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These 11 Millennials Prove that You Are On the Right Track

These 11 Millennials Prove that You Are On the Right Track
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We’ve heard it all before: millennials are lazy, entitled, impatient and constantly glued to social media. Some of that might be true. But here are 11 so-called millennial traits and ideas and the way people have used them to accomplish some amazing things.

1. Posessing an unstoppable drive

brianKearne2
    Brian Kearney

    a 23-year-old college student who started his own PR firm, believes his unstoppable drive has allowed him to be successful. 

    The millennial mindset has definitely helped me get to where I am today. Like most millennials, I have an unstoppable drive and feel there’s no limit to what I can achieve if I put my mind to it. 

    2. Feeling entitled

    Krystian-3b-site
      Krystian Szastok, a 28-year-old digital marketer who came from Poland to England at the age of 20 after dropping out of university, believes his sense of entitlement allowed him to increase his income significantly. 

      The mentality of being ever optimistic and having a “can do” attitude, combined with the sense of entitlement allows me to never settle for anything and always go an extra mile to accomplish my goals. 

      3. Constantly improving

      Michelle_Pic
        Michelle Burke is the 24-year-old marketing supervisor for WyckWyre and believes her constant desire to better herself has been key to her success. 

        Millennials love feedback from managers, whether positive or constructive criticism, to learn how to advance themselves. Work on individual and group projects at work to further your career and skills in the workplace, and this will lead to ultimate success. 

        4. Being idealistic

        Seanhiggins

          Sean Higgins is the co-founder of software company, Ilos, that just closed its seed funding round, and he believes that being idealistic help millennials get ahead. 

          We’re idealists because in any new venture there will be good days and bad. Honing in on how you help people and listening to the feedback you get are the things that keep you going. It’s that passion, that commitment, that gets you through tough times. 

          5. Putting freedom before money

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          brad-hines
            Brad Hines

            is a 30-year-old lifehacker and digital marketing strategist who believes that putting freedom and lifestyle before money has made him successful.

            I have total work flexibility in a job I created myself, freedom to travel, I am healthy, and I focus more on enjoying work than making the most money. A lot of the lifehacking mentality has helped, for example, I put my finances and menial work on automation this year. 

            6. Putting meaning before money

            JJpaint
              Jill Jacinto, 29-year-old associate editorial and communications director, believes that millennials are successful because they seek out meaningful careers instead of chasing dollars. 

              The millennial generation created a nation of people who are doing their best to truly live their dreams. We’re no longer accepting jobs based on dollar signs. We’re seeking professions with merit and meaning. We’re looking to work hard but enjoy life — it’s not just a façade for Instagram. 

              7. Doing things your own way

              Graham with Manny Pacquiao

                Graham Bensinger, 28-year-old host and creator of “In Depth With Graham Bensinger,” believes that doing things differently and straying from the path of “normal” has created success for him. After a bad experience interviewing Terrell Owens for traditional sports media lead to Terrell being suspended, Graham created his own sports interview show that allows him to do things his way. 

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                As a freelance interviewer, I sometimes found myself unsatisfied as I handed over editorial control to a producer because I was unsure of what he or she would decide to air. By creating my own show, I have the freedom of choice and the episodes reflect my preferred approach to deeper, well-rounded discussions with prolific sports figures. 

                8. Taking risks

                jenny-tchinnosian-2
                  Jenny Tchinnosian is the founder and director of SoulFire, a digital communication agency. The 27-year-old was born in Argentina and believes that her ability to take risks has allowed her to create a life that she is excited to get up and begin each day. 

                  I worked at National Geographic, The Associated Press, and had a high-paying job in Washington, DC when I began to seriously consider moving back to Argentina. I had not lived there since I was 10 and leaving it all to find my roots and start a business seemed like a huge risk; there was so much at stake. But I thought about it long and hard, then went for it. 

                  9. Being bold

                  lolita
                    Lolita Taub came from a poor family in a gang-ridden neighborhood in South Central LA and now has sold over $45 million in hardware/software/services in her career working for major technology providers. She believes her success came from her bold aspirations to transcend expectations. 

                    I credit my success with being bold in who I am compared to the expectations of society. For example, exceeding the normal expectations of a poor, Mexican-American, inner-city girl and being confident that my own wants are worth pursuing, and knowing that I can accomplish whatever I put my mind to. 

                    10. Challenging authority

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                    mitchellstern
                      Mitchell Stern, 30-year-old founder of Burning Bush Nurseries, which sells live cannabis plants to licensed medical marijuana dispensaries, believes that millennials’ enthusiasm for challenging authority is key to his success. 

                      Millennials have supreme confidence in our own ability to decide what’s best for ourselves and we let our experience with something trump the rhetoric that may accompany it. Furthermore, we believe in challenging authority and making decisions based on science instead of fear. 

                      11. Being motivated by “why” instead of “what”

                      jakeducey

                        Jake Ducey is a 23-year-old author and motivational speaker who believes millennials succeed because they ask “why?” instead of “what?” 

                        Millennials are less moved by the glamouring possibility of a big house, and gold watch and more interested in work we love. The millennial mentality is to not go where the path may lead, but instead to leave the path and make your own trail. We want to find something we actually love doing.

                        Featured photo credit: photo credit: photopin via flickr via flickr.com

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                        Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                        The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                        The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                        No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                        Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                        Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                        A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                        Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                        In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                        From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                        A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                        For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                        This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                        The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                        That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                        Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                        The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                        Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                        But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                        The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                        The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                        A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                        For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                        But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                        If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                        For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                        These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                        For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                        How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                        Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                        Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                        Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                        My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                        Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                        I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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                        Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                        Reference

                        [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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