Advertising
Advertising

14 Things To Do To Be A Great Writer

14 Things To Do To Be A Great Writer

I am an author, a playwright, and a freelance editor. I get asked all of the time what advice I have for aspiring writers. I have met a lot of talented and amazing authors of plays, novels, poems, and screenplays, and they all share the same habits Here a few things you can do as well.

1. Write every day

The idea of sitting down every single day and writing profound literary prose can be overwhelming. In reality, it’s much simpler to write every day. One of my writer friends works as an administrative assistant, and every day she writes for 15 minutes before work and for 15 minutes during her lunch break. You can talk about all of the great ideas you have for novels or screenplays all day long, but the number one way to be a writer is to sit down and actually write.

2. Keep a journal

Even for non-writers, a journal is a great tool for self-development. It gives you a place to document your life, process your emotions, and work out important decisions. In addition, writers who journal always have a place to record any ideas that may come to them and a place to practice writing.

Advertising

3. Look for lessons in everything

When something “bad” happens in your life, this gives you an excellent opportunity. Ask yourself how you can re-frame this seemingly negative event and use it for a basis for your writing. We all experience tragedies, but a skilled writer will be able to find a use for some of them.

4. Silence your inner critic

The critical voices in your head like to run wild when you sit down to write. “This is stupid.” “No one’s going to read this.” “Where is this going?” Don’t listen to them. They will stifle your creativity if you let them, so learn how to shut them up. Don’t judge yourself or limit your creativity.

5. Read as much as you can

Read the kind of books you want to write. Read books that excite you and make you feel passionate about storytelling. Learn from different writers by reading their work. Even if you read a book that you find to be poorly written, ask yourself what you can learn from it.

Advertising

6. Embrace rejection and criticism

Understand that all art is subjective. Getting rejected means you are putting yourself out there, which is great. I see so many writers who are incredibly talented but they never do anything with their work because they are afraid of rejection. Make a collage out of your rejection letters, and be proud of them. Every rejection you get represents a time when you tried, which is much more than a lot of people can say.

7. Try new things

Learn new skills, participate in new hobbies, go new places. See the world in as many different ways as possible. New activities, new locations, new people, new cultures. All of these things will inspire you to think of new stories.

8. Pay attention to the writing in your life

TV shows, films, even e-mails and social media updates can teach you something about writing. What did you think worked from a storytelling standpoint about that episode of Game of Thrones? Have you noticed a friend who uses poor grammar in his tweets? Are there ways your boss could have structured that e-mail better?

Advertising

9. Always find ways to grow

Don’t ever think you have reached perfection as a writer. No matter what level you are at, there’s always something to learn. You should always strive to improve.

10. Listen to other writers

In line with #9, some of the ways you can strive to improve and to always be learning are to take writing classes, read writing craft books, read writing blogs, follow writers on social media, etc. Learn from the wisdom of the writers you admire.

11. Challenge yourself

Nothing is too ambitious. Don’t tell yourself you can’t write a science fiction novel or that you can’t write a novel in a month. Allow yourself to go for it.

Advertising

12. Experience art

Go to museums, go to concerts, go see films, go see live theatre… Always look for new ways to be inspired and support other artists. You never know when a painting, a photograph, a song, or a film will inspire your next story.

13. Follow your obsessions

Write what you want to write, not what your parents or your friends or anyone else want you to write. Don’t write what you think will sell or what you think publishers want to see. Write about the things that make you excited. Write about the things you are passionate about. Write the stories you would love to read.

14. Value your own voice

Don’t compare yourself to other writers. Don’t try to be the next J.K. Rowling or Stephen King. Everyone has their own unique experiences, their own perspective. No two writers will have the same stories inside of them or tell stories in the same way. Find the stories only you can tell, and write them down. And when you’ve done that, keep writing.

Featured photo credit: Girl Writing in Her Moleskine Diary/Viktor Hanacek via picjumbo.com

More by this author

11 Amazing Benefits Of Singing You May Not Know 14 Things To Do To Be A Great Writer Photographer Constructs A Fantasy World For Us Through Candy-Colored Photos The Most Special And Interesting Gift Idea For Your Loved Ones

Trending in Productivity

1 How To Break the Procrastination Cycle 2 Types of Procrastination (And How To Fix Procrastination And Start Doing) 3 5 Tips for Overcoming Procrastination and Feeling Overwhelmed 4 Why You Procrastinate: 7 Possible Reasons You Can’t Get Anything Done 5 Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

Advertising

3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

Advertising

How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

Advertising

What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

Advertising

Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

Read Next