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These 11 Millennials Prove that You Are On the Right Track

These 11 Millennials Prove that You Are On the Right Track

We’ve heard it all before: millennials are lazy, entitled, impatient and constantly glued to social media. Some of that might be true. But here are 11 so-called millennial traits and ideas and the way people have used them to accomplish some amazing things.

1. Posessing an unstoppable drive

brianKearne2
    Brian Kearney

    a 23-year-old college student who started his own PR firm, believes his unstoppable drive has allowed him to be successful. 

    The millennial mindset has definitely helped me get to where I am today. Like most millennials, I have an unstoppable drive and feel there’s no limit to what I can achieve if I put my mind to it. 

    2. Feeling entitled

    Krystian-3b-site
      Krystian Szastok, a 28-year-old digital marketer who came from Poland to England at the age of 20 after dropping out of university, believes his sense of entitlement allowed him to increase his income significantly. 

      The mentality of being ever optimistic and having a “can do” attitude, combined with the sense of entitlement allows me to never settle for anything and always go an extra mile to accomplish my goals. 

      3. Constantly improving

      Michelle_Pic
        Michelle Burke is the 24-year-old marketing supervisor for WyckWyre and believes her constant desire to better herself has been key to her success. 

        Millennials love feedback from managers, whether positive or constructive criticism, to learn how to advance themselves. Work on individual and group projects at work to further your career and skills in the workplace, and this will lead to ultimate success. 

        4. Being idealistic

        Seanhiggins

          Sean Higgins is the co-founder of software company, Ilos, that just closed its seed funding round, and he believes that being idealistic help millennials get ahead. 

          We’re idealists because in any new venture there will be good days and bad. Honing in on how you help people and listening to the feedback you get are the things that keep you going. It’s that passion, that commitment, that gets you through tough times. 

          5. Putting freedom before money

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          brad-hines
            Brad Hines

            is a 30-year-old lifehacker and digital marketing strategist who believes that putting freedom and lifestyle before money has made him successful.

            I have total work flexibility in a job I created myself, freedom to travel, I am healthy, and I focus more on enjoying work than making the most money. A lot of the lifehacking mentality has helped, for example, I put my finances and menial work on automation this year. 

            6. Putting meaning before money

            JJpaint
              Jill Jacinto, 29-year-old associate editorial and communications director, believes that millennials are successful because they seek out meaningful careers instead of chasing dollars. 

              The millennial generation created a nation of people who are doing their best to truly live their dreams. We’re no longer accepting jobs based on dollar signs. We’re seeking professions with merit and meaning. We’re looking to work hard but enjoy life — it’s not just a façade for Instagram. 

              7. Doing things your own way

              Graham with Manny Pacquiao

                Graham Bensinger, 28-year-old host and creator of “In Depth With Graham Bensinger,” believes that doing things differently and straying from the path of “normal” has created success for him. After a bad experience interviewing Terrell Owens for traditional sports media lead to Terrell being suspended, Graham created his own sports interview show that allows him to do things his way. 

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                As a freelance interviewer, I sometimes found myself unsatisfied as I handed over editorial control to a producer because I was unsure of what he or she would decide to air. By creating my own show, I have the freedom of choice and the episodes reflect my preferred approach to deeper, well-rounded discussions with prolific sports figures. 

                8. Taking risks

                jenny-tchinnosian-2
                  Jenny Tchinnosian is the founder and director of SoulFire, a digital communication agency. The 27-year-old was born in Argentina and believes that her ability to take risks has allowed her to create a life that she is excited to get up and begin each day. 

                  I worked at National Geographic, The Associated Press, and had a high-paying job in Washington, DC when I began to seriously consider moving back to Argentina. I had not lived there since I was 10 and leaving it all to find my roots and start a business seemed like a huge risk; there was so much at stake. But I thought about it long and hard, then went for it. 

                  9. Being bold

                  lolita
                    Lolita Taub came from a poor family in a gang-ridden neighborhood in South Central LA and now has sold over $45 million in hardware/software/services in her career working for major technology providers. She believes her success came from her bold aspirations to transcend expectations. 

                    I credit my success with being bold in who I am compared to the expectations of society. For example, exceeding the normal expectations of a poor, Mexican-American, inner-city girl and being confident that my own wants are worth pursuing, and knowing that I can accomplish whatever I put my mind to. 

                    10. Challenging authority

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                    mitchellstern
                      Mitchell Stern, 30-year-old founder of Burning Bush Nurseries, which sells live cannabis plants to licensed medical marijuana dispensaries, believes that millennials’ enthusiasm for challenging authority is key to his success. 

                      Millennials have supreme confidence in our own ability to decide what’s best for ourselves and we let our experience with something trump the rhetoric that may accompany it. Furthermore, we believe in challenging authority and making decisions based on science instead of fear. 

                      11. Being motivated by “why” instead of “what”

                      jakeducey

                        Jake Ducey is a 23-year-old author and motivational speaker who believes millennials succeed because they ask “why?” instead of “what?” 

                        Millennials are less moved by the glamouring possibility of a big house, and gold watch and more interested in work we love. The millennial mentality is to not go where the path may lead, but instead to leave the path and make your own trail. We want to find something we actually love doing.

                        Featured photo credit: photo credit: photopin via flickr via flickr.com

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                        Last Updated on December 3, 2020

                        15 Strategies for an Effective To-Do List

                        15 Strategies for an Effective To-Do List

                        One of the age-old productivity techniques around is the classic and effective to do list, and for good reason. It’s one of the most productive ways for you and everyone else to get anything done. Whether it’s a mental list or something that you are writing down, a to do list is an essential productivity tool.

                        At the same time, it is one of the most confusing productivity tools around. Many people discredit this for various reasons and don’t believe that a to do list is any good. But my argument is that maybe you and other people aren’t making an effective to do list, so here we will go over how to get one done right.

                        Why Bother With an Effective To-Do List?

                        You’ve Been Using Them Wrong

                        Before jumping into strategies to make an effective to do list, it’s worth knowing why you should bother making one. The first important point is that many people have been making to do lists all wrong.

                        Two of the most common mistakes are:

                        • People use lists as a measurement of whether they are productive or not.
                        • They put too many items on the list.

                        It’s understandable why you or other people do this, though. A to do list is a productivity tool, so it makes sense to pile on tasks. However, the brain doesn’t work that way. If you have a lot of tasks on your list, it feels like torture as the list never ends.

                        At first, it can feel nice that you always have something to do, but keep in mind that you only have so much time in a day. It’s important that you place more value in quality work rather than sheer quantity.

                        On that same note, if you are someone who has a tendency to seek validation, a to do list can be tough. There will be days where you won’t get everything done due to life events. This creates unnecessary pressure and sends you into a stress whirlwind.

                        It Helps You Stay Focused

                        When you build an effective to-do list, the main goal of these lists is to provide clarity and focus. If you’ve been doing them wrong, you may have noticed that you are focusing in on a task on your to do list and getting it done.

                        This may be overshadowed by the multiple items on your list, but you are focusing on a task during a given time. You really see this in action when you consider having a shorter to do list, though.

                        I understand that a to do list isn’t for every single person, but this focus is helpful to people when starting out. You’re still not certain about your goals or the path that you want to take. You may also struggle to determine the next step to work towards.

                        A to do list is a guide you can refer back to it whenever you need it. Furthermore, the techniques that I’ll be mentioning below will make to do lists more effective for you.

                        15 Strategies for an Effective To Do List

                        You’ll begin to see how powerful a to do list is when you consider the various strategies you can incorporate in one. This is your to do list, so pick from the strategies below to find what suits you. If you’re not certain, don’t be afraid to experiment and mishmash several combinations.

                        Remember that the road to success is one with many branching paths, so the methods you use are your choice.

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                        1. Break the List Into Two Parts

                        The first strategy is to break a list into two parts. These two parts are called dailies and to do’s.

                        Dailies are the everyday tasks that you want to develop more. For example, if you want to make a habit out of exercising in the morning, a daily task could be following a 15-minute workout routine or going for an hour-long walk.

                        Your to do’s are non-daily tasks that you need to be getting done at some point. Maybe you need to prepare a report at work or make a presentation. You can put that into your to do column.

                        This is an effective strategy because it saves all the clutter that most people gravitate towards. As mentioned before, people stuff their lists, and a lot of it is usually tasks they you would do anyway, like going grocery shopping or dropping the kids off at a friend’s place.

                        2. Put a Limit on Items

                        If you find breaking your list into two parts too much, I’ll suggest brevity to be a virtue when making these lists. You can set any number of items, but the key is that you do have a set limit in mind. Some people have no more than seven while others go as low as three. Do what makes you feel comfortable.

                        The idea behind this is to narrow in on the most important tasks that you need to accomplish that day. Of course, there are other things that you’ll be doing during the day, and that’s fine, but you want to prioritize the items that on your to do list before the day is done.

                        3. Use Checklists for Complex Tasks

                        If you’re already making narrow lists but are putting in tougher tasks, my suggestion is to break that task down. Whether it’s full-on steps you need to take or jotting down important details that need to be present is up to you.

                        Either way, this allows you to ensure that you’re getting everything done the proper way and that you’re not missing any key details or steps.

                        4. Tackle MITs First

                        MIT is the “most important task.” Another way to look at this is to tackle the largest and most intimidating task first[1]. Why you want to do this goes back to how our brain works.

                        You may feel compelled to do the easier tasks first before getting to the bigger task, but the problem is that these tasks—even the easy ones—drain your energy. Furthermore, if you have a really big task to complete, chances are that’s going to be on your mind over the course of the day. That means you’re spending more energy just thinking about it.

                        All of that wouldn’t be a problem if that big intimidating task was dealt with first thing in the morning.

                        5. Create a “Done” List

                        Another interesting approach to consider is to have a “done” list. This is a list of the tasks that you’ve completed from your to do list. Many people find it satisfying to merely cross an item off their list and be done with it, but depending on what you’re putting on those lists, a done list could be inspiring.

                        Imagine if you are someone who places above-average difficult tasks on your to do lists, activities that require an hour or two to complete properly. This can inspire you to do more if, after a day of working, you notice just how much you accomplished over the course of the day via this list.

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                        6. Make Your List Easy to Spot

                        From colorful paper to posting it in an obvious spot, you want your list to be in a place where you can spot it easily. Mind you, you don’t need to have this list in front of you all the time as it could create unnecessary stress. But setting it to one side is a nice idea—a glance to the side and you know exactly what needs to get done.

                        7. Add Gaming Elements to It

                        If pen and paper isn’t your thing when making to do lists, there are several apps that can guide you along as well. The beauty of to do list apps is that there is more room for creativity, and some of the developers incorporate games into them.

                        For example, Todoist has an achievement system where individuals earn badges as they complete more tasks. There’s also Bounty Tasker, which makes you feel like your tasks are side quests in a video game.

                        8. Give Yourself Deadlines

                        Work expands to fill time allotted.

                        It’s an old philosophy that still rings true with how we are productive. For example, say you’re assigned to write a report, and you’re given a week to do it. You’ll likely work on it steadily throughout the week. Or if you’re a procrastinator, you’ll put it off until the night before and finish it.

                        But what if you’re given that same task and only allotted an hour to complete it? You’ll likely get the report done, but you’ll prioritize the main, important points and highlight those rather than fill it with unnecessary fluff.

                        The whole point of this is that with your goals and the items on your to do list, you want to have deadlines. When it comes to to do lists, my suggestion is to give yourself a day to complete the tasks there. This is enough pressure and incentive for you to work hard on them.

                        9. Add Tasks When They’re Fresh

                        Another strategy is to assign yourself tasks even when you are working on something else. Keep in mind it’s not something you have to do right now, but this can help with people who are struggling to think about what to focus on next.

                        This is along the same lines as when you hear something interesting and you write it down. It’s a wise thing to do as it saves you the bother of having to dwell on that idea rather than focusing on the task at hand. It also saves you from having to recall what the task is if you’re the type to write up the next day’s to do list at the end of the day.

                        10. Be Comfortable With Revising Your To-Do List

                        Depending on your overall mindset, another good strategy is to look at your to do list and make changes to it. If you’re practicing the previous strategy, there may be a possibility that your to do list is getting lengthy and you’re setting unrealistic expectations that you can finish it all.

                        By giving yourself the opportunity to revise your to do list, your allowing yourself to spread out your tasks rather than have them clumped up. This helps your mindset as you’re not overwhelmed by the list.

                        11. Write Tasks, Not Goals

                        You should have separate lists for your tasks and your goals. The idea is to not put goals on your task list at all.

                        While tasks can help you lead to your goals, goals are larger desires and not something that you can achieve over the course of the day. For example, “learn to speak French” is a goal; however, you can break that into a task by saying “read French content for 15 minutes” or “watch a movie in French.”

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                        This also extends to objectives, too. You can see these as milestones. Going back to the example of speaking French, an objective can be, “discuss my favorite foods with someone in French.” It’s the desired outcome that you’re looking for from your practice.

                        12. Keep To Do Lists Brief

                        Here, brief means scannable in that you can quickly look over at the list and know what needs to get done. How you can do this is by focusing on the keywords of specific tasks and not dragging them out. For example, say your garage is a mess and you want to clean it up. Instead of writing a lengthy sentence, keep it short and write something like “clean garage for 30 min.” or simply “clean garage.”

                        With this strategy, you’re spending less time writing the task down when making the to do list. Furthermore, you’re relying on trigger words to get your mind to recall specific details for that task.

                        13. Have Multiple Lists

                        As mentioned above, it’s a good idea to have separate lists for various things, like having a separate list for goals, objectives, daily tasks, and to do’s. Another way you can look at it is to have a system where you are consulting from three lists.

                        These lists are:

                        A Master List

                        This is where any of your long-term goals are, things like moving to a new house, getting out of debt, or building a business. These are things that will take a year or more to accomplish.

                        A Weekly Project List

                        These are things that you want to accomplish by the end of the week. These are things that will move the needle slowly towards some of the items on your master list. From the previous example, these could be doing research on getting a business loan, house hunting, or setting up a savings account.

                        A High-Impact List

                        Lastly, these are tasks that need to be accomplished today. Whether they are related to the previous two lists or not doesn’t matter. This is where high priority tasks are placed. Examples can be calling specific people or working on a project or a report that’s due soon.

                        By having these lists in place, you’ll be referring often to the weekly project list and the high-impact list and determining whether a weekly task should be moved to that list.

                        As you do that, you’ll begin to notice how much your daily life has an impact on those goals that are written on that master list. That can be inspiring since what you are doing is actively bringing you closer to your goals.

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                        14. Don’t Ramp up Difficulty Until You’re Ready

                        Some of the strategies mentioned can seem easy on the surface, but they require a lot of mental fortitude. Motivation is an unusual thing, and our brains are wired to process a certain way. If you’re looking for genuine change and something that sticks, the best principle is to keep things simple and easy at first.

                        It may be a drag, but you don’t often realize how those baby steps can play a crucial role in you being able to start running and chasing your dreams. Don’t be ashamed if you have to start off with simple tasks for yourself. Even going back to daily tasks that you do anyway like showering, doing the laundry or shopping for food is a good way to start.

                        Putting those items on the list at first makes you feel like you’ve had a productive day. From there, you can challenge yourself with more difficult tasks. Incorporate an exercise routine or spend a half-hour on a task that means something to you.

                        The idea is to ease yourself into a routine so you don’t feel overwhelmed.

                        15. Measure Your Time

                        The last strategy that can help you is to measure your time. How long does it take you to finish a specific task? You don’t need to go for specifics, but make a point of timing yourself over the course of a week and get the average time spent on that task.

                        Why is this important? This information can be broken down in two ways.

                        The first way is to use it as a marker to boost efficiency. Depending on the task, you can find new ways to achieve the same results in a shorter time.

                        It also allows you to know what you can do in a given day. If you know that it takes you an hour or so to go through your entire morning routine, you’ll be more conscious about how you move through that routine.

                        Furthermore, if you know what tasks you’ll be doing the next day, you can better manage your time since you know roughly how much time it’ll take to get everything done.

                        Final Thoughts

                        Building an effective to do list is not as easy as it seems. There are all kinds of unique strategies to try out, some more challenging that others. However, if you are motivated to use this productivity tool to make your life easier, then it will get easier. All that you need to do is keep putting effort and experiment and reevaluate when necessary. So get started with your to do lists today.

                        More Tips on Using an Effective To Do List

                        Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews Digital Content Production via unsplash.com

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