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52 Inspiring Quotes for Aspiring Leaders

52 Inspiring Quotes for Aspiring Leaders

Whether you’re looking to grow your library of quotes or looking to push that last hour of work in the office, these quotes will help. I have hand-picked them in order to give you the best possible impact. These have inspired the masses over the years, and I wish you the best in reaching your goal of being part of the next generation of aspiring leaders.

1. “Lead me, follow me, or get out of my way.”

—George Patton, General

2. “A leader is a dealer in hope.”

—Napolean Bonaparte

3. “You don’t need a title to be a leader.”

—Mark Sanborn

4. “To command is to serve, nothing more and nothing less.”

—Andre Malraux

5. “The greatest artists like Dylan, Picasso and Newton risked failure. And if we want to be great, we’ve got to risk it too.”

—Steve Jobs

6. “A ruler should be slow to punish and swift to reward.”

—Ovid

7. “Leadership is influence.”

—John C. Maxwell

8. “To do great things is difficult; but to command great things is more difficult.”

—Friedrich Nietzsche

9. “Leadership is unlocking people’s potential to become better.”

—Bill Bradley

10. “Earn your leadership every day”

—Michael Jordan

11. “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.”

—John F. Kennedy

12. “To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart.”

—Eleanor Roosevelt

13. “He who cannot be a good follower cannot be a good leader.”

—Aristotle

14. “Effective leadership is putting first things first. Effective management is discipline, carrying it out.”

—Stephen Covey

15. “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself, or to get all the credit for doing it.”

—Andrew Carnegie

16. “You do not lead by hitting people over the head—that’s assault, not leadership.”

—Dwight D. Eisenhower

17. “Don’t follow the crowd, let the crowd follow you.”

—Margaret Thatcher

18. “I cannot trust a man to control others who cannot control himself.”

—Robert E. Lee

19. “Some leaders are born women.”

—Geraldine Ferraro

20. “In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.”

—Sheryl Sandberg

21. “Be with a leader when he is right, stay with him when he is still right, but, leave him when he is wrong.”

—Abraham Lincoln

22. “We’re here for a reason. I believe a bit of the reason is to throw little torches out to lead people through the dark.”

—Whoopi Goldberg

23.“The art of leadership is saying no, not yes. It is very easy to say yes.”

—Tony Blair

24. “Together we are better.”

—John Paul Warren

25. “The task of the leader is to get his people from where they are to where they have not been. ”

—Henry Kissinger 

26. “I must follow the people. Am I not their leader?”

—Benjamin Disraeli

27. “Every great leader can take you back to a defining moment when they decided to lead.”

—John Paul Warren

28. “When you accept a leadership role, you take on extra responsibility for your actions toward others.”

—Kelley Armstrong

29. “Sheep are always looking for a new shepherd when the terrain gets rocky.”

—Karen Marie Moning

30. “I would not be a Moses to lead you into the Promised Land, because if I could lead you into it, someone else could lead you out of it.”

—Eugene V. Debs 

31. “Too many kings can ruin an army.”

—Homer

32. “There are two kinds of leaders, cowboys and Shepherds. Cowboys drive and Shepherds lead.”

—John Paul Warren

33. “When eagles are silent, parrots begin to chatter.”

—Winston Churchill

34. “Stories are the single most powerful weapon in a leader’s arsenal.”

—Howard Gardner

35. “Leadership is a two-way street, loyalty up and loyalty down.”

—Grace Murray Hopper  

36. “The power to lead is the power to mislead, and the power to mislead is the power to destroy.”

—Thomas Monson

37. “It’s not about you. It’s about them.”

—Clint Eastwood

38. “Leadership is the art of giving people a platform for spreading ideas that work.”

—Seth Godin

39. “Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.”

—Norman Schwarzkopf

40. “Successful leaders see the opportunities in every difficulty rather than the difficulty in every opportunity.”

—Reed Markham 

41. “If you want people to to think, give them intent, not instruction.”

—David Marquet

42. “How was your day? If your answer was ‘fine,’ then I don’t think you were leading.”

—Seth Godin

43. “Dominate in your domain; You can do it.”

—Jaachynma Agu

44. “Our greatest limitation isn’t the leader of the lives; it is the spirit within us.”

—John MacArthur

45. “Winners see the dream and develop plans while the rest see the obstacles and develop justifications.”

—Orrin Woodward 

46. “One mark of a good officer, he remembered, was the ability to make quick decisions. If they happen to be right, so much the better.”

—Larry Niven

47. “Some are born leaders, some achieve leadership, and some have leadership thrust upon them. Which of these are you, or would you rather not bother?”

—Maurice Flanagan

48. “Any man who has ever led an army, an expedition, or a group of Boy Scouts has sadism in his bones.”

—Tahir Shah

49. “Engage the enemy more closely.”

—Charles Faddis

50. “One of the fundamental aspects of leadership, I realized more and more, is the ability to instill confidence in others when you yourself are feeling insecure.”

—Howard Schultz 

51. “Finally, the president added, ‘The American people are idealists, but they also want their leaders to be realistic…’”

—Bob Woodward

52. “There’s no such thing as a superhero, but together we can world in a new direction.”

—Biz Stone

I hope these help and support your missions to success!

Featured photo credit: Piotr Kwiatkowski via unsplash.com

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Bristol is the most congested city in England. Whenever I have to work at the office, I ride there, like most of us do. Furthermore, I always make sure to go at off hours; otherwise, the roads are jam-packed with cars, buses, bikes, even pedestrians. Why is that? Because everyone is working a traditional 9 to 5 work day.

Where did the “9 to 5” Come From?

It all started back in 1946. The United States government implemented the 40 hour work week for all federal employees, and all companies adopted the practice afterwards. That’s 67 years with the same schedule. Let’s think about all the things that have changed in the 67 years:

  • We went to the moon, and astronauts now live in space on the ISS.

  • Computers used to take up entire rooms and took hours to make a single calculation. Now we have more powerful computers in our purses and back pockets with our smartphones.

  • Lots of employees can now telecommute to the office from hundreds, and even thousands of miles away.

In 1946 a 9-5 job made sense because we had time after 5pm for a social life, a family life. Now we’re constantly connected to other people and the office, with the Internet, email on our smartphones, and hashtags in our movies and television shows. There is no downtime anymore.

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Different Folks, Different Strokes

Enjoying your downtime is an important part of life. It recharges your batteries and lets you be more productive. Allowing people to balance life and work can provide them with much needed perspective and motivation to see the bigger picture of what they are trying to achieve.

Some people are just more productive when they’re working at their optimal time of day, after feeling well rested and personally fulfilled.  For some that can be  from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m; for others, it could be  2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

People have their own rhythms and routines. It would be great if we could sync our work schedule to match. Simply put, the imposed 8-hour work day can be a creativity and morale killer for the average person in today’s world.

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Productivity and Trust Killer

Fostering creativity among employees is not always an easy endeavor, but perhaps a good place to start is by simply not tying their tasks and goals to a fixed time period. Let them work on their to-do list at their own pace, and chances are, you’ll get the best out of your employee who feels empowered instead of babysat.

That’s not to say that you should  allow your team to run wild and do whatever they want, but restricting them to a 9 to 5 time frame can quickly demoralize people. Set parameters and deadlines, and let them work at their own creative best with the understanding that their work is crucial to the functioning of the entire team.

Margaret Heffernan, an entrepreneur who previously worked in broadcasting, noted to Inc that from her experience, “treating employees like grown-ups made it more likely that they would behave the same way.” The principle here is to have your employees work to get things done, not to just follow the hands on the clock.

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A Flexible Remote Working Policy

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer famously recalled all her remote workers, saying she wanted to improve innovation and collaboration, but was that the right decision? We’ve all said that we’re often more productive in a half day working from home than a full day working in the office, right? So why not let your employees work remotely from home?

There are definitely varying schools of thought on remote working. Some believe that innovation and collaboration can only happen in a boardroom with markers, whiteboards and post-it notes and of course, this can be true for some. But do a few great brainstorms trump a team that feels a little less stressed and a little more free?

Those who champion remote working often note that these employees are not counting the clock, worried about getting home, cooking dinner or rushing through errands post-work. No one works their 9-5 straight without breaks here and there.  Allowing some time for remote working means employees can handle some non-work related tasks and feel more accomplished throughout the day. Also, sometimes we all need to have a taste of working in our pajamas, right?

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It’ll be interesting to see how many traditional companies and industries start giving their employees more freedom with their work schedule. And how many end up rescinding their policies like Yahoo did.

What are your thoughts of the traditional 9-5 schedule and what are you doing to help foster your team’s productivity and creativity? Hit the comments and let us know.

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