olmenta

                If you don’t want to create book lists or shelves or register for accounts, Olmenta might be a simple solution for you. The site will recommend books for you based on general popularity and the curation and preferences of the people behind the site. You can browse genres as well. There are no hoops to jump through, but the recommendations aren’t personalized either. It’s simple and basic, but if you’re just looking for some new book ideas, Olmenta couldn’t be easier.

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                Olmenta

                  9. Whichbook

                  Whichbook is unlike any of the other sites in that it’s not based on what you’ve already read or on a specific genre. Recommendations are based on emotions and elements of the book. There are a series of slider scales, such as Happy-Sad, Gentle-Violent, Short-Long, Expected-Unpredictable, Easy-Demanding, etc. You can also explore lists and authors, or create your own list as well. Whichbook takes a fun and unique approach.

                  Whichbook

                    10. Riffle

                    Riffle is being called the Pinterest of books! Smaller than Goodreads, Riffle is an alternative that definitely has a Pinterest-like feel. You tell Riffle categories you like and enter a few books you’ve read and it provides you with a suggestion of people to follow. If you happen to like the books they list great, if not you can always unfollow them. As you use the site more, you can add more lists to follow and share lists of your own. While it doesn’t offer specific book recommendations, it does allow you to scroll through galleries of reading possibilities.

                    Riffle

                      Featured photo credit: I love to Read via flickr.com

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                      Royale Scuderi

                      A creative strategist, consultant and writer who specializes in cultivating human potential for happiness, health and fulfillment.

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                      Last Updated on May 14, 2019

                      8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                      8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                      Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

                      1. Zoho Notebook
                        If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
                      2. Evernote
                        The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
                      3. Net Notes
                        If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
                      4. i-Lighter
                        You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
                      5. Clipmarks
                        For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
                      6. UberNote
                        If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
                      7. iLeonardo
                        iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
                      8. Zotero
                        Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

                      I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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                      In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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