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7 Ways To Free Up Time and Declutter Your Day

7 Ways To Free Up Time and Declutter Your Day

I went through this phase where I couldn’t get a grip on anything. The harder I tried to simplify my lifestyle and free up time to, you know, breathe, the more complicated and cluttered it became. Sigh! I ended up stuck in that nauseating tilt-a-whirl where the beeping, buzzing, and ringing made me feel like everything was urgent. I couldn’t tell the difference between my priorities and the unimportant. What’s a girl to do?

If you’re like me, you’ll keep going until you drop – literally. You’ll burn yourself out so you’re too tired to screw up your life anymore. Or, if you’re smart you’ll free up time immediately and simplify your life using the tips below. (See what I did there?)

1. Step Away From The Chaos

The only way you’re going to free up time is by stepping back and looking at your life from an objective perspective. Ask yourself: Why do I do the things I do? How does each thing make me feel? What do I want to free up time for?

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Once you define how you really want to spend your time, it gives you a clear goal to strive for and keeps you motivated if you run into rough patches during the transition. Focus on one change at a time until your day feels as good as you look (rawr!)

2. Drop/Delegate What You Can

It’s amazing the number of things we do because we feel obligated to, not because we legitimately want to. Look through your entire list of obligations and categorize them:

  • Drop what you absolutely don’t want to do anymore. As difficult as it will be, your friends and family will have to deal with it.
  • For things you do enjoy but need to pause, put them on hiatus until further notice.
  • Delegate what still needs to get done but isn’t as important as…well, your priorities. Put your Type A personality on the back burner and see what you can transfer to someone else at work and at home.
  • For things you have to keep doing but eventually want to transition out of, put them on the outsource pile.

Tackle one task at a time – from easiest to more difficult – until your calendar is as clutter-free as possible.

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3. Batch Tasks Together

When you free up time you’re able to think mindfully. From this point on, you’ll be able to assess everything you want to do and decide the most time-effective way to get things done.

For example, I’m a big fan of batching tasks together at work and at home. I batch together each phase of the writing process – brainstorming, outlining, research, etc. – so I’m able to effectively work on each of my assignments. (As other writers already know, “outline brain” is totally different from “research brain,” though “need coffee brain” trumps them all!)

The same goes for my personal tasks: I batch all of my shopping or errands into one trip, I do my food prep for the following week in one shot, and so forth. It’s best to stay in one zone and stick to it until you’re done, and this is a great way to stay away from “multi-tasking brain,” which is always in denial.

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4. Eliminate Distractions

Do what you can to stay on track by eliminating distractions: get up earlier, only check your email at certain times, don’t read a text until you legitimately have time to, and put your phone on silent at night so you can actually unwind. Watch your television shows on the Internet so you can watch them at your own time and on your own terms.

Also, a larger coffee mug saves trips to the coffee maker. Just sayin’.

5. Define Boundaries

Instead of saying, “Yes,” to everything, start saying, “I’ll get back to you.” This will give you time to make an informed decision about every new request that comes your way – both professionally and personally. Once you’ve defined your time off, consider it as ironclad as a doctor’s appointment (so you don’t end up needing a doctor’s appointment!)

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6. Leave Your Days Off Blank

Do what you can to finish your work and errands during your work days and leave your days off as obligation-free as possible. There’s nothing more freeing than knowing you have an entire day to do what you feel compelled to do in the moment. It’s something your inner four-year-old will really appreciate.

7. Recap On A Regular Basis

It’s not like one day we say to ourselves, “Gee, I want to be so busy having time for bathroom breaks is like a vacation!” It’s a gradual build-up of I’d-love-tos and sure-why-nots that slip under the radar until we can’t remember the last time we did the laundry or washed our hair. Once you’ve successfully cut back your schedule to a level a human can handle, reassess weekly to make sure you don’t fall back into old habits.

What techniques have you used to free up time?

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Krissy Brady

A women's health & wellness writer with a short-term goal to leave women feeling a little more empowered and a little less verklempt.

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Last Updated on July 10, 2020

The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness

The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness

Life is wasted in the in-between times. The time between when your alarm first rings and when you finally decide to get out of bed. The time between when you sit at your desk and when productive work begins. The time between making a decision and doing something about it.

Slowly, your day is whittled away from all the unused in-between moments. Eventually, time wasters, laziness, and procrastination get the better of you.

The solution to reclaim these lost middle moments is by creating rituals. Every culture on earth uses rituals to transfer information and encode behaviors that are deemed important. Personal rituals can help you build a better pattern for handling everything from how you wake up to how you work.

Unfortunately, when most people see rituals, they see pointless superstitions. Indeed, many rituals are based on a primitive understanding of the world. But by building personal rituals, you get to encode the behaviors you feel are important and cut out the wasted middle moments.

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Program Your Own Algorithms

Another way of viewing rituals is by seeing them as computer algorithms. An algorithm is a set of instructions that is repeated to get a result.

Some algorithms are highly efficient, sorting or searching millions of pieces of data in a few seconds. Other algorithms are bulky and awkward, taking hours to do the same task.

By forming rituals, you are building algorithms for your behavior. Take the delayed and painful pattern of waking up, debating whether to sleep in for another two minutes, hitting the snooze button, repeat until almost late for work. This could be reprogrammed to get out of bed immediately, without debating your decision.

How to Form a Ritual

I’ve set up personal rituals for myself for handling e-mail, waking up each morning, writing articles, and reading books. Far from making me inflexible, these rituals give me a useful default pattern that works best 99% of the time. Whenever my current ritual won’t work, I’m always free to stop using it.

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Forming a ritual isn’t too difficult, and the same principles for changing habits apply:

  1. Write out your sequence of behavior. I suggest starting with a simple ritual of only 3-4 steps maximum. Wait until you’ve established a ritual before you try to add new steps.
  2. Commit to following your ritual for thirty days. This step will take the idea and condition it into your nervous system as a habit.
  3. Define a clear trigger. When does your ritual start? A ritual to wake up is easy—the sound of your alarm clock will work. As for what triggers you to go to the gym, read a book or answer e-mail—you’ll have to decide.
  4. Tweak the Pattern. Your algorithm probably won’t be perfectly efficient the first time. Making a few tweaks after the first 30-day trial can make your ritual more useful.

Ways to Use a Ritual

Based on the above ideas, here are some ways you could implement your own rituals:

1. Waking Up

Set up a morning ritual for when you wake up and the next few things you do immediately afterward. To combat the grogginess after immediately waking up, my solution is to do a few pushups right after getting out of bed. After that, I sneak in ninety minutes of reading before getting ready for morning classes.

2. Web Usage

How often do you answer e-mail, look at Google Reader, or check Facebook each day? I found by taking all my daily internet needs and compressing them into one, highly-efficient ritual, I was able to cut off 75% of my web time without losing any communication.

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3. Reading

How much time do you get to read books? If your library isn’t as large as you’d like, you might want to consider the rituals you use for reading. Programming a few steps to trigger yourself to read instead of watching television or during a break in your day can chew through dozens of books each year.

4. Friendliness

Rituals can also help with communication. Set up a ritual of starting a conversation when you have opportunities to meet people.

5. Working

One of the hardest barriers when overcoming procrastination is building up a concentrated flow. Building those steps into a ritual can allow you to quickly start working or continue working after an interruption.

6. Going to the gym

If exercising is a struggle, encoding a ritual can remove a lot of the difficulty. Set up a quick ritual for going to exercise right after work or when you wake up.

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7. Exercise

Even within your workouts, you can have rituals. Spacing the time between runs or reps with a certain number of breaths can remove the guesswork. Forming a ritual of doing certain exercises in a particular order can save time.

8. Sleeping

Form a calming ritual in the last 30-60 minutes of your day before you go to bed. This will help slow yourself down and make falling asleep much easier. Especially if you plan to get up full of energy in the morning, it will help if you remove insomnia.

8. Weekly Reviews

The weekly review is a big part of the GTD system. By making a simple ritual checklist for my weekly review, I can get the most out of this exercise in less time. Originally, I did holistic reviews where I wrote my thoughts on the week and progress as a whole. Now, I narrow my focus toward specific plans, ideas, and measurements.

Final Thoughts

We all want to be productive. But time wasters, procrastination, and laziness sometimes get the better of us. If you’re facing such difficulties, don’t be afraid to make use of these rituals to help you conquer them.

More Tips to Conquer Time Wasters and Procrastination

 

Featured photo credit: RODOLFO BARRETO via unsplash.com

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