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15 Things Really Successful People Do Often

15 Things Really Successful People Do Often

We all perceive and appreciate extraordinary people around us, who are heroically successful at what they do; particularly people who experience repetitive success in many areas all through their lifetime. We all have our own models of great and successful people, whom we appreciate and admire. There are many reasons that influence success; some of them have conferred their favorite habits or have acknowledged their own actions to reach their goals.

The point to be considered here is most of them were not born into success; they worked hard, they learned and they simply and continuously did things successfully. Here are 15 things successful people often do differently that helps them realize their full potential and the rest of us can easily follow.

1. They trust their creative side

The world’s most successful people always have one thing in common that make them unique: they think differently from others. They trust and understand how their creative mind works; they embrace uncertainty, and they don’t fear failure. Successful people use their creativity to sort through a mass of ideas to discover the ones that fit into a situation—that support the condition—which is a very difficult task which makes them exceptional.

2. They think bigger

Successful people think bigger and they can see the big-picture to predict the future. They are able to predict how the market will change based on present measures.

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3. They plan ahead

Successful people are disciplined when it comes to planning ahead. They believe if someone is not planning for the future, then he must plan to fail. Successful people follow this philosophy and set targets to challenge themselves and the people who work for them.

4. They have fun

Successful people look for what is essential or fun; they make room for activities that balance their work and life. Those who have fun at work, who enjoy while performing their tasks, draw success to them. You can only understand the true satisfaction and joy in your life, if you have learned to have fun.

5. They are not afraid to quit

Successful people never give up on their tasks or dreams, but they always try and admit mistakes and take away lessons to make future projects more successful.

6. They enjoy the ups and downs

Prosperous individuals see life as being occupied with many exhilarating twists and turns. Successful people are brave enough to take risks, face challenges and be hungry to find success in their life.

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7. They take real action

ACTION is THE KEY to SUCCESS. To be successful one needs to be proactive. The most successful people in life are devoted to taking actions in a steady, constant basis. Successful tycoons make decisions fast and act on them just as quickly, instead of sitting on the boundary, trying to make a decision, hoping that the best answer will appear itself.

8. They measure progress

The most successful entrepreneurs use logical systems for measuring the progress of a goal. By measuring progress, they stay on track; they reach their target, and experience the excitement of triumph that spurs them to reach their goals.

9. They work outside of their comfort zone

Substantial moments of opportunity for individual growth and success will swing in your life. Successful people are always looking forward to make constructive changes and new innovations in their life; they embrace these instants of opportunity.

10. They keep things simple

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” Leonardo da Vinci

Successful people choose something that’s doable. If something doesn’t work out, they learn from the experience, pick something else and move forward.

11. They focus on continuous improvements

Successful people make a plan while selecting an activity to deal with troubles when they arise. As their strength grows, they take on higher challenges.

12. They learn from mistakes

To be a successful person, focus on the positives – successful people look for the silver lining in all situations. They recognize their positivity will lead them to greatness.

13. They spend time with the right people

Successful people subordinate with people who are compatible, attentive and loyal. They hang out with people who create spirit and connect with persuasive people who are eager for their dreams and goals.

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14. They don’t rely on luck

Superstitious people relate success to being in the right place at the right time. Whereas this is a component of achievement, there’s also the key contributions of blood, sweat and tears. Remember, don’t wait for the perfect timing or indication. Some of the most successful people thrived, even if the timing wasn’t impeccable.

15. They are flexible

Plans, strategies or tactics might change. Successful people move with the strokes. Instead of getting upset and frustrated, they quickly move in another direction.

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Published on July 17, 2018

How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done

How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done

I’ve never believed people are born productive or organized. Being organized and productive is a choice.

You choose to keep your stuff organized or you don’t. You choose to get on with your work and ignore distractions or you don’t.

But one skill very productive people appear to have that is not a choice is the ability to compartmentalize. And that takes skill and practice.

What is compartmentalization

To compartmentalize means you have the ability to shut out all distractions and other work except for the work in front of you. Nothing gets past your barriers.

In psychology, compartmentalization is a defence mechanism our brains use to shut out traumatic events. We close down all thoughts about the traumatic event. This can lead to serious mental-health problems such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if not dealt with properly.

However, compartmentalization can be used in positive ways to help us become more productive and allow us to focus on the things that are important to us.

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Robin Sharma, the renowned leadership coach, calls it his Tight Bubble of Total Focus Strategy. This is where he shuts out all distractions, turns off his phone and goes to a quiet place where no one will disturb him and does the work he wants to focus on. He allows nothing to come between himself and the work he is working on and prides himself on being almost uncontactable.

Others call it deep work. When I want to focus on a specific piece of work, I turn everything off, turn on my favourite music podcast The Anjunadeep Edition (soft, eclectic electronic music) and focus on the content I intend to work on. It works, and it allows me to get massive amounts of content produced every week.

The main point about compartmentalization is that no matter what else is going on in your life — you could be going through a difficult time in your relationships, your business could be sinking into bankruptcy or you just had a fight with your colleague; you can shut those things out of your mind and focus totally on the work that needs doing.

Your mind sees things as separate rooms with closable doors, so you can enter a mental room, close the door and have complete focus on whatever it is you want to focus on. Your mind does not wander.

Being able to achieve this state can seriously boost your productivity. You get a lot more quality work done and you find you have a lot more time to do the things you want to do. It is a skill worth mastering for the benefits it will bring you.

How to develop the skill of compartmentalization

The simplest way to develop this skill is to use your calendar.

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Your calendar is the most powerful tool you have in your productivity toolbox. It allows you to block time out, and it can focus you on the work that needs doing.

My calendar allows me to block time out so I can remove everything else out of my mind to focus on one thing. When I have scheduled time for writing, I know what I want to write about and I sit down and my mind completely focuses on the writing.

Nothing comes between me, my thoughts and the keyboard. I am in my writing compartment and that is where I want to be. Anything going on around me, such as a problem with a student, a difficulty with an area of my business or an argument with my wife is blocked out.

Understand that sometimes there’s nothing you can do about an issue

One of the ways to do this is to understand there are times when there is nothing you can do about an issue or an area of your life. For example, if I have a student with a problem, unless I am able to communicate with that student at that specific time, there is nothing I can do about it.

If I can help the student, I would schedule a meeting with the student to help them. But between now and the scheduled meeting there is nothing I can do. So, I block it out.

The meeting is scheduled on my calendar and I will be there. Until then, there is nothing I can do about it.

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Ask yourself the question “Is there anything I can do about it right now?”

This is a very powerful way to help you compartmentalize these issues.

If there is, focus all your attention on it to the exclusion of everything else until you have a workable solution. If not, then block it out, schedule time when you can do something about it and move on to the next piece of work you need to work on.

Being able to compartmentalize helps with productivity in another way. It reduces the amount of time you spend worrying.

Worrying about something is a huge waste of energy that never solves anything. Being able to block out issues you cannot deal with stops you from worrying about things and allows you to focus on the things you can do something about.

Reframe the problem as a question

Reframing the problem as a question such as “what do I have to do to solve this problem?” takes your mind away from a worried state into a solution state, where you begin searching for solutions.

One of the reasons David Allen’s Getting Things Done book has endured is because it focuses on contexts. This is a form of compartmentalization where you only do work you can work on.

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For instance, if a piece of work needs a computer, you would only look at the work when you were in front of a computer. If you were driving, you cannot do that work, so you would not be looking at it.

Choose one thing to focus on

To get better at compartmentalizing, look around your environment and seek out places where you can do specific types of work.

Taking your dog for a walk could be the time you focus solely on solving project problems, commuting to and from work could be the time you spend reading and developing your skills and the time between 10 am and 12 pm could be the time you spend on the phone sorting out client issues.

Once you make the decision about when and where you will do the different types of work, make it stick. Schedule it. Once it becomes a habit, you are well on your way to using the power of compartmentalization to become more productive.

Comparmentalization saves you stress

Compartmentalization is a skill that gives you time to deal with issues and work to the exclusion of all other distractions.

This means you get more work done in less time and this allows you to spend more time with the people you want to spend more time with, doing the things you want to spend more time doing.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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