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Last Updated on November 27, 2020

13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner

13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner

According to a study it is discovered that fast learners (specifically language learners) have more white matter and less symmetrical brains. Learning fast or being a quick learner depends on how we use our brains. Sometimes what seem so sophisticated needs the simplest solution. Here is how to know if you are a pretty quick learner.

1. You are not afraid to say “I don’t know”

Pretty quick learners accept that they do not know it all. They keep their minds open and are willing to ask questions and quiz for answers to know more. While some are reluctant are hesitant to show their ignorance on a subject, quick learners are not.

2. You use the Pareto principle

Quick learning has productivity attached to it. According to Vilfredo Pareto you get 80% of your results from 20% of the things you do. Quick learners make use of this principle by focusing on the fundamental and the most used items in a series of difficult tests. They don’t chase after the whole bunch at once but major their strength on the most necessary ones first.

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3. You are able to visualize it

When dealt with problems, quick learners are multidimensional. They take advantage of how to deal with it with all their senses. They visualize it by taking advantage of their mental powers to drive solutions and learning.

4. You simplify

Quick learners know that difficult problems do not need a difficult approach. Many great minds from Thomas Edison to Henry Ford and even Steve Jobs looked for ways to address challenges with simple solutions. They simplify and immerse themselves in their goals to find the easiest and simplest way out of a hole.

5. You take action

After all is said and done, at the end of the day it is up to you to take action. If you are learning a new language you really cannot make so much progress if you do not speak the new language, whether you get it right or not. Quick learners learn by doing and taking decisive action.

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6. You are selective

You do not go after all the possible explanations or solutions to a problem. Rather you take your time to broadly consider those that are worthy of your attention and assessment. Through this you are able to go after the most promising solutions available.

7. You use Parkinson’s Law

Tim Ferris, author of The 4-Hour Work Week points out that much can be gained by combining the use of Parkinson’s law and Pareto’s principle to achieve solutions and learn faster. While Pareto’s principle means streamlining to get more out of your time, Parkinson’s Law means you limit the time for learning so as to gain only the most important things. Quick learners only allocate enough time to grasp only the most important part of a topic and waste no time on the less important parts.

8. You know when to stop

Quick learners know when to stop and not to proceed. If something is not going in an answerable pattern, they retreat. They understand the law of diminishing returns and focus on only things that provide a return on their investment.

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9. You know how to anticipate the future

What becomes old and stale is of no use to a quick learner; rather they have to be able to adapt and anticipate future trends and situations. You can focus on the future and how you can apply every topic you are learning to it.

10. You understand that many questions have no answers

Through selection you already have a sense of not going after the wrong questions or topics. You already know that when a question is complicated and has so many threads attached to it, there probably is no solution for it.

11. You can explain it to a kid

After immersing and absorbing yourself in a topic, you can communicate your thoughts and opinions on the subject matter (even to a kid).

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12. You are positive

Quick learners do not show any negative attitude to learning what is important to them. They are positive even when they are faced with setbacks and challenges.

13. You can seek the opinions of experts

You know there are people who are better than you on a subject. Nobody learns so much without dedicating themselves to the tutelage of a master!

Featured photo credit: http://www.photopin.com via photopin.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

10 Habits Of People Who Are Highly Successful At Work How to Form Your Success Formula to Get Unstuck in Life 6 Things To Do Every Day To Ensure You Stick To Your Goals 13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner 8 Reasons Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful

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Published on April 12, 2021

How to Take Constructive Criticism Like a Champ

How to Take Constructive Criticism Like a Champ

Did somebody just say the words “constructive criticism”? Great, just what I need—someone to tell me how to do my job, like I don’t know how to flawlessly execute on my job. Well, maybe not flawlessly, but I think I know what I’m doing thank you very much.

This is how many people react when they hear the term constructive criticism. And it makes sense, as most of us don’t like to have someone telling us how we did something wrong or how we can do better. We like to feel like we are good at the things we choose to do unless, of course, we are trying something new. We take a certain amount of pride in how we do our various jobs and don’t like to have our shortcomings pointed out to us.

Before we get too worked up, let’s take a look at what constructive criticism is and how we can utilize it to help us improve at work or wherever we want to. we will learn that constructive criticism can be used to our advantage.

What Is Constructive Criticism?

First and foremost, it would be helpful to make sure we have a good understanding of what constructive criticism is.

When we hear the word “criticism,” our minds typically think negatively and hostile—like one person is standing over another person telling them that the way they are doing something is all wrong. And that is being critical.

However, this is not the intent of constructive criticism. Constructive criticism is a helpful way of providing feedback that provides specific and actionable suggestions. Instead of one person acting like a manager giving a team member general non-specific advice, constructive criticism is specific to the actions and situation. Given properly, it provides specific and clear recommendations on how to make changes and improvements that will lead to a more positive outcome in a given situation.

Accepting Constructive Criticism

As we just read, constructive criticism is provided to help someone improve in one manner or another. It’s not negative generalities or complaining, it’s specific actionable input provided with the intent of helping someone improve on something they’ve done so they get more desirable results the next time.

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This is exactly the context in which you should accept constructive criticism. It is meant to help you improve. Anyone who is interested in getting better and better at their job or craft should welcome it.

Think about a time when you got a big win at work or were part of a team that scored a big win. What an incredible feeling! Now, think about a time when a big project crashed and burned at work, or you didn’t land a huge new client, or your team played poorly and lost a big game—not a good feeling.

The way you handle these losses and learn from them to get better and score more “wins” is just like receiving constructive criticism. Learn from what went wrong to make things go right more often.

How to Handle Constructive Criticism

Now that we have a clear idea of what constructive criticism is, let’s look at the best ways to handle constructive criticism.

1. Stop Your Initial Reaction

When you see that some criticism is about to come your way, recognize it. Make yourself see what’s about to happen and tell yourself you will not react.

The key here is stopping any sort of reaction you are going to have when your brain realizes what’s about to happen. The challenge is that our first reaction is not generally a good one, and we don’t want to wear an initial expression that comes off as highly defensive or angry.

2. Don’t Take It Personally

I’m so happy I fully embrace and believe in the “don’t take anything personally” mentality. It’s important to remember that nobody is doing something to you specifically. They are sharing their personal experience and insights from what they’ve learned and seen. This does not make it universally right, it’s simply the way they’ve experienced it. And we all have different experiences that make each of our points of view unique. It’s not about you, it’s about the situation. Don’t take it personally.

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3. Remember the Benefit

This is a good thing to do when your first initial reaction of “no” comes into your mind. Receiving constructive criticism is a way to help yourself improve. Remember that you don’t have to digest and implement every single suggestion word for word. Take the parts that resonate with you and use them the next time a similar situation comes around. This is how we learn and grow.

4. Listen to Understand

Active listening

is very important here. Make sure that you are paying full attention to the speaker’s words and body language. You are attempting to understand completely so you are able to truly process the feedback and utilize it down the road. Keep your eyes and ears on the speaker and be present in the moment of receiving the feedback.

5. Be Thankful

It’s not easy to be thankful when someone is telling you how you could have done something better. This is where you put on your “big person pants” and tell them, “thank you for taking the time to share the feedback.”.

If you think about it, they most likely want the best for you. Why else would they be taking the time to share their insights and input with you? If they didn’t care or have a vested interest, why would they take the time? Exactly. Remember this when saying thank you.

6. Ask Questions to Understand Fully

This is where you want to ask clarifying questions to make sure you are fully understanding what the person is saying to you. Make sure you are on the same page as what they are telling you. If you don’t take the time to ask questions to clear up any confusion, then, in the long run, this feedback won’t be of much value to you.

Using Criticisms to Improve

Now, let’s take a look at how constructive criticism helps us improve, as we’ve read that reviewing when things don’t go right and analyzing why they didn’t go right help us figure out ways to change what we did to gain better results next time.

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1. Feedback Is Always Helpful

The first way you can use constructive criticism to improve is by acknowledging that feedback is always helpful. This doesn’t necessarily mean that all feedback is beneficial to you. It just means that it’s helpful.

You may disagree wholeheartedly on part of the feedback you receive, and that’s fine. The main thing to remember is that it’s always helpful. Gathering data, reviewing, and listening to others help you look at situations from an angle different than your own.

Speaking of which…

2. You Get Another Point of View

A great thing about listening to someone provide constructive criticism to you is that you get another point of view. Too many times we base what we think we should do on only our own perceptions of something. It’s very possible to be so close to something that you don’t truly see it in an objective light.

I know from back when I was an artist, I could get very locked into a certain project or painting. When I finally would take a break and ask someone else what they thought, many times they pointed out things I’d never noticed or thought of. The same concept applies here.

3. It Shows You Are Worth It

When someone takes the time to provide constructive criticism to you, it shows that they care and feel like you are worth it. They wouldn’t take the time if they didn’t think it would matter or that you weren’t worth it. This is something to think about the next time your manager wants to offer you some insight or advice.

4. It Helps You Improve

If you are willing to truly listen to constructive criticism, it can help you improve greatly. I think about a wide variety of times when I’ve gotten feedback and constructive criticism. I am known to invite it.

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I look at it like this—we are all on the same team (whether that’s an actual team or work team) and trying to work towards the same goal. What can I do better that can help us collectively win as a team? I like to think that I’m pretty good at what I do. I also know that I can always get better. Help me to help you, which helps us both.

5. It Can Inspire You

Finally, constructive criticism can inspire you. Sometimes, the person providing you feedback will make you see something you never saw about yourself. This is how another point of view can be so valuable. This can be incredibly eye-opening and sometimes be even one of those “Aha!” moments.

Summary

We’ve looked at what constructive criticism is and how to accept it. We’ve seen how if we allow ourselves to listen and accept the feedback, it can incredibly valuable to our growth and improvement. Constructive criticism can help us get better and better at what we do. Not any less important, we’ve discovered how to take constructive criticism like a champ.

Remember, getting feedback from others is critical to our growth in many areas of our life. Use constructive criticism to improve yourself.

More About Constructive Criticism

Featured photo credit: Mimi Thian via unsplash.com

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