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52 Inspiring Quotes for Aspiring Leaders

52 Inspiring Quotes for Aspiring Leaders

Whether you’re looking to grow your library of quotes or looking to push that last hour of work in the office, these quotes will help. I have hand-picked them in order to give you the best possible impact. These have inspired the masses over the years, and I wish you the best in reaching your goal of being part of the next generation of aspiring leaders.

1. “Lead me, follow me, or get out of my way.”

—George Patton, General

2. “A leader is a dealer in hope.”

—Napolean Bonaparte

3. “You don’t need a title to be a leader.”

—Mark Sanborn

4. “To command is to serve, nothing more and nothing less.”

—Andre Malraux

5. “The greatest artists like Dylan, Picasso and Newton risked failure. And if we want to be great, we’ve got to risk it too.”

—Steve Jobs

6. “A ruler should be slow to punish and swift to reward.”

—Ovid

7. “Leadership is influence.”

—John C. Maxwell

8. “To do great things is difficult; but to command great things is more difficult.”

—Friedrich Nietzsche

9. “Leadership is unlocking people’s potential to become better.”

—Bill Bradley

10. “Earn your leadership every day”

—Michael Jordan

11. “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.”

—John F. Kennedy

12. “To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart.”

—Eleanor Roosevelt

13. “He who cannot be a good follower cannot be a good leader.”

—Aristotle

14. “Effective leadership is putting first things first. Effective management is discipline, carrying it out.”

—Stephen Covey

15. “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself, or to get all the credit for doing it.”

—Andrew Carnegie

16. “You do not lead by hitting people over the head—that’s assault, not leadership.”

—Dwight D. Eisenhower

17. “Don’t follow the crowd, let the crowd follow you.”

—Margaret Thatcher

18. “I cannot trust a man to control others who cannot control himself.”

—Robert E. Lee

19. “Some leaders are born women.”

—Geraldine Ferraro

20. “In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.”

—Sheryl Sandberg

21. “Be with a leader when he is right, stay with him when he is still right, but, leave him when he is wrong.”

—Abraham Lincoln

22. “We’re here for a reason. I believe a bit of the reason is to throw little torches out to lead people through the dark.”

—Whoopi Goldberg

23.“The art of leadership is saying no, not yes. It is very easy to say yes.”

—Tony Blair

24. “Together we are better.”

—John Paul Warren

25. “The task of the leader is to get his people from where they are to where they have not been. ”

—Henry Kissinger 

26. “I must follow the people. Am I not their leader?”

—Benjamin Disraeli

27. “Every great leader can take you back to a defining moment when they decided to lead.”

—John Paul Warren

28. “When you accept a leadership role, you take on extra responsibility for your actions toward others.”

—Kelley Armstrong

29. “Sheep are always looking for a new shepherd when the terrain gets rocky.”

—Karen Marie Moning

30. “I would not be a Moses to lead you into the Promised Land, because if I could lead you into it, someone else could lead you out of it.”

—Eugene V. Debs 

31. “Too many kings can ruin an army.”

—Homer

32. “There are two kinds of leaders, cowboys and Shepherds. Cowboys drive and Shepherds lead.”

—John Paul Warren

33. “When eagles are silent, parrots begin to chatter.”

—Winston Churchill

34. “Stories are the single most powerful weapon in a leader’s arsenal.”

—Howard Gardner

35. “Leadership is a two-way street, loyalty up and loyalty down.”

—Grace Murray Hopper  

36. “The power to lead is the power to mislead, and the power to mislead is the power to destroy.”

—Thomas Monson

37. “It’s not about you. It’s about them.”

—Clint Eastwood

38. “Leadership is the art of giving people a platform for spreading ideas that work.”

—Seth Godin

39. “Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.”

—Norman Schwarzkopf

40. “Successful leaders see the opportunities in every difficulty rather than the difficulty in every opportunity.”

—Reed Markham 

41. “If you want people to to think, give them intent, not instruction.”

—David Marquet

42. “How was your day? If your answer was ‘fine,’ then I don’t think you were leading.”

—Seth Godin

43. “Dominate in your domain; You can do it.”

—Jaachynma Agu

44. “Our greatest limitation isn’t the leader of the lives; it is the spirit within us.”

—John MacArthur

45. “Winners see the dream and develop plans while the rest see the obstacles and develop justifications.”

—Orrin Woodward 

46. “One mark of a good officer, he remembered, was the ability to make quick decisions. If they happen to be right, so much the better.”

—Larry Niven

47. “Some are born leaders, some achieve leadership, and some have leadership thrust upon them. Which of these are you, or would you rather not bother?”

—Maurice Flanagan

48. “Any man who has ever led an army, an expedition, or a group of Boy Scouts has sadism in his bones.”

—Tahir Shah

49. “Engage the enemy more closely.”

—Charles Faddis

50. “One of the fundamental aspects of leadership, I realized more and more, is the ability to instill confidence in others when you yourself are feeling insecure.”

—Howard Schultz 

51. “Finally, the president added, ‘The American people are idealists, but they also want their leaders to be realistic…’”

—Bob Woodward

52. “There’s no such thing as a superhero, but together we can world in a new direction.”

—Biz Stone

I hope these help and support your missions to success!

Featured photo credit: Piotr Kwiatkowski via unsplash.com

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Last Updated on September 30, 2020

Effective vs Efficient: What’s the Difference Regarding Productivity?

Effective vs Efficient: What’s the Difference Regarding Productivity?

When it comes to being effective vs efficient, there are a lot of similarities, and because of this, they’re often misused and misinterpreted, both in daily use and application.

Every business should look for new ways to improve employee effectiveness and efficiency to save time and energy in the long term. Just because a company or employee has one, however, doesn’t necessarily mean that the other is equally present.

Utilizing both an effective and efficient methodology in nearly any capacity of work and life will yield high levels of productivity, while a lack of it will lead to a lack of positive results.

Before we discuss the various nuances between the word effective and efficient and how they factor into productivity, let’s break things down with a definition of their terms.

Effective vs Efficient

Effective is defined as “producing a decided, decisive, or desired effect.” Meanwhile, the word “efficient ” is defined as “capable of producing desired results with little or no waste (as of time or materials).”[1]

A rather simple way of explaining the differences between the two would be to consider a light bulb. Say that your porch light burned out and you decided that you wanted to replace the incandescent light bulb outside with an LED one. Either light bulb would be effective in accomplishing the goal of providing you with light at night, but the LED one would use less energy and therefore be the more efficient choice.

Now, if you incorrectly set a timer for the light, and it was turned on throughout the entire day, then you would be wasting energy. While the bulb is still performing the task of creating light in an efficient manner, it’s on during the wrong time of day and therefore not effective.

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The effective way is focused on accomplishing the goal, while the efficient method is focused on the best way of accomplishing the goal.

Whether we’re talking about a method, employee, or business, the subject in question can be either effective or efficient, or, in rare instances, they can be both.

When it comes to effective vs efficient, the goal of achieving maximum productivity is going to be a combination where the subject is effective and as efficient as possible in doing so.

Effectiveness in Success and Productivity

Being effective vs efficient is all about doing something that brings about the desired intent or effect[2]. If a pest control company is hired to rid a building’s infestation, and they employ “method A” and successfully completed the job, they’ve been effective at achieving the task.

The task was performed correctly, to the extent that the pest control company did what they were hired to do. As for how efficient “method A” was in completing the task, that’s another story.

If the pest control company took longer than expected to complete the job and used more resources than needed, then their efficiency in completing the task wasn’t particularly good. The client may feel that even though the job was completed, the value in the service wasn’t up to par.

When assessing the effectiveness of any business strategy, it’s wise to ask certain questions before moving forward:

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  • Has a target solution to the problem been identified?
  • What is the ideal response time for achieving the goal?
  • Does the cost balance out with the benefit?

Looking at these questions, a leader should ask to what extent a method, tool, or resource meets the above criteria and achieve the desired effect. If the subject in question doesn’t hit any of these marks, then productivity will likely suffer.

Efficiency in Success and Productivity

Efficiency is going to account for the resources and materials used in relation to the value of achieving the desired effect. Money, people, inventory, and (perhaps most importantly) time, all factor into the equation.

When it comes to being effective vs efficient, efficiency can be measured in numerous ways[3]. In general, the business that uses fewer materials or that is able to save time is going to be more efficient and have an advantage over the competition. This is assuming that they’re also effective, of course.

Consider a sales team for example. Let’s say that a company’s sales team is tasked with making 100 calls a week and that the members of that team are hitting their goal each week without any struggle.

The members on the sales team are effective in hitting their goal. However, the question of efficiency comes into play when management looks at how many of those calls turn into solid connections and closed deals.

If less than 10 percent of those calls generate a connection, the productivity is relatively low because the efficiency is not adequately balancing out with the effect. Management can either keep the same strategy or take a new approach.

Perhaps they break up their sales team with certain members handling different parts of the sales process, or they explore a better way of connecting with their customers through a communications company.

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The goal is ultimately going to be finding the right balance, where they’re being efficient with the resources they have to maximize their sales goals without stretching themselves too thin. Finding this balance is often easier said than done, but it’s incredibly important for any business that is going to thrive.

Combining Efficiency and Effectiveness to Maximize Productivity

Being effective vs efficient works best if both are pulled together for the best results.

If a business is ineffective in accomplishing its overall goal, and the customer doesn’t feel that the service is equated with the cost, then efficiency becomes largely irrelevant. The business may be speedy and use minimal resources, but they struggle to be effective. This may put them at risk of going under.

It’s for this reason that it’s best to shoot for being effective first, and then work on bringing efficiency into practice.

Improving productivity starts with taking the initiative to look at how effective a company, employee, or method is through performance reviews. Leaders should make a point to regularly examine performance at all levels on a whole, and take into account the results that are being generated.

Businesses and employees often succumb to inefficiency because they don’t look for a better way, or they lack the proper tools to be effective in the most efficient manner possible.

Similar to improving a manager or employee’s level of effectiveness, regularly measuring the resources needed to obtain the desired effect will ensure that efficiency is being accounted for. This involves everything from keeping track of inventory and expenses, to how communication is handled within an organization.

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By putting in place a baseline value for key metrics and checking them once changes have been made, a company will have a much better idea of the results they’re generating.

It’s no doubt a step-by-step process. By making concentrated efforts, weakness can be identified and rectified sooner rather than later when the damage is already done.

Bottom Line

Understanding the differences between being effective vs efficient is key when it comes to maximizing productivity. It’s simply working smart so that the intended results are achieved in the best way possible. Finding the optimal balance should be the ultimate goal for employees and businesses:

  • Take the steps that result in meeting the solution.
  • Review the process and figure out how to do it better.
  • Repeat the process with what has been learned in a more efficient manner.

And just like that, effective and efficient productivity is maximized.

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Featured photo credit: Tim van der Kuip via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Merriam-Webster: effective and efficient
[2] Mind Tools: Being Effective at Work
[3] Inc.: 8 Things Really Efficient People Do

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