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15 Reasons Why You Are Still Nowhere Near Success

15 Reasons Why You Are Still Nowhere Near Success

There are a plethora of materials available that teach you how to be successful. They delve into depth on the ins-and-out and the “formula” of success. If you have never heard of the word, “success”, a quick search on the internet and a mere half-and-hour will enlighten you.

However, having a thorough understanding of what it takes to be successful does not lay a solid foundation for your ambitions. Knowing how to do something does not necessarily imply you know how to not do something. Understanding the light inevitably makes you understand the darkness. The darkness being why you lag behind success.

1. You believe you are entitled

Sadly, a plethora of people truly believe they deserve to have what they desire handed to them. Unfortunately, for many, this is not the case. Nothing in life is ever given, it is earned.  The most successful people, in whatever lens you want to view it, worked to have what they got.  The people who have inherent riches and companies must also learn the ropes of their role – quite often, they’re taught from a young age; hence, they still worked for what they had even though they’re an heir.  Letting go of this sense of “entitlement” is the first step to real success.

2. You put it all on social media

With the advent of social media, many believe it is the key to their visions. Social media does not equal riches, fame or a pleasurable lifestyle. Social media is neither free (but that’s beyond the scope of the article) because you need to spend many hours to make an impact in the highly saturated market and doesn’t guarantee income for your business. It is a tool to be utilized, not the key to your success.

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3. You are riddled with fear

Quite clearly, this is a major cause and one that is often denied by so many people.  The fear of failure and being unable to reach their goal is enough to stop them in their tracks. People tend to consider all things that could go wrong with their vision. While it is important to understand what could, and might, go wrong – never delve on it.  Instead, focus on the things that could go right and allow that to drive you.

4. You lack belief

How much do you believe? This is the killer question that determines you’re on the right path or not. Not a single soul is going to believe in your ambition if you do not believe yourself. Who would want to risk in your failure, mistakes and all the undesirables that will probably occur on your journey if you don’t care enough. Believe and others will also believe in you.

5. You think about death

Any one of us could die any day. You could die after reading this article, and hey, I could die before finishing it. Tomorrow could be your last or a decade from now – no one knows However, If you live with this carcinogenic thought, you will never get anywhere. Do not allow the fear of death to prevent you to strive for what you desire.  Death can come anytime – use it as a motivator to make everyday count towards achieving your goal.

6. You believe you will lose everything

Quite legitimately, you may have already succeed at another ambition in your life. You’re living quite comfortably but another idea has come in mind. What’s stopping you? Your previous success might be your hindrance.  This new ambition of yours seems like it could quite possibly destroy everything you’ve built – causing you to lag behind success. This is a legitimate fear. You truly need to decide if your new vision is worth risking everything you have – some things just aren’t worth losing.

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7. You think you have reached your limit

Many of us believe we have hit our limit. That we can’t progress any further in what we already have. But there isn’t a limit to what a human being can achieve, to what you can achieve. The stars are not the limit and you haven’t hit your limit because there is no limit.

8. You have lack of clarity

Looking into the future with a cloudy lens is a contributor to why you’re lagging behind success.  Though you have a vision, it can be difficult to realize if what you’re doing is “the right thing.”  Understand whether you are on the path that is most fulfilling is a difficult one to determine but you have to sit down with yourself and achieve clarity with your goals and what it is you’re trying to accomplish.

9. You think you are not educated

I often hear people to tell that are not educated enough to succeed in their ambition. They believe they lag behind because they do not know enough. The most ambitious people do not necessarily have university degrees under their belt nor a network of academics to lend them a hand. Education is self-taught, at its best, not spoon-fed or ordained.

10. You believe you are in “awful” health

How often have you blamed ill health for your lack of vision? Perhaps you think you have a learning, speaking, visual or audial deficiency. Maybe you contract too many colds to work in the environment you’d like to work in. Truly speaking, ill health is never a good reason to stop your ambition. That is, of-course, you’re on your death bed though heaven forbid. Health can definitely lag the process of success, yet it is not a reason to completely stop as your “reason” for not pursuing your vision. Use common sense when determining how serious your health illness is before concluding you cannot achieve your ambition.

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11. You are not the right age

Age is not a factor in determining what you can and cannot do. A person cannot be too old or too young to achieve what they desire. The factor that is stopping you is your thought process. Quite frankly, you can take advantage of your age to shock and gather the attention of others. For example, a young public speaker or an elderly body builder will promptly gather the attention of many with little effort. Age should not be a reason for your failure.

12. You are too cautious

It’s important to be careful and not flamboyant, yet that can become obsessive. Being too careful is just as dangerous as being careless. There is no need to be highly calculating and analytic when, quite often, a little risk is all that’s needed. Nothing in life is ever too certain. Spending all your time being cautious will hinder your growth – and your success.

13. You don’t have a good support group

Having the wrong people around you can hinder you from realizing your vision. They can give up, stop trying, become distracted, put you down and more. Negative friends and supportive family members can destroy everything you’ve worked for and believed in from the very beginning. Surrounding yourself with supportive and positive people, including the people you choose to work with, will boost your confidence and in turn, boost your success.

14. You have an enormous ego

Being filled within yourself is detrimental to growth. By believing and thinking you are the end-all and be-all of everything will kill any possibility of your vision coming through.  You are not as good as you think you are, especially if people do not believe in you. It is important to be proud of what you do, but do not allow that pride to consume your very being and what those around you think of you.

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15. You haven’t done your research

Many people begin their journey for success by guesswork. This may seem hard to believe, but think about how many times you’ve done serious research into your sector whether its starting a business or learning an instrument.  Without having an idea of what you’re getting into and where you’re going to spend your money on, it’s far less likely you know what’s to come. A hunch is not going to cut the bar in knowing what is required in your sector. Research prevails when achieving your ambition.

The 15 reasons, by far, are not the only reasons why many people lag behind success. I’ve selected reasons from many different facets of the journey to success, not just necessarily focusing on the typical wealth, fame & power mantra many have. Success varies on your lens. Take these 15 reasons on board in your everyday life. Print it out, copy it down, do what you need to do to keep this handy when you wonder why things may not be going well. I wish the very best in your vision.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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