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Last Updated on November 27, 2020

13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner

13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner

According to a study it is discovered that fast learners (specifically language learners) have more white matter and less symmetrical brains. Learning fast or being a quick learner depends on how we use our brains. Sometimes what seem so sophisticated needs the simplest solution. Here is how to know if you are a pretty quick learner.

1. You are not afraid to say “I don’t know”

Pretty quick learners accept that they do not know it all. They keep their minds open and are willing to ask questions and quiz for answers to know more. While some are reluctant are hesitant to show their ignorance on a subject, quick learners are not.

2. You use the Pareto principle

Quick learning has productivity attached to it. According to Vilfredo Pareto you get 80% of your results from 20% of the things you do. Quick learners make use of this principle by focusing on the fundamental and the most used items in a series of difficult tests. They don’t chase after the whole bunch at once but major their strength on the most necessary ones first.

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3. You are able to visualize it

When dealt with problems, quick learners are multidimensional. They take advantage of how to deal with it with all their senses. They visualize it by taking advantage of their mental powers to drive solutions and learning.

4. You simplify

Quick learners know that difficult problems do not need a difficult approach. Many great minds from Thomas Edison to Henry Ford and even Steve Jobs looked for ways to address challenges with simple solutions. They simplify and immerse themselves in their goals to find the easiest and simplest way out of a hole.

5. You take action

After all is said and done, at the end of the day it is up to you to take action. If you are learning a new language you really cannot make so much progress if you do not speak the new language, whether you get it right or not. Quick learners learn by doing and taking decisive action.

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6. You are selective

You do not go after all the possible explanations or solutions to a problem. Rather you take your time to broadly consider those that are worthy of your attention and assessment. Through this you are able to go after the most promising solutions available.

7. You use Parkinson’s Law

Tim Ferris, author of The 4-Hour Work Week points out that much can be gained by combining the use of Parkinson’s law and Pareto’s principle to achieve solutions and learn faster. While Pareto’s principle means streamlining to get more out of your time, Parkinson’s Law means you limit the time for learning so as to gain only the most important things. Quick learners only allocate enough time to grasp only the most important part of a topic and waste no time on the less important parts.

8. You know when to stop

Quick learners know when to stop and not to proceed. If something is not going in an answerable pattern, they retreat. They understand the law of diminishing returns and focus on only things that provide a return on their investment.

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9. You know how to anticipate the future

What becomes old and stale is of no use to a quick learner; rather they have to be able to adapt and anticipate future trends and situations. You can focus on the future and how you can apply every topic you are learning to it.

10. You understand that many questions have no answers

Through selection you already have a sense of not going after the wrong questions or topics. You already know that when a question is complicated and has so many threads attached to it, there probably is no solution for it.

11. You can explain it to a kid

After immersing and absorbing yourself in a topic, you can communicate your thoughts and opinions on the subject matter (even to a kid).

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12. You are positive

Quick learners do not show any negative attitude to learning what is important to them. They are positive even when they are faced with setbacks and challenges.

13. You can seek the opinions of experts

You know there are people who are better than you on a subject. Nobody learns so much without dedicating themselves to the tutelage of a master!

Featured photo credit: http://www.photopin.com via photopin.com

More by this author

Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

10 Habits Of People Who Are Highly Successful At Work How to Form Your Success Formula to Get Unstuck in Life 6 Things To Do Every Day To Ensure You Stick To Your Goals 13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner 8 Reasons Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful

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Last Updated on January 12, 2021

The Faster You Learn, the Easier You’ll Fall Behind

The Faster You Learn, the Easier You’ll Fall Behind

Garry Kasparov is a chess grandmaster – and also a former world chess champion. Over the last few decades, he’s beaten hundreds of first-class chess players. It’s no surprise then, that many people consider Kasparov to be one of the greatest chess players of all time.

However, in 1997, Kasparov lost a game of chess to a computer. A year earlier, he had played against IBM’s Deep Blue chess computer and defeated it. But the computer was to have its revenge, as just one year later, when the rematch took place, Deep Blue defeated Kasparov.

    Over the next few years, humans and computers traded chess moves and blows. Fast-forward to 2017, and the picture is crystal clear: today’s best chess programs can easily beat the world’s best human chess players.[1]

    As the Kasparov story demonstrates, even the world’s top players – who practiced a lot – can end up losing.

    Now consider your friends, family and colleagues. How many of these people think they’re doing well in what they do? And how many think they are doing better than the average and have stopped looking for ways to improve themselves? The answer is, a lot.

    Why Learning Can Lead to Stagnation

    When people learn well – they pick up knowledge and quickly become skillful. And the smarter the people, the easier they pick up knowledge, and the easier and faster they become very good at something.

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    These types of individuals find learning effortless, and therefore, they pick up knowledge and skills much better than the average person.

    Take a look at the picture below. The tool in their hand represents the skill they have learned, and the cloud is the level they are currently on – in this case ground level.

      When these learners become knowers, they believe that they know what they’ve learned extremely well. This may be the case, but in reality, they’re already better than average. Because of this, they are unlikely to find anyone who can surpass them. It’s at this point that they may think to themselves, “I’m good enough” and “there’s no need for me learn anything more.”

        As I’ll show in the next few paragraphs, people’s egos can stop them from learning and improving themselves.

        For example, let’s take a look at an expert pianist. They can perform proficiently because of their hard work and practice that they’ve put in over the course of many years. To help them, they may have had a tutor who developed their skills and brought out their talent.

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        The consistent tutoring and practicing led them to become an accomplished pianist – one who regularly performs paid concerts in front of decent-sized audiences. However, their success has led them to believe that they don’t need to make any further changes or improvements to their musical skills.

          When experts stop learning – they start to fall behind. This is because others will keep improving, and eventually get ahead of them.

          The world is constantly changing, so sticking to the same way to practice (and failing to improve) will lead to people dropping the ball. A recent study predicted that one in five U.K. employees are under threat of losing their jobs to automation. A person who’s comfortable in their job today, may find themselves replaced by a computer or robot tomorrow. If this prediction comes true, millions of people will soon find themselves out of work.[2] This is a real life example of how people can fall behind when they stop learning and improving themselves.

          Clearly, any experts who stop learning and improving, will be replaced by those who keep learning – whether these are humans or machines.

            When You Think You’ve Learned Enough, You Fall Behind

            The cloud depicted in the visuals isn’t concrete, and it’s prone to fall and disappear any time when you stop paying attention to your own learning and development.

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            Everyone, no matter how good they believe themselves to be at something, should never stop learning. Reaching an ‘acceptable’ performance only means that you’re doing okay. It doesn’t mean that you’re doing it to the best of your ability or potential.

            As I stated earlier (but well worth repeating again)… When you stop learning, you’re falling behind.

              Push Yourself to Reach New Heights

              To keep ahead of your competitors, you need to keep learning and practicing. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean doing things in the same way. You may need to step outside of your comfort zone in order to improve.

                Do what you can’t

                When you think you’re doing something well enough, find what you can’t do – and then do it! Here are four key things to remember about pushing your boundaries:

                1. If you never push yourself beyond your comfort zone, you will never improve.
                2. Getting out of your comfort zone means trying to do something that you couldn’t do before.
                3. Sometimes you’ll run into something that stops you in your tracks. Find ways around these hurdles by focusing on improving your skills and knowledge, and then practicing them until you become proficient.
                4. Don’t be afraid to experiment. You may need to try different ways to make things happen.

                Set yourself specific goals as you practice

                People who achieve great things set themselves definite goals. And I highly recommend that you do the same.

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                One great way to do this is to follow the SMART and Stretch goal methods, which will help you set a big goal, while at the same time giving you baby steps on how to reach it. When SMART and Stretch goals are combined, your goal setting will have genuine purpose and power. You’ll be motivated by the giant goal, while having confidence in the small, incremental steps that will lead you there.

                Find out more about goals setting in my other article: How to Get Bigger Things Done in the Coming Year

                Along the way, you need to get feedback to help you improve

                It goes without saying that to make progress, you’ll need feedback to identify exactly where and how you are falling short. This feedback can be from yourself or from outside observers (e.g., your audience, your mentor, your peers).

                Do you know why computers can beat humans at chess after those times they’ve lost against them? The answer is, that people who program the computers have learned through all the steps humans have performed. They also gathered valuable feedback through their computers losing against some competitors. The programmers pick up the clues and change the way the computers perform in their next matches.

                Learning Should Never Come to an End

                When we’re young we naturally crave learning. We constantly seek out new knowledge, skills and experiences. However, as we mature, there’s a tendency for us to stop learning new things.

                If this happens, you can be sure that stagnation is just around the corner. And as nature shows, nothing (even stagnation) stays the same for long. Things are either building up – or breaking down.

                To avoid the latter, you must maintain a positive outlook that embraces big goals and constant learning. By doing these things, you’ll stay fresh, lively and ahead of the pack of hyenas snapping at your heels!

                Reference

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