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8 Revision Mistakes You May Have Been Making

8 Revision Mistakes You May Have Been Making

If you have an exam coming up, you may find that you are desperately short of time for some vital revision. This is the case for the majority of students and we have all been there. But there are some revision mistakes you can avoid making to ensure your revision is both effective and organized. Here are 8 revision mistakes to avoid and suggestions about what you should do instead.

1. You think that cramming will work

You may think that intensive revision during a long period of time will be effective. It is actually a waste of time and energy. Studying for long hours will tire your brain and there is no guarantee that you will remember the facts in the long term, although in the short term, you might. UCLA researchers have found that cutting back on sleep while studying for long periods of time results in academic performance being negatively affected.

The best thing to do is to build in short revision periods as you learn. This consistency will pay handsome dividends in the long term because it helps to move material from your short term memory into the long term memory. This will make the final revision so much easier.

2. You think that revising with friends is always a good idea

In many countries, studying and revising together with other students is very popular. It may work for some students but the fact is that each student has a different learning style. Some learners are visual learners while others do better with auditory material. Their timetables may not suit you and your capabilities are bound to be different. On the other hand, their perspectives on certain topics may help you discover different viewpoints.

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Group work is not always a good idea, but you can profit from it if you do it right. The Open University recommends that you try to teach others in your group what you have learned. It is a great way to test how well you have revised and how effectively you have mastered some concepts, ideas or facts. If you prefer revising alone and find other students’ presence off-putting and distracting, then opt to go solo.

3. You are not familiar with the exam tasks

Many students fail to study carefully the actual questions they may be asked. There may be open essay type questions, multiple choice options or discussion topics, depending on the subject matter. It is always a good idea to download past papers, so that you know what to expect when you get into the exam room.

This is an essential part of a revision plan because you will be focusing on what you actually have to do with the learned material on the day of the test. But you have to revise thoroughly. There is no point in simplay working through loads of past test papers, hoping you might get the same questions. Answering exam questions is not the same as memorizing and revising knowledge.

4. You do not make enough breaks

Some students never make proper breaks during their revision time. They go for hours and think that drinking coffee or even taking study stimulants will keep them going. This is not the best use of their time. Most experts now say that around 40/45 minutes is the ideal study time block. After that you should have a break by going for a walk or doing some stretching exercises or even relaxing with a computer game. Breaks should be about 10 minutes long. But again, remember that individual learning styles can vary.

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5. You are not getting the support you need

Many students fail to involve their family members or friends in a supportive way. They do not warn them that they should not be interrupted. They never bother to tell them that their final revision time is precious and that they need a proper diet, regular mealtimes, enough sleep and exercise. The most useful tactic is to get them all involved so that they know your timetable and also know why this exam is so important for you.

You can also ask them at certain times to give you a thorough test of your knowledge by getting them to interrogate you. Show them your notes and ask them to give you the third degree! This may work for you and it also involves your family much more.

6. You have not checked your optimal routine

Everybody says that you should study early in the morning when you are most alert. But this is not true for everyone. You need to make sure that your routine fits in well with your daily circadian rhythms or your sleep-wake cycle. The best solution is to actually find out what might be the best time to revise as some people actually perform better as the day wears on.

Do the BBC quiz here to make sure you are on the right track with your revision schedule. There are also useful revision timetable planners online. Find out about these and see whether they can help you if you have problems in getting your revision time organized.

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7. You underestimate the importance of physical exercise

A lot of students actually cut down their exercise regime while revising. This is the worst thing they can do. Your brain is tired but your body is not! In addition, the movement will improve your blood circulation and that means your brain will get more oxygen which will help to improve its performance during this critical time. Always go for a walk or run when your brain starts to get tired.

8. You do not test yourself on a regular basis

I know a lot of students who do not regularly test themselves on what they have learned and do not know whether they have really revised sufficiently. This is a big mistake as reading over notes again and again is just not enough. This is what Ed Cooke, the British memory champion, recommends.

He suggests that students should test themselves at intervals of say, 10 minutes after the first revision, then more tests an hour later and then after a day or two. This is the only way to ensure that the knowledge is stored in your long term memory.

If you avoid the above mistakes, you will be able to revise much more efficiently and save loads of time as well.

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Let us know in the comments what techniques you use to make your revision less painful.

Featured photo credit: 272/365 Outdoor Revision/Stuartpilbrow via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on April 6, 2020

The Ultimate Guide to Prioritizing Your Work And Life

The Ultimate Guide to Prioritizing Your Work And Life

Do you ever find yourself telling a friend or colleague that you’re “so busy” whenever they ask how you’re doing? Or, that you “have a lot on your plate and hardly have any time for yourself”?

These are common answers to the question: “ how are you doing?”. Perhaps you see it as an easy response that doesn’t need much explanation.  Or, it could be that you’re in disbelief at the end of the week, wondering where all that time went.

The reality is that time is precious and waits for no man. Yet, many of us unconsciously squander time away; but when  that realization kicks in, it’s often too late, or you have little time left to spare. And, the end result of what you were going to accomplish either gets short changed or fails altogether.

Think about the time when you had to be up early for an important meeting at work; yet, the night before you were up late binge watching a TV series. You ended up waking up late the next morning and had to rush to work, leaving you flustered and not well prepared for the meeting. Did you really have to watch those TV series late into the night? Or could you have used that time for an early rest?

Or, what about  that time you had a deadline to meet, and you spent every night that week working late to complete the project. Did you really have to spend every night working late at the office? Or could you have prioritized your time better and gotten the project done during your typical work hours?

I’m sure we’re all guilty of not spending our time wisely at some point in our lives.

But let’s not focus on the time that has already been spent; instead, let’s look at how we can prioritize and leverage the time that we still have!

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How to Leverage Your Time

Going back to the age-old battle of Quantity versus Quality, which do you think matters more? What if I told you that you need not worry about how much time you have left–instead, focus on how you’re making use of the time that you do have so that it’s worth many more valuable moments in the future?

That’s right. You can easily multiply or invest in the time that you have now. This way, you’ll reap many more returns in the future, instead of merely spending time at present. And, one simple way of investing in time now–so that it becomes quality time– is to Prioritize.

I’m sure you’ve heard this before. It isn’t new. Yet, how many of us actually intentionally sit down to prioritize daily tasks and responsibilities? Even less likely, how many of us know a method that can help us effortlessly decide what is important enough to take up an hour of time, and what can be skipped?

Here’s an important skill I want to introduce to you:

Determine Value in Any Task or Action

Before you can decide on what to prioritize, you need to know just how important that action is.

Value is what you gain from an action that you take. It’s the benefit you’re getting in return for spending your time. Sometimes, the Value is immediate or short term; other times, it‘s only realized in the long term.

So when you invest in time, you’re actually creating future value for the time you put in now. Usually, the benefits are not immediate and will take time to manifest. But once they are realized, they are enjoyed over a long period of time.

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Reduce Time Expenditures

Time expenditure on the other hand, creates short term benefits at the cost of your current time. Usually, the benefits are quickly enjoyed, but are one-off. So once it’s done, it’s gone.

Whether you’re aware of it or not, your tasks are automatically prioritized by your brain. Some tasks can get you closer toward your goals, while others don’t really get you anywhere at all. Outside of work, most people seldom plan out their tasks deliberately, which allows  them be driven automatically.

This is where you end up feeling ‘busy’ all the time because some of the actions that you’re doing don’t necessarily align with what you want in the future. The consequence is that we spend a lot of our precious time on wasteful time expenditures, and far too little on time investments.

This causes a lot of people to be stuck in the same loop, day after day, month after month, year after year.

By simply determining the value of your daily actions or tasks, you’ll already be intentionally prioritizing at a much more efficient rate. This will not only reduce time expenditure, but increase time investments that you’ll be able to use in the near future for much more important areas in your life.

Let me paint you a scenario. Say you’re going on a week long vacation to Australia. It’s your first time travelling to Australia and there are so many activities you want to do, sights you want to see, and restaurants and eateries you’d like to visit .

All this research can get pretty overwhelming and you may not know where to even start! Do I book a hotel first? Or get my flights? But what if I decide on a specific  hotel and realize it’s far away from all the major attractions? Should I then look up what attractions I want to visit first? This list can go on!

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In order to not get overwhelmed or over plan your trip itinerary, here’s where Determining the Value of each action or task can help you Prioritize effortlessly.

Start with Your Intention

What is the purpose of this vacation? Once you know the purpose of this vacation, you’ll be able to list down a bunch of tasks or actions–such as booking a hotel, booking flights and land transport, booking tickets to certain attractions, making reservations for restaurants, etc.

Once you’ve compiled your list, the next step is simply to categorize them into 3 criteria:  

Must haves, Should haves, and Good to haves.

Must haves are tasks that are absolutely critical to achieve the objective, and should take top priority for resources and time.  

The Should haves are important but not critical; leaving them out may lessen the impact of your outcome.

And, the Good to haves are just optional. Not having them  won’t affect the outcome of your goal.

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Once you’re able to sort out your list according to these 3 criteria, you’re already one step closer to prioritizing effectively and spending quality time on those Must have tasks. And, this will be a game changer. You’ll be able to easily communicate what you are spending time on, and you’ll find that you have more time to spare because it’s crystal clear what’s worth skipping out on!

This can be applied to any aspect of your life, whether you’re a full-time working professional, stay at home parent, or working parent. If you’ve ever used the expression “I’ve been so busy” when talking to someone, then I’ll recommend you give this a shot.

Quantify Your Tasks

Now that you know how to determine the Value of your actions spent, the next step up to effective Prioritizing would be to quantify your tasks so that you can objectively decide which is more important. This is especially useful when you have multiple items within each Must have, Should have and Good to have criteria.

Quantifying your tasks by assigning a value will allow you to objectively see the importance, making it easy for you to know which task to work on first. This way, you can be assured that the time and effort that you’ve put into is quality.

Final Thoughts

Time management is only one piece of a bigger puzzle of change that you can go through, to turn your life around and find more fulfilment. Often, when you find yourself going through an obstacle or limitation in life, it’s not just because of one flaw or a one off decision you made.

It’s often a process and a result of many actions that resulted to where you are now, and so you should go deeper to reflect and see how things can be done differently.

Learn more time management tips:

Featured photo credit: Marten Bjork via unsplash.com

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