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This “Railway Map” Will Tell You How To Think Like An Entrepreneur

This “Railway Map” Will Tell You How To Think Like An Entrepreneur

getting-on-the-entrepreneur-line-of-thinking-infographic

    Are you a current or aspiring entrepreneur?

    Well, if so, you may just need to unlearn what they taught you in school, especially business school.

    How ironic, yes I know.

    In case you hadn’t noticed, most schools prepare their students to become employees, not entrepreneurs.

    Yes, even the business schools with MBA programs.

    Students are taught to follow the rules, not make mistakes, and that working is a necessity.

    Simply.  Not.  True.

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    The Mind Subway Map is actually a great illustration of what it mentally takes to succeed as an entrepreneur and how they think differently than the rest.

    Below, I highlight a few examples from each of the four different “mentality routes.”  

    What to Unlearn From School.

    Follow the rules.

    If we all followed the rules we would cease creating anything new.

    Money is Evil.

    No. The lack of money is evil.

    Behave yourself.

    Entrepreneurs challenge the status quo and aren’t afraid to make mistakes.  This doesn’t align with the discipline they enforce in school.  

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    What to Never Think.

    I don’t know enough.

    The trick is surrounding yourself with people who know what you don’t.  Build a team of various experts.  You will never know it all, and if you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in trouble.

    What if I fail?

    This one really irks me.  Too many people are scared of failing.  Myself and other entrepreneurs are terrified of not trying.  You will never experience a time where you are free from making mistakes.  Get over it.

    Am I doing as well as Bob?

    Never dwell on how you measure up to others.  I will admit, I am guilty of this, but have learned to recognize the times I waste thinking this way and quickly shift into more positive thought.  Worry about you and your situation.  It’s like comparing yourself to billionaire entrepreneurs instead of who they were when they were first starting and had nothing. You will always come up short.

    What to Always Remember.

    Think Different. 

    Quit thinking like an employee.  Many entrepreneurs learn to love the struggle and experience.  Employees are too concerned with comfort and security.

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    Don’t follow the rules.

    Many entrepreneurs can’t stand authority.  I can certainly relate to that.  I’m definitely not suggesting to break any laws, but some rules are meant to be broken.  For example, do you think I care about writing “properly?”  Or imagine if Pollock, Picasso, and Dali decided to “follow the rules…”  Same for Jobs, Zuckerberg, and Branson.

    Work is an opportunity.

    Entrepreneurs don’t just work to earn, they work to create and benefit others.  They love what they do so that working feels more like opportunity than necessity.  It’s important to love what you do.  Don’t waste another minute doing something you hate.  

    What to Learn to Think.

    Where can I add value? 

    This is the key right here.  Entrepreneurs create new products or services by always asking themselves where they can add value.  Richard Branson recommends entrepreneurs constantly be asking themselves, “what is wrong in my life and how can I make it better?”  The more value you add, and the more people you add value to, the more successful you will be.

    Be Authentic.

    Customers can smell a fake a mile away.  Be authentic in what you do, and don’t pretend to be something you’re not.

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    My gut is usually right.

    I can’t just tell you to follow your gut.  First, you need to start keeping tabs on your gut instincts.  How good is your track record?  If it’s really good then learn to follow it.  If not, then understand why it’s not and improve upon it.  This gets complicated, but it’s essentially known as intrapersonal intelligence.  You’ll find that most entrepreneurs are strong at this ability.  The good news is that it’s not just something you’re born with.  It is learn-able.  

    Remember, people don’t need to be educated as much as they need be reminded.  Print out this map and stick it in a common place.  Use it to occasionally calibrate your cognitive alignment. But, I’m curious.  Why even aspire to be an entrepreneur?

    I cannot speak for us all, but here are three of my reasons:

    1. Live life on my terms, not my employers.

    2. Control my time.

    3. Control my income.

    Obviously, I’m all about control and freedom, but I am confident in suggesting many entrepreneurs feel the same way. Because you’re reading this I assume you are a current or aspiring entrepreneur.

    So what are your reasons? Please share with us below.

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    This “Railway Map” Will Tell You How To Think Like An Entrepreneur

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    Last Updated on March 23, 2021

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

    The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

    You need more than time management. You need energy management

    1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

    How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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    I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

    I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

    2. Determine your “peak hours”

    Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

    Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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    My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

    In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

    Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

    3. Block those high-energy hours

    Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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    Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

    If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

    That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

    There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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    Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

    Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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