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15 Things Really Successful People Do Often

15 Things Really Successful People Do Often
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We all perceive and appreciate extraordinary people around us, who are heroically successful at what they do; particularly people who experience repetitive success in many areas all through their lifetime. We all have our own models of great and successful people, whom we appreciate and admire. There are many reasons that influence success; some of them have conferred their favorite habits or have acknowledged their own actions to reach their goals.

The point to be considered here is most of them were not born into success; they worked hard, they learned and they simply and continuously did things successfully. Here are 15 things successful people often do differently that helps them realize their full potential and the rest of us can easily follow.

1. They trust their creative side

The world’s most successful people always have one thing in common that make them unique: they think differently from others. They trust and understand how their creative mind works; they embrace uncertainty, and they don’t fear failure. Successful people use their creativity to sort through a mass of ideas to discover the ones that fit into a situation—that support the condition—which is a very difficult task which makes them exceptional.

2. They think bigger

Successful people think bigger and they can see the big-picture to predict the future. They are able to predict how the market will change based on present measures.

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3. They plan ahead

Successful people are disciplined when it comes to planning ahead. They believe if someone is not planning for the future, then he must plan to fail. Successful people follow this philosophy and set targets to challenge themselves and the people who work for them.

4. They have fun

Successful people look for what is essential or fun; they make room for activities that balance their work and life. Those who have fun at work, who enjoy while performing their tasks, draw success to them. You can only understand the true satisfaction and joy in your life, if you have learned to have fun.

5. They are not afraid to quit

Successful people never give up on their tasks or dreams, but they always try and admit mistakes and take away lessons to make future projects more successful.

6. They enjoy the ups and downs

Prosperous individuals see life as being occupied with many exhilarating twists and turns. Successful people are brave enough to take risks, face challenges and be hungry to find success in their life.

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7. They take real action

ACTION is THE KEY to SUCCESS. To be successful one needs to be proactive. The most successful people in life are devoted to taking actions in a steady, constant basis. Successful tycoons make decisions fast and act on them just as quickly, instead of sitting on the boundary, trying to make a decision, hoping that the best answer will appear itself.

8. They measure progress

The most successful entrepreneurs use logical systems for measuring the progress of a goal. By measuring progress, they stay on track; they reach their target, and experience the excitement of triumph that spurs them to reach their goals.

9. They work outside of their comfort zone

Substantial moments of opportunity for individual growth and success will swing in your life. Successful people are always looking forward to make constructive changes and new innovations in their life; they embrace these instants of opportunity.

10. They keep things simple

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” Leonardo da Vinci

Successful people choose something that’s doable. If something doesn’t work out, they learn from the experience, pick something else and move forward.

11. They focus on continuous improvements

Successful people make a plan while selecting an activity to deal with troubles when they arise. As their strength grows, they take on higher challenges.

12. They learn from mistakes

To be a successful person, focus on the positives – successful people look for the silver lining in all situations. They recognize their positivity will lead them to greatness.

13. They spend time with the right people

Successful people subordinate with people who are compatible, attentive and loyal. They hang out with people who create spirit and connect with persuasive people who are eager for their dreams and goals.

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14. They don’t rely on luck

Superstitious people relate success to being in the right place at the right time. Whereas this is a component of achievement, there’s also the key contributions of blood, sweat and tears. Remember, don’t wait for the perfect timing or indication. Some of the most successful people thrived, even if the timing wasn’t impeccable.

15. They are flexible

Plans, strategies or tactics might change. Successful people move with the strokes. Instead of getting upset and frustrated, they quickly move in another direction.

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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