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11 Simple Tips to Effective Email Management

11 Simple Tips to Effective Email Management

How much time do you spend managing your e-mails every day? An hour? 30 minutes? A few hours? Maybe half a day?

While email is intended to facilitate communication, I suspect that it sometimes becomes a counter-productive tool because we spend so much time managing your e-mails! For example, think of these instances:

  • Do you sometimes keep clicking into your inbox, even though you just checked it only 5 minutes ago?
  • Do you spend much time managing your e-mails each day, like searching past mail, sorting, organizing, and deleting old mail?
  • Do you often make e-mails your first priority rather than actually getting things done?
  • Are there days where you spend more time in your inbox than doing proper work?

At the end of the day, email is just a tool for you to get your tasks done. Below are 11 tips to improve your email management:

1. Process your mail once a day

Even though I check my mail several times a day just to be in the loop (in case there’s something weird going on like my website going down, or if there’s an urgent request), I don’t process them right away. I only do so once a day, either at the beginning of the day or in the evenings.

Set aside a daily time slot to process your emails. If you don’t finish in the time slot, continue the next day. Prioritize the more important ones and let go of the rest. (See #2).

If you are in a working-level position where you get a lot of time-sensitive emails, you can still put this into practice. The point is not to let email run over your life. Remember, it’s a tool to help you do your work and not the work itself.

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2. Prioritize 20% emails; Defer 80% ones

Not all emails are the same. I love the 80/20 rule because it applies to every single area of our lives. Including emails. 80/20 rule is the idea that 20% of inputs are responsible for 80% of the outputs in any situation. Hence, to be effective, we should focus on 20% inputs that lead to 80% outputs. Likewise, we should focus on 20% high value emails that lead to maximum output.

My 20% emails are the ones that give me the next breakthrough in my work. They can be media requests, interview spots, networking opportunities, business leads, speaking opportunities, and other things that lead to my 20% business goals. My 20% emails also include people who have invested into my work, such as my 1-1 coaching clients, speaking engagements and readers who bought my courses and products. Last but not least, correspondences with my good friends also fall here. Everything else goes into the 80% mail.

For the 20% emails, I give them significant priority. I usually reply to them immediately (especially if they meet the 1 minute rule in #9); if not I’ll get to them in 1-3 days’ time. For 80% mail, I take a longer time to reply, sometimes not even replying too (see point #4).

3. Have a “Reply by XX Day” folder

File the mail that need your reply in a “Reply by XX Day” folder, where XX is the day of the week. I set aside 3 days every week to reply to emails – Tues, Thu and Sat. This way I’m not pressured to reply immediate whenever I get the mail. I read it, mentally acknowledge it, and think over it until it’s time to reply (an average of 3-8 days from receipt of the mail).

4. Realize you don’t need to reply to every mail

Despite what you think, you don’t need to reply to every mail. Sometimes, no reply after a certain time period can be considered a reply in itself too.

I get a high volume of reader mail, and for a period of time I used to reply to every single mail that came in. It didn’t do anything for me. I would be spending the whole day just replying mail, and by the end of the day I would be drained out, unable to do any real work. And interestingly, pretty much all the mail I reply to never get a return response of any sort (not even an acknowledgment or thank you), even when I post follow-up questions to further help them. I suspect half the mail don’t get read, and the other half are mail which people send on impulse and replies don’t really matter. Either way, I have realized it’s a lot more effective to use the time on more high value tasks, such as working on high value and content-rich products, supporting my 1-1 coaching clients, new projects and writing new articles.

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Don’t stress too much about replying to every single mail. Reply if it helps, but if the costs of replying don’t outweigh the benefits, then maybe it’s not worth worrying about it. Just let it be and things will sort themselves out through time.

5. Create template replies if you often send similar replies

If you look through your sent folder, you’ll probably find a trend in things you reply to. The mail I receive on my site can usually be classified in one of the few categories (1) feedback / thank you mail (2) 1-1 coaching (3) requests for book/product reviews (4) speaking inquiries (5) others. For (1) and (2), I use templates which I have written before-hand which I use in my replies. As I reply, I would customize them accordingly to fit the needs of the original mail. This saved me huge amounts of time, compared to in the past when I would type emails from scratch.

6. Read only the emails that are relevant

I subscribe to several newsletters – such as on fitness, self-help, blogging and business, but I don’t read all the mails they send. I don’t delete them either, because I know they have valuable information. Instead, I set gmail to automatically archive them to different labels (folders). Blog mails get archived into the blogging folder, fitness mails get archived into health & fitness folder, and so on. As of now, I have about 30 folders. I only read them when I want to get more information on the topic.

You don’t need to read every single mail that comes in. Pick and select what’s relevant to you.

7. Structure your mails into categories

Folders (or labels, if you use gmail) are there to help you organize your mails.

Firstly, use a relevant naming system to what you’re doing. If your biggest priorities now are, say, (1) writing a book and (2) losing weight, then name your folders as that.

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Secondly, use hierarchy structure. first level folders are for the big categories, and second level folders are for sub-categories, and so on. For example, I have “Admin” as a first level folder, and “Back-Up”, “Accounting”, “Accounts”, etc as second level folders. If need be, I have third level folders to further segment them. Gmail has an add-on which lets you use different tier labels (Settings > Labs > Nested Labels)

Using filters (#8) to automatically organize mail into folders works wonders.

8. Use filters

Filters are tools that help you sort out the mail automatically when it gets into your mail. There are 2 basic things are required for a filter – (1) The term to look out for (2) Action to apply if the term is matched.  As of now, my gmail has about 20 different filters set up for different email addresses, subject titles, body text and what not. Depending on what filter it is, the mail will be automatically sorted into a respective folder / archived. This minimizes the amount of administrative actions I need to do.

Here’s my video tutorial sharing how I set up my e-mail filters to achieve inbox zero: 3 Simple Tips To Achieve Inbox Zero Using E-mail Filters [Video Tutorial]

9. Use the 1 minute rule when replying

If it takes within 1 minute to reply, reply to it immediately and archive it. Don’t let it sit in your mail box for ages. It’s going to take even more effort letting it hover around your mind and being constantly reminded that you need to reply. Just make sure you keep to the 1-minute time frame when replying so it does not take more time than needed. This helps me to clear big batch of mail in a short amount of time.

10. Set a limit to the time you spend in the inbox

Beyond the 1 minute rule, limit the overall time you spend in your inbox. The next time you check your mail, time yourself. See how long you take to process, read, reply, and sort through your mail. Then ask yourself how much of that time is well-spent. Chances are, most of that served absolutely no purpose.

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At times, you’ll get emails which are alarmingly long. For these emails, scan through, see if there’s anything relevant to you, then process them accordingly. Reply if needed (and use the 1 minute rule); archive it if you don’t plan to reply. If you’re going to reply, don’t feel the need to revert with a lengthy mail just because the person wrote a long mail. The last thing you want is an email exchange of essays, which will inadvertently result in you falling into an email black hole. Log into your inbox, do what you need to do, and get out right after that.

11. (Ruthlessly) Unsubscribe from things you don’t read

In your cruising around the web, you probably sign up for a fair share of newsletters and feeds on impulse which you lose interest in afterward. If you find yourself repeatedly deleting the mail from your subscriptions, it’s a cue that you should just unsubscribe immediately.

Get the manifesto version of this article: [Manifesto] 11 Tips To Effective Email Management

Original Article: 11 Simple Tips to Effective Email Management | Personal Excellence

Featured photo credit: Businesswoman drawing an e-mail envelope via shutterstock.com

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Celestine Chua

Celestine is the Founder of Personal Excellence where she shares her best advice on how to boost productivity and achieve excellence in life.

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Last Updated on July 3, 2020

6 Things To Do Every Day To Ensure You Stick To Your Goals

6 Things To Do Every Day To Ensure You Stick To Your Goals

Sticking to your goals can sometimes be challenging. We all want better health, better careers, and better jobs, and we want to cast an impression on everyone that we are living fulfilled lives.

Yet to reach our goals and make every minute of our time count requires commitment, consistency, and hard work. Setting goals is one thing, but sticking to them is another. We have to observe certain daily practices if we want to get the best out of ourselves.

Here are 6 things that you have to ensure daily to reach your goals.

1. Involve Others

You have to be accountable for the actions you are committing yourself to. Involve everyone around you, get them engaged, and talk to them on how they can help you accomplish your goals.

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When you involve others you feel, you have a responsibility towards them as well as yourself. Every day, make sure you are accountable for sticking to your goals. By joining groups or engaging others, you have more motivation to reach your goals.

For example, if you want to read more, try joining a book club. If you want to be a better entrepreneur, join an entrepreneurial organization.

2. Visualize the Rewards

Reaching a goal can be challenging and sometimes, it can be overwhelming. When the journey becomes tough and difficult, try to stick to visualizing your successes every day.

Wake up to visualize what rewards you will get from sticking to meeting your goals. If you want to lose some pounds, visualize yourself already underweight and benefiting from being underweight. The mind has a way of channeling your body and intentions to sticking to your goals and reaching them.

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3. Break Down Your Goals

Try to break down your goals into tiny chunks. The smaller the size of the goals, the more willing and prepared you are to meet them.

For example, if you find it difficult to get out of the house and take a workout at the gym, why not try to break the goal into making sure you are always dressed for the gym daily? By doing this, you demonstrate that you are moving in the right direction, and you can keep this momentum so you can meet the larger goal.

4. Reward Yourself

For every progress you make daily towards reaching your goals, try to vindicate and reward yourself. By doing this you appreciate yourself and the hard work you have put in for the day.

When you reward yourself, you program yourself to benefit from a larger reward in the future. You also propel yourself to gain daily rewards, which can be enticing and motivating. Rewarding yourself serves as a form of positive reinforcement that reinforces your mind and behavior to stick to your goals and stay motivated.

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5. Measure Your Progress

It is easy to become frustrated when you are not getting instant results. Change can be slow and rewards are not always immediate. Still, progress can be measured even in tiny bits, so take time to look back at where you are coming from.

You don’t have to feel depressed about not making that major progress in an instant. But when you journal or snap pictures to document your progress, no matter how small, you will feel grateful and elated to see what difference you have made from where you are coming from up until now.

6. Believe in the Possibilities

If you don’t even believe in the possibility of reaching your goals, how can you expect yourself to stick to your goals in the first place?

By believing in the possibilities of accomplishing a goal or task, you increase your chance of reaching it and eradicating whatever roadblocks or challenges you may face. Believe in what you can achieve.

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What self-belief has over self-control is that while self-control can be depleted but self-belief cannot. We all have an enormous reservoir of how much we can believe in ourselves.

With believing in ourselves comes perseverance, determination, and desire to reaching our goals. Every day, understand that what you need to keep going is your belief toward achieving your goals. Your goals are reachable if you think you can reach them!

Final Words

Due to circumstances in life, people tend to abandon some of their goals in life. You may also feel this way sometimes. In that case, just come back to this article and remember the 6 ways you can help yourself stick to your goals.

People don’t always reach their goals, but you will never know if you can reach them if you don’t stick to them in the first place. As long as you stick to your goals, there will always be the possibility of you achieving them!

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Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

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