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11 Productive Places You Should Try Working In

11 Productive Places You Should Try Working In

Working in an office doesn’t always inspire you to be productive and often it can wear you down. The morning commute, the lack of sleep and the suffocating space can become a burden to your productivity. At this point you will begin to focus on the clock — 11:00 am, 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm… each hour feels like a lifetime and you need to find another place that will inspire you. Here are 11 productive places you can start with:

1. Your Home.

Home Office

    The office can become smaller and smaller when you spend eight hours a day sitting within its cubicle walls. Try spending one day a week at home, not only do you save a tonne of time from the morning commute and getting ready but you will also save time working uninterrupted from co-workers or clients dropping by.

    The day at home will recharge your batteries and allow you to hit your work with a fresh mind.

    2. The Local Library.

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    Library

      The local library is a place filled with those all with the same goal as you: to get work done! If you’re the type of person that can’t be at home and work because of all the distractions, then the library is the place for you. With nothing but books, computers, and knowledgeable people around you, it’s hard not to be productive. There is no place better than the library to sit down, concentrate, and focus on the task at hand.

      3. Co-Working Space.

      Co Working Space
        Photo via Harald [ha75]
        Co-working spaces are perfect for those people that work at home but want somewhere to go for the work day, and be social around a community of like-minded individuals. Co-Working spaces are becoming increasingly more common and it’s easy to see why, they offer a professional environment and eliminates distractions from working at home.

        Numerous people in the design industry and budding entrepreneurs are often freelancers or working from home. The co-working space will get you out of the house, around professional people, and networking with like-minded people.

        4. Coffee Shop.

        KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA
          Photo via Andy Miah

          The coffee shop is a great place to get away from the frustrating aspects of an office, yet it still has the atmosphere to spur your creativity. Coffee shops offer various perks to make your work day go a little faster, such as quality food, an endless supply of coffee, free Wifi, and power outlets.

          The coffee shop is seen as one of the most productive places for professionals, writers especially, because of the inviting atmosphere that helps your creative juices flow.

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          5. Another Country.

          Paris

            Nothing will inspire you like completing your work in another country. Clearly working in another country is not the easiest option, but for those that have the ability to work away from the office for a couple of weeks and the funds available, this is an excellent option.

            Work fills a large part of our lives and we need to find ways to keep it enjoyable. We spend a lot of time away from our families and takes us away from the more important things in life, so why not take your work overseas with your family? You are sure to increase your productivity looking upon the Eiffel Tower in Paris or the beautiful view of Manhattan in New York.

            6. The Park.

            Park Work
              Photo via FaceMePLS

              One of the most easily accessible and productive places to take your work is the park. Moving outdoors every once in a while will help your creativity; it’s easy to hit a mental roadblock when you are constantly locked indoors and the time outside will alleviate that a little bit.

              Many parks in major cities now have free Wifi, such as Bryant Park in NYC, or in some cases, entire cities now have Wifi capabilities. Productivity can be hard to obtain; however, being outside in the sunshine and breathing in the fresh air, you give yourself a good chance of finding it.

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              7. Your Childhood Home.

              Childhood Home

                Altering your surroundings is certain to improve your productivity, and although it may seem like a strange idea spending a day at the house you grew up in, it can be inspirational. Remembering where it all started and where you came from can motivate you, in turn making you far more productive. Get away from the hustle and bustle of the city, save time in the morning, and relax yourself.

                8. The Airport.

                Airport Work
                  Photo via Jean-Etienne Minh-Duy Porrier

                  Airports are exceptionally accommodating for the traveling businessman or businesswoman with most airports providing workrooms for their travelers. Airports such as Changi airport in Singapore, are fully equipped to allow you to conduct businesswithout any troubles. With internet stations, Wifi, and plenty of places to grab a snack, the airport really is one of the more productive places you can work in.

                  9. A Bar.

                  Bar

                    A bar doesn’t seem like one of the most productive places to work in, but in off-peak times it can be an enjoyable atmosphere. Many bars have free Wifi service and of course they offer great meals. Ernest Hemingway was known for the time he spent at the bar and he seemed to be productive, so why can’t you?

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                    The best part about doing your work at a bar is the easy transition from work mode to after work mode, the bar atmosphere can be a relaxing and enjoyable place to be and it could be the place that creates your finest work.

                    10. At the Beach.

                    Beach Work
                      Photo via Michael Coghlan

                      If you’re looking for a place to get away from everything and just get some work done, the beach is one of the more uplifting and productive places to do that. The beach offers plenty of places to sit down such as park benches and cafes, or if you prefer you can dig your feet in the sand with an umbrella above your head and take it all in.

                      Work is the primary objective, but it wouldn’t hurt to jump up and dive into the water or just look up and enjoy the view.

                      11. The Hotel Lobby.

                      Hotel Lobby

                        Hotels provide some of the world’s most extravagant facilities and rooms for you to enjoy, and in addition to that it is also a quiet and spacious place for you to get your work done. All the pieces are in place for you to be productive in a hotel lobby with Wifi, concierge services, and legroom for days. Not to mention, it’s easy to take and make phone calls. Furthermore, a hotel lobby will offer you amenities such as toilet facilities and places for you to grab a drink when you’re all done.

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                        Last Updated on July 10, 2020

                        The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness

                        The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness

                        Life is wasted in the in-between times. The time between when your alarm first rings and when you finally decide to get out of bed. The time between when you sit at your desk and when productive work begins. The time between making a decision and doing something about it.

                        Slowly, your day is whittled away from all the unused in-between moments. Eventually, time wasters, laziness, and procrastination get the better of you.

                        The solution to reclaim these lost middle moments is by creating rituals. Every culture on earth uses rituals to transfer information and encode behaviors that are deemed important. Personal rituals can help you build a better pattern for handling everything from how you wake up to how you work.

                        Unfortunately, when most people see rituals, they see pointless superstitions. Indeed, many rituals are based on a primitive understanding of the world. But by building personal rituals, you get to encode the behaviors you feel are important and cut out the wasted middle moments.

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                        Program Your Own Algorithms

                        Another way of viewing rituals is by seeing them as computer algorithms. An algorithm is a set of instructions that is repeated to get a result.

                        Some algorithms are highly efficient, sorting or searching millions of pieces of data in a few seconds. Other algorithms are bulky and awkward, taking hours to do the same task.

                        By forming rituals, you are building algorithms for your behavior. Take the delayed and painful pattern of waking up, debating whether to sleep in for another two minutes, hitting the snooze button, repeat until almost late for work. This could be reprogrammed to get out of bed immediately, without debating your decision.

                        How to Form a Ritual

                        I’ve set up personal rituals for myself for handling e-mail, waking up each morning, writing articles, and reading books. Far from making me inflexible, these rituals give me a useful default pattern that works best 99% of the time. Whenever my current ritual won’t work, I’m always free to stop using it.

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                        Forming a ritual isn’t too difficult, and the same principles for changing habits apply:

                        1. Write out your sequence of behavior. I suggest starting with a simple ritual of only 3-4 steps maximum. Wait until you’ve established a ritual before you try to add new steps.
                        2. Commit to following your ritual for thirty days. This step will take the idea and condition it into your nervous system as a habit.
                        3. Define a clear trigger. When does your ritual start? A ritual to wake up is easy—the sound of your alarm clock will work. As for what triggers you to go to the gym, read a book or answer e-mail—you’ll have to decide.
                        4. Tweak the Pattern. Your algorithm probably won’t be perfectly efficient the first time. Making a few tweaks after the first 30-day trial can make your ritual more useful.

                        Ways to Use a Ritual

                        Based on the above ideas, here are some ways you could implement your own rituals:

                        1. Waking Up

                        Set up a morning ritual for when you wake up and the next few things you do immediately afterward. To combat the grogginess after immediately waking up, my solution is to do a few pushups right after getting out of bed. After that, I sneak in ninety minutes of reading before getting ready for morning classes.

                        2. Web Usage

                        How often do you answer e-mail, look at Google Reader, or check Facebook each day? I found by taking all my daily internet needs and compressing them into one, highly-efficient ritual, I was able to cut off 75% of my web time without losing any communication.

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                        3. Reading

                        How much time do you get to read books? If your library isn’t as large as you’d like, you might want to consider the rituals you use for reading. Programming a few steps to trigger yourself to read instead of watching television or during a break in your day can chew through dozens of books each year.

                        4. Friendliness

                        Rituals can also help with communication. Set up a ritual of starting a conversation when you have opportunities to meet people.

                        5. Working

                        One of the hardest barriers when overcoming procrastination is building up a concentrated flow. Building those steps into a ritual can allow you to quickly start working or continue working after an interruption.

                        6. Going to the gym

                        If exercising is a struggle, encoding a ritual can remove a lot of the difficulty. Set up a quick ritual for going to exercise right after work or when you wake up.

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                        7. Exercise

                        Even within your workouts, you can have rituals. Spacing the time between runs or reps with a certain number of breaths can remove the guesswork. Forming a ritual of doing certain exercises in a particular order can save time.

                        8. Sleeping

                        Form a calming ritual in the last 30-60 minutes of your day before you go to bed. This will help slow yourself down and make falling asleep much easier. Especially if you plan to get up full of energy in the morning, it will help if you remove insomnia.

                        8. Weekly Reviews

                        The weekly review is a big part of the GTD system. By making a simple ritual checklist for my weekly review, I can get the most out of this exercise in less time. Originally, I did holistic reviews where I wrote my thoughts on the week and progress as a whole. Now, I narrow my focus toward specific plans, ideas, and measurements.

                        Final Thoughts

                        We all want to be productive. But time wasters, procrastination, and laziness sometimes get the better of us. If you’re facing such difficulties, don’t be afraid to make use of these rituals to help you conquer them.

                        More Tips to Conquer Time Wasters and Procrastination

                         

                        Featured photo credit: RODOLFO BARRETO via unsplash.com

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