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Relativity Can Tell Us A Lot About Productivity

Relativity Can Tell Us A Lot About Productivity

“Perhaps we’ve just forgotten that we are still pioneers. That we’ve barely begun. That our greatest accomplishments cannot be behind us. That our destiny lies above us.”

Recently Interstellar (2014) has become quite popular. Like many people, its thought-provoking, ambitious plot may have inspired you. But maybe you’ve begun to question its relevance in your own life. If so, you’re on to something fairly significant.

Most people don’t know that Einstein’s theory of relativity can actually be applied to productivity.

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If we pull back the shades on his theory, you’ll see that it’s divided into two distinct parts: “special” and “general” relativity. Special relativity basically explains that motion is defined relative to an inert frame of reference like time and space — where there is no gravity. On the other hand, general relativity expands this notion by including gravity as a dependent variable in the equation.

Because everyone wants to be more productive, especially at the beginning of a new year, let’s take a closer look at key contributions from relativity that can help you to achieve greater productivity.

1. Reach for higher gravitational potential

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Like in the movie Interstellar, gravitational time dilation helps explain the notion that time flies when we are having fun, but drags when we are doing some mundane activity, like writing a history paper! If you want to guarantee your ability to produce more and faster, fix your sites on a higher gravitational plain by increasing optimistic thoughts and envisioning positive outcomes. This process helps release your “natural high” energy with godsends like serotonin and gets your feel-good juices flowing. You will be able to move through tasks with lightning speed and you’ll feel pretty unstoppable during the process, too.

2. Step into the black hole every now and again

Are you afraid of time standing still? What would happen if you could only do…nothing? A black hole — a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light cannot get out — offers the possibility of doing just that. Why would someone purposely choose to go into a black hole to increase productivity? Well, every now and again you need to step away from all the distractions and the noise — sometimes even your own mental noise — to gain fresh perspectives and return to your work renewed and ready to create at the highest level.

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3. Generate motion, then build momentum
Motion has the potential to build incredible momentum, especially when speed becomes part of the equation. Momentum, an important element of Einstein’s theory of relativity, explains that when you push a freely moving object it will naturally accelerate. Have you pushed yourself lately? If so, how effective were you in producing results? Challenge yourself to move — physically, mentally, and emotionally. Then, dial up the dynamism and increase your momentum. It’s about breaking free from apathy and inertia to get results.

4. Formulate a powerful perspective, enabling you reach for your inner-pioneer

Your ability to produce results is based on your perspective, your mental view, or outlook. Relativity advances this premise with the notion that the speed at which you progress through time varies with your frame of reference and relative motion vis a vis the object you are observing. Moreover, different observers experience time differently (perspective is everything!). Developing a powerful perspective will help you increase the speed at which you move through difficulties and generate the will and ingenuity to produce results.

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5. Connect the dots by embracing the power of the Tesseract

You can choose to flatline or live life in 3D, fully experiencing the visceral nature of all that it has to offer. But if you’re really ambitious and willing to raise the stakes on your productivity, reach for the power of the Tesseract and go all the way to the fourth dimension. The point is to use innovation and jettison convention to increase your results. Be bold. Be fearless. Think outside the box and let nothing stop you.

In case you were uncertain that you could become more productive this year, Einstein got it right and so can you. Think about how you can increase your productivity using these century old principles that can breathe life into your sluggish routine.

Featured photo credit: space via google.com.hk

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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