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How To Focus and Think Creatively When Interruptions Are Everywhere

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How To Focus and Think Creatively When Interruptions Are Everywhere

Do you ever feel so overwhelmed by a constant barrage of text messages, phone calls, and stressful thoughts that you don’t know what to do first? There’s no denying that it can be hard to concentrate in the information age, where there is an interruption waiting to disrupt your train of thought behind every corner. Boost your focus and think creatively in these four ways.

Act now (not later!).

“One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly, until he knows that every day is Doomsday.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Most people are so caught up in stressful future things they can’t control that they don’t appreciate the things they can do right NOW to improve their life. Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you had to complete what sounded like a complicated project in a REALLY short period of time? If so, I bet you were surprised by how much work you can get done quickly when you have no other options. With that in mind, below are some common stressful thoughts that make it difficult to focus on the present moment, and the actionable solutions you should swap in their place.

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“I don’t know how I’ll be ever able to afford (insert bill here).”

“I will save up some extra money by cutting all unnecessary expenses, working an extra shift, selling some clothes I never wear, offering to do yard-work or baby-sitting for my friends, or finding a side-hustle I can pursue on my own time.” 

“I wish I could stop worrying about that hurtful thing my friend or partner said earlier.”

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“I will confront them about this issue as soon as I get home, because I know things only get worse when I put off difficult conversations.”

“I don’t know if the person I like returns the feeling, and I can’t get them off my mind.”

“I will test the waters by inviting them to go play pool, see a movie, have a drink, (insert fun thing here). Even if they don’t like me, it would be better to find out sooner than later, because then I will be able to move on.” 

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Silence your phone.

“Do stuff. Be clenched, curious. Not waiting for inspiration’s shove or society’s kiss on your forehead. Pay attention. It’s all about paying attention. Attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. Stay eager.” — Susan Sontag

It is amazing that we carry around devices capable of accessing all of the knowledge known to man, yet we use them in the least productive way possible. There is nothing wrong with communicating with your friends via text, but leaving your cell phone’s volume turned up all the time is an open invitation for procrastination to sneak in. If a person really needs something, then they will leave a voice-mail (and as an added bonus, they’ll probably be a lot more concise about it than they would have been in an actual conversation).

Keep a book with you.

“Around here, however, we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious…and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” — Walt Disney Company

Speaking of cell phones, stop pissing away every precious moment of silence you have by playing Angry Birds (or whatever silly game is popular these days). Keep a book in your car or purse to read during any unplanned down-time. You will engage your mind with an active learning experience that introduces you to new ideas, or in the case of fiction, be whisked away to a new world where you’ll be challenged to create a mental picture of characters that are only described in words. Consider keeping pen and paper with you at all times, too, because if you’re ever struck with a brilliant thought that you don’t want to risk forgetting, you’ll be able to write it down as soon as it occurs to you. 

Take a break to meditate.

“Lack of direction, not lack of time, is the problem. We all have twenty-four hour days.”
― Zig Ziglar

Your brain can only focus on a task for 45 minutes at a time, so you might want to take a mini-break once per hour to improve your concentration. You could take a quick walk outside, look at the sky, identify cloud shapes, quiet your inner-chatter, and listen to bird songs. If you have a job that won’t allow you to escape your desk, you could simply stand up and stretch out the areas of your body that feel stiff. And before you get back to work, take a moment to meditate (it only takes a minute!).

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How do you think creatively despite the interruptions that surround you? Tell us in the comments, then click the share button to invite your friends to the conversation.

Featured photo credit: Bos Ross/Sip and Splash via sipandsplash.com

More by this author

Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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