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Transform Your Life In One Month: The 30 Best TED Talks Of All Time That Will Inspire You

Transform Your Life In One Month: The 30 Best TED Talks Of All Time That Will Inspire You

To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.” –  Aristotle

Each one of us needs a starting point to better ourselves, a spark of inspiration that lights up passion inside of you.

And as the old saying goes: if you want to be the best, learn from the best.

Here’s a list of the 31 best TED talks of all time, which will open the gates of imagination and creativity and help you become a better person!

1. Pranav Mistry: The thrilling potential of Sixth Sense

Takeaway: The future is already here. Learn how modern technology helps the physical world interact with the world of data.

“What we can do is not important. What we should do is more important.”

2. Tony Robbins: Why we do what we do

Takeaway: Learn the force behind the things you do in your everyday life and how to change your habits.

“The defining factor [for success] is never resources; it’s resourcefulness.”

3. Daniel Kahneman: The riddle of experience vs. memory

Takeaway: Discover why you are irrational and why your memory often misleads you.

“We don’t choose between experiences, we choose between memories of experiences. Even when we think about the future, we don’t think of our future normally as experiences. We think of our future as anticipated memories.”

4. David Gallo: underwater astonishments

Takeaway: There is so much we still don’t know about the planet we live on.

“Today we’ve only explored about 3 percent of what’s out there in the ocean. Already we’ve found the world’s highest mountains, the world’s deepest valleys, underwater lakes, underwater waterfalls …  There’s still 97 percent, and either that 97 percent is empty or is just full of surprises.”

5. Mary Roach: 10 things you didn’t know about an orgasm

Takeaway: Learn 10 baffling and hilarious things about sexual climax.

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“If you can trigger the Lazarus reflex in a dead person, why not the orgasm reflex?”

6. Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness

Takeaway: Having less stuff might actually make us happier.

“We’ve got to cut the extraneous out of our lives, and we’ve got to learn to stem the inflow. We need to think before we buy. Ask ourselves, ‘Is that really going to make me happier? Truly?”

7. Dan Gilbert: Why are we happy?

Takeaway: Learn how to train your mind to be happy.

“Natural happiness is what we get when we get what we wanted, and synthetic happiness is what we make when we don’t get what we wanted. In our society, we have a strong belief that synthetic happiness is of an inferior kind.”

8. Hans Rosling: The best stats you’ve ever seen

Takeaway: Big data helps to debunk myths about the so-called “developing world.”

“I have shown that Swedish top students know statistically significantly less about the world than the chimpanzees.”

9. Susan Cain: The power of introverts

Takeaway: Learn why introverts should be encouraged and celebrated.

“Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosa Parks, Gandhi — all these peopled described themselves as quiet and soft-spoken and even shy. And they all took the spotlight, even though every bone in their bodies was telling them not to.”

10. Keith Barry: Brain magic

Takeaway: Learn how our brains can fool our bodies.

“I’m going to show you all how easy it is to manipulate the human mind once you know how.”

11. David Blaine: How I held my breath for 17 minutes

Takeaway: Great reminder of how important passion and persistence are in our lives.

“As a magician, I think everything is possible. And I think if something is done by one person it can be done by others.”

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12. Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar

Takeaway: Learn one of the most useful skills in your life – how to detect lies.

“A lie has no power whatsoever by its mere utterance; its power emerges when someone else agrees to believe the lie.”

13. Matt Cuts: Try something new for 30 days

Takeaway: You will never know if you like something unless you try it.

“The next 30 days are going to pass whether you like it or not, so why not think about something you have always wanted to try and give it a shot for the next 30 days?”

14. Jill Bolte Taylor: My Stroke of Insight

Takeaway: Incredibly moving journey of a scientist who suffered a stroke and her way back to the normal life.

“I am the life-force power of the universe. I am the life-force power of the 50 trillion beautiful molecular geniuses that make up my form, at one with all that is.”

15. Brené Brown: The Power of Vulnerability

Takeaway: Learn why those who are vulnerable are generally happier and feel more worthy of love.

“Maybe stories are just data with a soul.”

16. Elizabeth Gilbert: Your Elusive Creative Genius

Takeaway: Learn why there is a genius in all of us.

“We’ve completely internalized and accepted collectively this notion that creativity and suffering are somehow inherently linked, and that artistry in the end will always ultimately lead to anguish — are you guys all cool with that idea?”

17. Meg Jay: Why 30 Is Not the New 20

Takeaway: Learn why your twenties are actually a formative period in our lives.

“When you pat a twentysomething on the head and you say, ‘You have 10 extra years to start your life’ … you have robbed that person of his urgency and ambition.”

18. Amy Cuddy: Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are

Takeaway: Learn how you are influenced by your own body language.

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“Don’t fake it till you make it. Fake it till you become it.”

19. Dan Pink: The Puzzle of Motivation

Takeaway: Learn why we need to rethink how we run our businesses and motivate our employees.

“If you want people to perform better, you reward them, right? Bonuses, commissions, their own reality show. Incentivize them. … But that’s not happening here. You’ve got an incentive designed to sharpen thinking and accelerate creativity, and it does just the opposite. It dulls thinking and blocks creativity.”

20. Deb Roy: The Birth of a Word

Takeaway: Learn in detail how children acquire language and what the implications of this process are.

“The true promise is where the numbers and patterns from this data connect and become personal, enabling us to understand and to respond to humanity and the world in ways previously unimaginable”

21. Nilofer Merchant: Got a Meeting? Take a Walk

Takeaway: Learn why our sedentary lives might be deadly to our bodies and minds.

“Walk and talk. … You’ll be surprised at how fresh air drives fresh thinking.”

22. Ken Robinson: Schools Kill Creativity

Takeaway: Learn about the growing importance of creativity in our education system.

“If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.”

23. Elon Musk: The Mind Behind Tesla, SpaceX and SolarCity

Takeaway: Learn about innovative thought processes and the future of energy.

“Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. … Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.”

24. Simon Sinek: How Great Leaders Inspire Action

Takeaway: Learn where the true inspiration really comes from.

“People don’t buy what you do; people buy why you do it.”

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25. Sheryl Sandberg: Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders

Takeaway: Learn why the world needs more women at the top of their professions.

“I believe a world in which half the countries and half the companies were run by women would be a better world.”

26. Andrew Solomon: Love, No Matter What

Takeaway: Learn how diagnosis of an illness can affect identity.

“People … don’t want to be cured or changed or eliminated. They want to be whoever it is that they’ve come to be.”

27. Rita Pierson: Every Kid Needs a Champion

Takeaway: Learn why every child deserves to have someone believe in them completely.

“Every child deserves a champion — an adult who will never give up on them, who understands the power of connection, and insists that they become the best that they can possibly be.”

28. Steve Jobs: How To Live Before You Die

Takeaway: Learn how to pursue your dreams and see the opportunities in life’s obstacles.

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.”

29. Jamie Oliver: Teach every child about food

Takeaway: Learn how our ignorance of food might destroy our lives and the those of our children.

“Your child will live a life ten years younger than you because of the landscape of food that we’ve built around them.”

30. Amanda Palmer: The art of asking

Takeaway: Learn about the powers of trust and relationships.

“I maintain couchsurfing and crowdsurfing are basically the same thing — you’re falling into the audience and you’re trusting each other.”

Featured photo credit: Old Wisdom / Agnes Scholiers (TouTouke) via rgbstock.com

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Last Updated on September 18, 2019

15 Best Organizing Tips For Office Organization and Getting More Done

15 Best Organizing Tips For Office Organization and Getting More Done

You may think that you don’t have time for office organization, but if you really knew how much time that disorganization cost you, you’d reconsider.

Rearranging and moving piles occasionally doesn’t count. Neither does clearing off your desk, if you swipe the mess into a bin, or a desk drawer.

A relatively neat and orderly office space clears the way for higher productivity and less wasted time.

Organizing your office doesn’t have to take days, it can be done a little at a time. In fact, maintaining an organized office is much more effective if you treat it like an on-going project, instead of a massive assault.

So, if you’re ready to get started, the following organizing tips will help you transform your office into an efficient workspace.

1. Purge Your Office

De-clutter, empty, shred, get rid of everything that you don’t need or want. Look around. What haven’t you used in a while?

Take one area at a time. If it doesn’t work, send it out for repair or toss it. If you haven’t used it in months and can’t think of when you’ll actually need it, out it goes. This goes for furniture, equipment, supplies, etc.

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Don’t forget about knick-knacks, plants (real or artificial), and decorations – if they’re covered with dust and make your office look shabby, they’re fair game.

2. Gather and Redistribute

Gather up every item that isn’t where it belongs and put it where it does.

3. Establish Work “Zones”

Decide what type of activity happens in each area of your office. You’ll probably have a main workspace (most likely your desk,) a reference area (filing cabinet, shelves, binders,) and a supply area (closet, shelves or drawers.)

Place the appropriate equipment and supplies are located in the proper area as much as possible.

4. Close Proximity

Position the equipment and supplies that you use most within reach. Things that you rarely use can be stored or put away.

5. Get a Good Labeler

Choose a label maker that’s simple to use. Take the time to label shelves, bins, baskets drawers. Not only will it remind you where things go, but it will also help others who may have a need to find, use, or put away anything in your workspace.

6. Revise Your Filing System

As we move fully into the digital age, the need to store paper files has decreased.

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What can your store digitally? Are you duplicating files? You may be able to eliminate some of the files and folders you’ve used in the past. If you’re storing files on your computer, make sure you are doing regular back-ups.

Here’re some storage ideas for creating a smooth filing system:

  • Create a meeting folder – Put all “items to be discussed” in there along with items that need to be handed off, reports that need to be given, etc. It’ll help you be prepared for meetings and save you stress in the even that a meeting is moved up.
  • Create a WOR folder – So much of our messy papers are things that are on hold until someone else responds or acts. Corral them in a WOR (Waiting on Response) folder. Check it every few days for outstanding actions you may need to follow-up on.
  • Storage boxes – Use inexpensive storage boxes to keep archived files and get them out of your current file space.
  • Magazine boxes – Use magazine boxes or binders to store magazines and catalogs you really want to store. Please make sure you really need them for reference or research, otherwise recycle them, or give away.
  • Reading folder – Designate a file for print articles and documents you want to read that aren’t urgent.
  • Archive files – When a project is complete, put all of the materials together and file them away. Keep your “working folders” for projects in progress.
  • File weekly – Don’t let your filing pile up. Put your papers in a “To File” folder and file everything once a week.

Learn more tips on organizing your files here: How to Organize Your Files for Better Productivity

7. Clear off Your Desk

Remove everything, clean it thoroughly and put back only those items that are essential for daily use.

If you have difficulty declutter stuff, this Declutter Formula will help you throw away stuff without regretting later.

8. Organize your Desktop

Now that you’ve streamlined your desktop, it’s a good idea to organize it.

Use desktop organizers or containers to organize the items on your desk. Use trays for papers, containers for smaller items.

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Don’t forget your computer desktop! Make sure the files or images are all in organized folders. I’d recommend you clear your computer desktop everyday before you leave work.

9. Organize Your Drawers

Put items used together in the same drawer space, stamps with envelopes, sticky pads with notepads, etc.

Use drawer organizers for little items – paper clips, tacks, etc. Use a separate drawer for personal items.

10. Separate Inboxes

If you work regularly with other people, create a folder, tray, or inbox for each.

11. Clear Your Piles

Hopefully with your new organized office, you won’t create piles of paper anymore, but you still have to sort through the old ones.

Go through the pile (a little at a time if necessary) and put it in the appropriate place or dump it.

12. Sort Mails

Don’t just stick mail in a pile to be sorted or rifle through and take out the pieces you need right now. Sort it as soon as you get it – To act, To read, To file, To delegate or hand off. .

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13. Assign Discard Dates

You don’t need to keep every piece of paper indefinitely. Mark on files or documents when they can be tossed or shredded.

Some legal or financial documents must be kept for specified length of time. Make sure you know what those requirements are.

14. Filter Your Emails

Some emails are important to read, others are just not that important.

When you use the filter system to label different types of emails, you know their priority and which to reply first.

Take a look at these tips to achieve inbox zero: The Ultimate Way to get to Inbox Zero

15. Straighten Your Desk

At the end of the day, do a quick straighten, so you have a clean start the next day.

Bottom Line

Use one tip or try them all. The amount of effort you put into creating and maintaining an efficient work area will pay off in a big way.

Instead of spending time looking for things and shuffling piles, you’ll be able to spend your time…well…working and you’ll enjoy being clutter free!

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Featured photo credit: Alesia Kazantceva via unsplash.com

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