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How To Focus and Think Creatively When Interruptions Are Everywhere

How To Focus and Think Creatively When Interruptions Are Everywhere

Do you ever feel so overwhelmed by a constant barrage of text messages, phone calls, and stressful thoughts that you don’t know what to do first? There’s no denying that it can be hard to concentrate in the information age, where there is an interruption waiting to disrupt your train of thought behind every corner. Boost your focus and think creatively in these four ways.

Act now (not later!).

“One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly, until he knows that every day is Doomsday.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Most people are so caught up in stressful future things they can’t control that they don’t appreciate the things they can do right NOW to improve their life. Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you had to complete what sounded like a complicated project in a REALLY short period of time? If so, I bet you were surprised by how much work you can get done quickly when you have no other options. With that in mind, below are some common stressful thoughts that make it difficult to focus on the present moment, and the actionable solutions you should swap in their place.

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“I don’t know how I’ll be ever able to afford (insert bill here).”

“I will save up some extra money by cutting all unnecessary expenses, working an extra shift, selling some clothes I never wear, offering to do yard-work or baby-sitting for my friends, or finding a side-hustle I can pursue on my own time.” 

“I wish I could stop worrying about that hurtful thing my friend or partner said earlier.”

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“I will confront them about this issue as soon as I get home, because I know things only get worse when I put off difficult conversations.”

“I don’t know if the person I like returns the feeling, and I can’t get them off my mind.”

“I will test the waters by inviting them to go play pool, see a movie, have a drink, (insert fun thing here). Even if they don’t like me, it would be better to find out sooner than later, because then I will be able to move on.” 

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Silence your phone.

“Do stuff. Be clenched, curious. Not waiting for inspiration’s shove or society’s kiss on your forehead. Pay attention. It’s all about paying attention. Attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. Stay eager.” — Susan Sontag

It is amazing that we carry around devices capable of accessing all of the knowledge known to man, yet we use them in the least productive way possible. There is nothing wrong with communicating with your friends via text, but leaving your cell phone’s volume turned up all the time is an open invitation for procrastination to sneak in. If a person really needs something, then they will leave a voice-mail (and as an added bonus, they’ll probably be a lot more concise about it than they would have been in an actual conversation).

Keep a book with you.

“Around here, however, we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious…and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” — Walt Disney Company

Speaking of cell phones, stop pissing away every precious moment of silence you have by playing Angry Birds (or whatever silly game is popular these days). Keep a book in your car or purse to read during any unplanned down-time. You will engage your mind with an active learning experience that introduces you to new ideas, or in the case of fiction, be whisked away to a new world where you’ll be challenged to create a mental picture of characters that are only described in words. Consider keeping pen and paper with you at all times, too, because if you’re ever struck with a brilliant thought that you don’t want to risk forgetting, you’ll be able to write it down as soon as it occurs to you. 

Take a break to meditate.

“Lack of direction, not lack of time, is the problem. We all have twenty-four hour days.”
― Zig Ziglar

Your brain can only focus on a task for 45 minutes at a time, so you might want to take a mini-break once per hour to improve your concentration. You could take a quick walk outside, look at the sky, identify cloud shapes, quiet your inner-chatter, and listen to bird songs. If you have a job that won’t allow you to escape your desk, you could simply stand up and stretch out the areas of your body that feel stiff. And before you get back to work, take a moment to meditate (it only takes a minute!).

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How do you think creatively despite the interruptions that surround you? Tell us in the comments, then click the share button to invite your friends to the conversation.

Featured photo credit: Bos Ross/Sip and Splash via sipandsplash.com

More by this author

Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

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